Jul 24, 2024  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3+1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Mathematics

  
  • MA 1055 - Applied Trigonometry


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030  with a grade of C or higher.
    Basic concepts of trigonometry, trigonometric functions, fundamental trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, applications of trigonometry, and vectors. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 1090 - Precalculus


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1010  with a grade of C or higher or appropriate placement.
    This course prepares students for a traditional engineering calculus sequence. Topics include: Algebraic operations; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs; trigonometric functions, identities, and graphs of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; solving triangles. Credit(s): 4
  
  • MA 1100 - Applied Calculus I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a grade of C or higher.
    Limits, continuity, and derivatives are the focus of this course. The derivatives of polynomials, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions are studied. Techniques of differentiation include using appropriate rules and implicit differentiation. Applications include related rates, differentials, optimization and curve analysis. Basic anti-derivatives are also covered including the substitution technique. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 1110 - Applied Calculus II


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1100  with a grade of C or higher or equivalent.
    Integration, series, multivariable calculus, differential equations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 1200 - Calculus I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1090  with a grade of C or higher.
    Limits, continuity, and derivatives are the focus of this course. The derivatives of polynomials, rational, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions are studied. Techniques of differentiation include using appropriate rules, implicit and logarithmic differentiation. Applications include related rates, differentials, optimization and curve analysis. Basic anti-derivatives are also covered including the substitution technique. Credit(s): 4
  
  • MA 1210 - Calculus II


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1200  with a grade of C or higher or equivalent.
    Using integration techniques to find antiderivatives and solve applications. Solving separable first order differential equations. Analyzing the convergence of an infinite sequence. Determining whether an infinite series converges absolutely or conditionally, or diverges. Determining the interval of convergence of a power series. Analyzing parametric and polar curves. Credit(s): 4
  
  • MA 1520 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is a study of mathematical concepts, procedures, and processes found in the elementary math curriculum grades K-8. Students will study real number properties, patterns, operations, algebraic reasoning, probability, statistics, methods of counting and problem solving utilizing an activity oriented approach. The course will emphasize the developmental nature of elementary mathematics content. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2010 - Foundations of Statistics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1015  (AS-IT majors only) or MA 1025  or OL 3300  or higher with a grade of C or higher.
    The purpose of the course is to help students understand just how much data and statistical analysis have to say about their lives and the world around us. This course emphasizes concepts and statistical thinking rather than computation. The course will focus on statistical concepts and methods for producing data and organizing data. It also will explore elements of probability used to describe chance, variation and risk. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2025 - Statistical Problem Solving


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1025  or MA 1030  or MA 1090  with a grade of C or higher or equivalent.
    This course will include basic statistical terminology, mean, median, mode and designing experiments. In addition, standard deviation, variance, normal distribution, probabilities, correlation, statistical inference and sampling distribution will be covered. Additional topics include regression analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and one and two sample statistics are also to be included. All topics should be used in appropriate application solving applied problems with appropriate technology. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2100 - Differential Equation & Linear Algebra


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210  with a grade of C or higher.
    This course covers matrix algebra, transposition, and inversion. Solving systems of linear equations with matrices. The definition, properties, and applications of determinants are studied. Vectors in n-dimensional space are analyzed. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are discussed thoroughly. Techniques for solving fist order and higher order differential equations are studied in detail. Systems of differential equations are solved using eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications of differential equations are discussed. Credit(s): 4
  
  • MA 2150 - Linear Algebra


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210  with a grade of C or higher.
    Theories of systems of linear equations, determinants, vectors in the plane and space, vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Also, various application of linear algebra will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2200 - Calculus III


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210  with a grade of C or higher.
    This course covers multi-dimensional and vector calculus. Different coordinate systems in two and three dimensions, planes and other surface are covered. Vector operations and vector-valued functions are covered thoroughly. Partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and multiple integrals are covered and applied to problems. Classic theorems from vector calculus are studied. Credit(s): 4
  
  • MA 2300 - Differential Equations


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2150  with a grade of C or higher.
    This course studies ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear and non-linear equations, and systems of differential equations. Laplace transform methods are also covered. An overview of existence and uniqueness theorems is given. Applications to the sciences and engineering are included. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2410 - Discrete Structures


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1110  or MA 1210 CS 1300  or ECE 1100 
    Induction, Big-Oh analysis and recurrence relations, mathematical aspects of trees, mathematical aspects of sets, relations, graph theory, automata and regular expressions, context-free grammars, propositional and predicate logic. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2430 - Probability & Statistics for Engineers


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210  with a grade of C or higher.
    An introductory course in probability and statistics for engineering majors. Concepts of probability are covered, followed by study of single variable and multivariate random variables and their probability distributions. Elementary statistics, estimation theory, and hypothesis testing are considered in detail, followed by a short introduction to random processes. Regression analysis is briefly considered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 2990 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Sciences.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of mathematics. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • MA 3000 - History of Mathematics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1100  or MA 1200 .
    A survey of the development of mathematics through the ages, from ancient Mesopotamian to the modern era. Significant stages in the development of different branches of mathematics, such as geometry, algebra, and calculus will be addressed. Ancient mathematical techniques and counting systems, as well as contributions from underrepresented groups and from diverse cultures will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 3200 - Graph Theory


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2100  or MA 2150 .
    This course focuses on the mathematical theory of graphs; applications and algorithms will be discussed. Topics include trees, connectivity, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, matchings, edge and vertex colorings, distance, connectivity, planar graphs, directed graphs, multi-graphs, and network flows