Feb 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3+1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Computer Science

  
  • CS 1500 - Introduction to Server Systems


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An introduction to server and operating systems focusing on the use of Linux. Students will learn how to perform basic administration of a Linux based system in the areas of command line usage, process control, user management, software installation and software removal. Additionally, the student will gain a basic fluency in the structure of the operating system, including items such as bootup process and kernel structure. Scheduled and unscheduled laboratory projects. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 1600 - Project Management Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): CS 1200 , CS 1250  or SE 1100 .
    This course presents the fundamentals of project management for application in subsequent project oriented courses throughout the curriculum. Credit(s): 1
  
  • CS 2010 - Discrete Math for Computing


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030 ; CS 1200  or CS 1250 .
    This is an introductory course to the mathematics of computing. It will cover basic mathematical concepts relevant to computing. Topics include: set theory, relations, functions, addition and multiplicative principles, finite states, logic, graphs, Boolean algebra, algorithms. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 2100 - Introduction to Computer Systems


    Prerequisite(s): CS 1350 .
    Computer structure, machine language, data representation, the instruction set, input-output. Symbolic coding and assembly language, addressing techniques, program segmentation and linkage, macros, the assembler, and system organization. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 2410 - Discrete Structures


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  or MA 1090 ; CS 1300  or IS 1300 .
    Induction, Big-Oh analysis and recurrence relations, mathematical aspects of trees, mathematical aspects of sets, relations, graph theory, automata and regular expressions, context-free grammars, propositional and predicate logic. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 2500 - Database Systems


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1300  or CS 1300 .
    Database management systems. Sequential storage devices. Physical characteristics of and data representation on random access storage devices. Inverted lists, multilist, indexed sequential, and hierarchical file structures. File I/O. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 2990 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of computer science. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • CS 3200 - Operating Systems


    Prerequisite(s): CS 2100 .
    Operating system concepts and components are studied and modeled using various client and server operating systems. Topics include: process controls, multiprogramming, system performance, synchronization principles, memory management, deadlocks, access methodologies. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 3500 - Numerical Methods


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2300 .
    This course will emphasize the development of numerical algorithms to provide solutions to common problems formulated in science and engineering. The primary objective of the course is to develop the basic understanding of the construction of numerical algorithms, and the applicability and limits of their appropriate use. The emphasis of the course will be on root-finding, numerical linear algebra, numerical differentiation & integration, and solving initial- and boundary-value problems numerically. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 3700 - Object Orientation


    Prerequisite(s): CS 1350 .
    Object oriented methods of design, documentation and implementation. Implementation of examples in a high-level programming language. Polymorphism, inheritance, software reuse are studied and practiced. Students will learn to develop and implement software systems using object oriented techniques. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 3800 - Data Structures & Algorithms


    Prerequisite(s): CS 2410 ; CS 1350 .
    A study of methods for implementing data structures such as: lists, linked lists, nary trees, AVL-trees, b-trees, tries, and graphs. Study and analysis of well-known algorithms. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 4000 - Computer Science Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or administrative approval.
    Study of the current ethical and professional issues in computer science. Student research and seminar presentations are required. Credit(s): 1
  
  • CS 4500 - Software Engineering


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): CS 3800 .
    The theory and practice of software engineering. Software development methodologies, object oriented design, data abstraction, the software life cycles. Term project required. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 4600 - Organization of Programming


    Prerequisite(s): CS 3700 .
    Formal language concepts and examples. Data types, structures, and features affecting static and dynamic storage allocation. Language features for program control, procedures, data transfer, block structures, and recursion. Run-time considerations. Interpretive languages. Lexical analysis and parsing. Programming assignments in available languages. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 4800 - Systems Software


    Prerequisite(s): CS 2100 ; CS 3800 .
    Software design techniques. Organization and management of software development. Design of assemblers and macroprocessors. Review of lexical analysis and parsing, general compiler design, techniques of machine-independent code generation and optimization. Loader schemes and design. At least one large software project. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 4950 - Computer Science Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
    The internship course requires a professional field experience that incorporates previous coursework in computer science. The student will also be required to participate in a seminar program discussing the relationship of previous course work to the actual operations in industry. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • CS 4960 - CS Senior Project


    Prerequisite(s): CS 4500 .
    This capstone course requires the design of a solution to a problem using student developed software, complete with testing strategies and implementation of the solution. The design solution will involve the appropriate software development and testing methodologies. Students will produce software solutions conceptual system design subsystem analysis and characterization, consideration of technical impact including integration with existing systems, and the production of technical documentation for the design. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CS 4990 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of computer science. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • CS 5500 - Advanced Database Systems


    Prerequisite(s): CS 2010 CS 2410 CS 2500  all with C or higher.
    Explores a broad range of information security controls used to protect databases against compromises of their confidentiality, integrity and availability. Emphasis is placed on securing the database systems themselves, and the programs/functions and data within them. Topics include access control, auditing, authentication, encryption, integrity controls, backups and application security. Credit(s): 3

Criminal Justice

  
  • CJ 1100 - Intro to the Criminal Justice Systems


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A survey of the criminal justice system of the United States. The course will examine broad concepts that guide and direct the system of justice in contemporary society and the explore the components of the system: the police, the courts and corrections. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 1150 - Introduction to Law Studies


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is a survey of the American legal system, the substantive and procedural law of Indiana, and the role of the professional in the legal profession. Topics include an overview of professional ethics, the court system, procedural and substantive law, and basic legal analysis. This entry-level course is a prerequisite for all law courses in the Paralegal and Pre-Law programs. The purpose of the course is to build a foundation of basic knowledge for subsequent, more specialized courses. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 1300 - The Police in America


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    An examination of the police as a component of the American criminal justice system. Beginning with an exploration of the historical evolution of the police, learners will explore contemporary issues and emerging challenges that face this important unit of social control in our nation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 1400 - Corrections in America


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    Beginning with a historical overview of the American criminal justice system, this class covers the rationale for punishment and the administration and operational aspects of prison and jail functions at the local, state and federal levels. Issues related to probation, parole, community corrections. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 2300 - Substantive Criminal Law


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    The evolution of substantive law in America from its British and common-law traditions. The learner’s examination of this topic will include the limitations and ambiguity of the substantive law. This course may utilize the Indiana Criminal Code as one model of substantive law and may be taught using the case study method. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 2400 - Understanding Procedural Law


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    The development of an understanding of the application of the substantive law from a procedural perspective. There will be a course focus on significant U.S. Supreme Court cases that have described the boundaries of practice for the police, courts and corrections. This course may be taught using the case study method. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 2500 - Basics of Criminal Investigation


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    A general theoretical framework for the practice of investigating criminal acts. The components of all investigations; crime scene protocol, collection and preservation of physical evidence, sources of information, and interview and interrogation will be among the topics explored. Investigative features of particular crimes (homicide, robbery, rape, larceny, motor vehicle theft, etc.) will also be a focus of this class. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 2600 - Laws of Evidence


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2300  or CJ 2400 .
    The law of evidence is the system of rules and standards by which the admission of proof at the trial of a criminal action is regulated. This course includes topics related to the investigation and adjudication process in criminal cases, including collection of evidence and presentation of evidence at arraignments, preliminary hearings, suppression hearings, and trials, with emphasis on types of evidence admissible in a criminal action. This course may be taught using the case study method, with an emphasis on class participation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3100 - A System of Juvenile Justice


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100  or HS 1200  for Human Services Majors.
    The juvenile justice system in the United States operates in a manner that is slightly different from the adult components of the system. This course will provide an overview of a system that structures the way children are dealt with in regard to delinquency, abuse, neglect and dependency. Methods of addressing the prevention of delinquency and trends in delinquency will also be examined. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3200 - Understanding Criminal Behavior


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    This is a psychology and criminal justice course with a specific focus on criminal behavior using a psychosocial approach. More specifically we will be utilizing psychological, psychiatric and sociological approaches to examine why individuals commit criminal and delinquent acts. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3300 - Victimology


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on emerging areas in the field, such as the consequences of victimization and empowering victims. The concentration will be on both traditional and modern approaches to victims’ issues and concentrates on issues affecting both victims and victim service providers. The course will follow the general guideline of the text, however, and quite frequently, we will move outside of the text for material. Students will be responsible for topics covered both in and out of the text. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3510 - Community-Oriented Policing


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1300 .
    Focus on community-oriented policing and problem solving using criminal justice theoretical based approaches. The course will follow the general guideline of the text, however, and quite frequently, we will move outside of the text for material. Students will be responsible for topics covered both in and out of the text. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3520 - Crime Scene Investigation


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on the techniques and methods of crime scene investigation focusing on practical suggestions as well as theoretical viewpoints of the field. Topics include: fundamentals of preliminary investigation, identification, protection, and collection of evidence, sketching and photographing the crime scene, interpreting blood stain evidence, fingerprinting techniques. Students will be responsible for topics covered both in and out of the text and the lab portion of the course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3530 - Restorative Justice


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 3100 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on restorative justice. A specific focus will be on theoretical roots of the restorative justice movement and methods and practices in the field. Case studies will be used to facilitate student learning. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3620 - Forensic Science & Criminalistics


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2500 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on the nature and laboratory analysis of physical evidence. Topics include: collection of physical evidence, examination of evidence and the nature of different types of physical evidence. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 3700 - Ethics & Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    This is a course with a focus on ethical theories and their consideration in the field of criminal justice. Specific attention will be paid to the application of these theories and the ethical development of criminal justice practitioners. Topics will also include current ethical issues and their relationship to ethical theories and decisions. Students will be responsible for topics covered both in and out of the text and the lab portion of the course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4110 - Law Enforcement Planning Process


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1300 .
    A focus on policy and planning issues in the law enforcement environment. The learner will be exposed to the need for planned change and planned change models. Learners will then be required to identify a problem or law enforcement policy issue and develop a plan to impact that issue. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4120 - Death Investigation


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2500 .
    This course is designed to briefly cover how to recognize and investigate violent, suspicious or unexpected deaths. The student will learn to develop the essential facts regarding the death scene, medical history and other information that assists in the determination of a person’s cause and manner of death. The course will cover the 29 national guidelines set forth by the National Institutes of Justice as essential for a coordinated, efficient and complete death investigation. Basic crime scene investigation techniques will be stressed, along with the importance of crime scene and body evidence, however, this course emphasizes the medical aspects of death investigation and is not designed to be a “homicide seminar”. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4130 - Probation & Parole Services & Care


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1400 .
    The criminal justice system is comprised of three major components: police, courts, and corrections. Corrections is made up of both institutional and community-based agencies. This course will take an in-depth examination of the community-based strategies of probation and parole from both a historical perspective and what is currently being utilized today. This examination will explore the duties and objectives of contemporary probation and parole agencies in the United States today and tracks the progress of an individual through each phase of the community-based systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4210 - Police Organization & Management


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1300 .
    An in-depth examination of the administrative and leadership practices necessary in the operation of a contemporary police organization. In part, this course will demonstrate and discuss the application of modern management theory in the police environment. The focus here is on the operation of an urban police department (100+ officers) and the functional components of such an agency. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4220 - Criminal Profiling


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2500 ; CJ 3200 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on criminal profiling utilizing psychological and criminal justice based approaches. The class will concentrate on the processes of identifying personality traits, behavioral tendencies, geographical location and demographic variables of an offender based on characteristics of a crime. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4230 - Corrections Counseling


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 ; CJ 1400 .
    This is a course with a specific focus on treatment and counseling approaches to offender rehabilitation. The emphasis is on different types of treatment for juvenile and adult offenders. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4320 - Fundamentals of Crime Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2500 .
    An overview of the variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns and trends as they occur in contemporary society. The learner will also be exposed to the basic stages of crime analysis: collection of data, the collation of that data, analysis of data, dissemination of data, and feedback and evaluation of the end users of crime analysis data. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4700 - Transnational Organized Crime


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
    The course provides a unique overview of transnational organized crime in each continental region of the world. Specific attention will focus on the examination of how criminal groups use systematic violence and corruption to achieve their goals. Crimes to be discussed include money laundering, human smuggling, cybercrime, trafficking of humans, drugs, weapons, body parts and nuclear material. Discussion will be directed on how transnational crime ring activities weaken economies and financial systems and undermine democracy. Discussion will also focus on how these groups upset peace and stability of nations worldwide, often using bribery, violence or terror to achieve their goals. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CJ 4950 - Criminal Justice Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the Criminal Justice program.
    Permits students to participate in an internship with a criminal justice agency for credit hours. A student earns one(1) credit hour for every forty(40) hours the student reports to the sponsoring agency. Credit(s): 3-15
  
  • CJ 4960 - Senior Capstone: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 1100 .
    The course examines the United States criminal justice system and the criminal justice system of other nations. Using a descriptive approach, the four primary components of criminal justice systems of a number of nations will be studied and compared and contrasted with those same components in the enforcement structure; the judicial system include: sources and principles of law; the law enforcement structure; the judicial system; and, corrections. The course is a required capstone course for students in the pre-law major that integrates an understanding of all of the components of the U.S. criminal justice system by comparing and contrasting those components with those components of other nations. Credit(s): 3

Cybersecurity

  
  • CYS 1100 - Introduction to Cybersecurity


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The students will explore the field of Cybersecurity focusing on the technical and managerial aspects of the discipline. Students will be introduced to the basic terminology, concepts, and best practices of computer/network security and the roles and responsibilities of management/security personnel. The students will learn the technologies used and techniques involved in creating a secure computer networking environment including authentication and the types of attacks against an organization.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 2100 - Network & Web Security Analysis


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): CYS 1100 .
    Offers in-depth coverage of all the models, protocols, services, and standards that govern TCP/IP and web protocols that guide its behavior on modern networks. As a hands-on course, providing students with firsthand experience in installing, configuring, analyzing, using, and managing TCP/IP and web protocols on a network. These systems act as a line of defense, helping protect company assets from attacks. In this course, student gain a thorough grounding in the network and web intrusion detection using programming and third party/open source applications to capture and audit security logs.   Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 2300 - Defensive CyberOps and Audit


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 2100 NET 2300 
    Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems are critical components of well-designed network architectures. These systems act as a line of defense, helping protect company assets from attacks. In this course, students gain a thorough grounding in the design, implementation, and administration of IDSes/IPSes, as well as practical, hands-on experience working with them. In addition, students analyze various attack signatures and the network traffic these systems collect.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 3200 - Digital Forensics


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 1100 NET 1500 .
    Provides students with an understanding of the detailed methodological approach to computer forensics, evidence analysis, digital evidence acquisition/handling, and analysis in a forensically sound manner. Students will acquire hands-on experience with various forensic investigation techniques and standard tools necessary to successfully carry-out a computer forensic investigation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 3500 - Offensive CyberOps & Vulnerability


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 3200 
    The students will demonstrate their skills in planning and scoping a penetration testing engagement in an ethical manner. They will document identified flaws and vulnerabilities through various methods of vulnerability testing, including and not limited to foot printing, attack surface, discovery, and attack vectors. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 4100 - Cybersecurity Project I


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 3200  or CYS 3500 .
    This is the first of the projects for the Cybersecurity program. Project I will address instructor/student project in one of the following pathways: 1.) CyberOps; 2.) Digital Forensics; 3.) Network Engineering; 4.) Computer Science. Upon completion students, with the instructor will define a scenario(s) creating in a lab to be able to analyze a cybersecurity problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques. Documentation of the scenario(s) and solution(s) is required.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 4200 - Cybersecurity Project II


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 4100 
    This is the first of the projects for the Cybersecurity program. Project II will address instructor/student project in one of the following pathways: 1.) CyberOps; 2.) Digital Forensics; 3.) Network Engineering; 4.) Computer Science. This class should be a deeper look into the scenario(s) that was started in the CYS 4100 Cybersecurity I class. This can be proposed by an industry problem/issue that as a sponsor for the project to resolved a real life problem. Upon completion students, with the instructor will define a problem/issue to be created in a lab to be able and using a combination of tools and techniques determine a solution. Documentation of the scenario(s) and solution(s) is required.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 4950 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): CYS 3500 ; Advisor approval.
    This course combines professional field experience as a member of an organization with classroom topics and principles of Cybersecurity. In addition to the work experience, the student will also participate in a seminar program discussing the relationship of previous coursework to actual operations in industry. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with a first-hand involvement with the field of Cybersecurity. Students will acquire useful marketable skills and demonstrate the knowledge accumulated in their coursework. In addition, students will gain an awareness of the technical and business skills that professionals employ and foster the students’ own sense of confidence and competence in the professional world.  Credit(s): 6
  
  • CYS 4990 - Special Topics in Cybersecurity


    Prerequisite(s): Advisor approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of Cybersecurity. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • CYS 5100 - Principles of Cybersecurity


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course presents the principles of information/computer/network security, students will learn and understand how these principles are integrated into the systems life. Students will gain knowledge/ broad overview of various information security concepts, requirements, threat actors, malwares, vulnerabilities, cryptographic techniques and countermeasures. The students will learn the technologies used and techniques involved in creating a secure computer networking environment including authentication and the types of attacks against an organization. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 5200 - Enterprise Network Security


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course offers in-depth coverage of all the models, protocols, services, and standards that govern TCP/IP and web protocols that guide its behavior on modern networks. Students will get hands-on experience in various aspects of network security like installing, configuring, analyzing and using TCP/IP and various web protocols. These security systems can be used within various organizations irrespective of their business domain and will act as a line of defense, helping protect various company assets from attacks. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 5750 - Cybersecurity Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course covers topics related threat and vulnerability management, security operations and monitoring, compliance assessment, software and systems security and Incident response. This course is intended to provide students with knowledge needed to leverage intelligence and threat detection techniques, analyze and interpret data, identify and address vulnerabilities, suggest preventative measures, effectively respond to and recover from incidents  Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 5900 - (ISC)2 HCISPP - Healthcare Security and Privacy


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course covers topics required to implement, manage or assess the appropriate security and privacy controls of a healthcare organization. This course is intended to provide students with knowledge needed to manage security of health care data, ensure compliance and perform risk analysis of an organization. Students will be able to identify and describe various legal and regulatory requirements for healthcare information, also describe, various security and privacy concepts in relation to healthcare and perform risk analysis of an organization. Credit(s): 3
  
  • CYS 6800 - Applied Cybersecurity Operations


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Based on the knowledge gained in other courses of this certification, students will focus on working on a cybersecurity problem in the domain of their interest i.e., Healthcare or Information Systems, this problem can be sourced from academia or corporate enterprise. Depending upon the identified by the student their solution can be research oriented or development oriented. Students will have to perform precise formulation of the identified problem, research or implement a solution.  Credit(s): 3

Economics

  
  • ECON 2200 - Macroeconomics


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1025  or higher.
    A study of the overall economic system with emphasis upon gross domestic product, fiscal policy and monetary policy, the budget and banking. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ECON 2210 - Microeconomics


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1025  or higher.
    A study of the economic system. Supply and demand, competition, pricing policies, wage and rent determination, and government regulation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ECON 3140 - Money, Banking, and Capital Markets


    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2200 .
    This course provides an analysis of the financial systems of central banks, private banks, and other sources and users of financial capital. Topics include monetary theory, central banking and monetary policy, interest rate determination, inflation, financial intermediaries, and international financial markets. Credit(s): 3

Education

  
  • EDS 406 - Education Assessment


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 525 - Collaborative Classrooms and Schools


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 568 - Responsive Classroom Management


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 602 - Reading Methods


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 603 - Reading Methods


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 606 - Special Education Assessment


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 607 - Methods of Secondary Instruction


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 610 - Literacy for All Learners


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 611 - Literacy in Content Areas


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 613 - Collaborative Models of Behavior Management


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 615 - Language and Social Skills


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 626 - Functional Curriculum/Assistive Technology


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 677 - Math & Science Methods


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 678 - ELA & SS Methods


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 690 - Elementary Clinical Practicum


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EDS 691 - Elementary Clinical Internship


    Course taken through partnership with the University of St. Francis. Credit(s): 3

Electrical Engineering

  
  • EE 2050 - Overview of Electricity and Electronics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055 .
    An introductory course in electricity and electronics for non-electrical engineering students and computer science majors. This course extends the student’s knowledge of electrical components and circuits, resistive circuits, AC and DC network analysis methods such as nodal and loop analysis techniques. Operational amplifiers and their applications such summing, and voltage comparators are introduced. Moreover, this course covers topics in capacitance, inductance, and diodes. Applications of diodes such as voltage multiplier circuits and voltage spike suppression are discussed. Applications of AC circuits such as alternators and ac motors are introduced. Credit(s): 3

Electrical Engineering Technology

  
  • EET 1100 - Electronic Circuits I


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1030 .
    This is the first course in a two course sequence on the fundamentals of circuit analysis. Topics include Ohm’s Law, power, Kirchhoff’s voltage law, Kirchhoff’s current law, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers. Simulations with a pSpice simulator will be introduced. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 1150 - Electronic Circuits I Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 1100 .
    This lab covers the basics of electronic measurement techniques. Digital multimeters, function generators, and oscilloscopes will be introduced. Tolerance and significant figures will be emphasized. Protoboarding and soldering techniques will be introduced. Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 1200 - Electronic Circuits II


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1100 Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1055 .
    This is the second course in a three course sequence on fundamentals of circuit and electronic analysis. Topics include AC analysis, transformers, and fundamentals of filters. More advanced techniques of pSpice simulation will be studied. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 1250 - Electronic Circuits II Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 1200 .
    Measurement and analysis of operational amplifiers, filters. and transistors will be studied. Network analyzers and frequency analysis will be introduced. Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 1300 - Digital Circuits


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1030 .
    Fundamentals of digital circuits and logic will be discussed. Topics include binary numbers, Boolean algebra, digital logic gates, and Karnaugh maps. Differences in power requirements for digital circuits will be discussed. Fundamentals of digital simulation using a pSpice based simulator will be discussed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 1350 - Digital Circuits Lab


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1150 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 1300 .
    This is an introductory lab in the measurement and analysis of digital circuits. Clock generation and analysis will be analyzed. Logic gates, counters, and shift registers wi11 be investigated. Debugging of circuits will be discussed. Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 2000 - Technical Writing


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    Develop communication skills and learn written genres specific to scientific and engineering fields, such as technical descriptions, reports, proposals, specifications, and instructions. Interpret and employ mathematical, visual, and tabulated data in written formats. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2050 - Measurement Technology & Report Writing


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1250 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 2000 .
    Advanced measurement techniques and debugging of circuits will be discussed. Open and closed loop measurements will be conducted. Communicate measurements and test data effectively in written reports.  Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 2150 - Electronic Circuits III


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1200 
    This course covers the theory and operation of analog electronic devices and circuits. Diodes, bipolar junction (BJT) transistors and MOSFETs are discussed. Students are introduced to the use of these devices as circuit elements. Basic application circuits such as; Power supplies, Clippers, Clampers, and Multipliers are studied. Troubleshooting of circuits with diodes and transistors will also be covered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2200 - Intro to PLC’s


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1300 .
    This course provides and introduction to PLC programming and ladder logic. Interconnection of components and peripheral devices will be studied. Structured programming, debugging and the use of PC-based software will be discussed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2250 - Intro to PLC’s Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 2200 .
    This PLC’s Lab provides hands-on experience on developing Ladder logic programs. The curriculum allows students to work on Allen Bradly Connected Components Workbench (CCW) and learn how to connect I/O devices. Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 2300 - Electrical Machines


    Prerequisite(s): EET 1200 .
    Fundamentals of electrical machines are covered in this course. Topics in power generation and transmission are discussed. Residential and Industry applications of motors are discussed. Installation and safety are also covered in this course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2400 - PCB Layout and Fabrication


    Prerequisite(s): EET 2000 ; EET 2050 .
    This course covers the process to develop a prototype board from a circuit diagram. Students will use PC-software to create padstacks and footprints for electrical components. Students will prepare Gerber files for etching multi-layer boards with silk screen and soldermask layers. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2500 - Electricity & Electrical Machines


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055 PH 1100 .
    An introductory course in electrical science for non-electrical engineering students with emphasis on fundamentals of electricity and electrical machines - via lecture, demonstration and laboratory experiments.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2700 - Advanced PLC


    Prerequisite(s): EET 2250 .
    This course provides advanced topics in PLC, such as function block diagram, program control instructions, data manipulation instructions, math instructions, PLC installation practice, editing and troubleshooting, and processes control. Credit(s): 3
  
  • EET 2710 - Advanced PLC Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EET 2700 .
    This lab provides allows students to have hands on experience on advanced topics in PLC, such as function block diagram, program control instructions, data manipulation instructions, math instructions (ADD, SUB, MUL, DIV, CMP), PLC installation practice, editing and troubleshooting. Credit(s): 1
  
  • EET 2974 - Capstone Project


    Prerequisite(s): EET 2000 ; EET 2050 .
    The capstone course is designed for students to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge from the program. The course requires students to build and test a system. A technical document of their findings will be created. Credit(s): 2

Electrical & Computer Engineering

  
  • ECE 1000 - Introduction to Circuit Simulation and PCB Design


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1090 .
    This course introduces students to circuit simulation and printed circuit board (PCB) layout.  Students will perform simple DC and transient Spice based simulations.  Footprints and padstacks will be created from mechanical drawings for electrical components.  Layouts considerations including trace width, component placement, and heat dissipation will be considered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ECE 1100 - C Programming


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 1500 
    Introduces undergraduate students to topics of programming for solving engineering programs, using the C programming language. It familiarizes students with the process of computational thinking and the translation of real-life engineering problems to computation problems. Topics include logical statements, loop, pointers, files, data types, and standard i/o. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ECE 2000 - Digital System Design I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1200  or equivalent.
    An introductory course in the analysis and design of digital systems. The study of Boolean Algebra as a tool to analyze and synthesize switching networks consisting of logic gates and implementing combinational logic circuits, Karnaugh mapping, and state reduction. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ECE 2010 - Digital System Design I Lab


    Prerequisite(s): ECE 2000 
    This course introduces the basic concepts in designing and prototyping of digital logic circuits. Logic gates on integrated circuits (ICs) are used to understand the behavior and functionality of any modern digital systems.  Simulation of digital circuits is introduced. Credit(s): 1
 

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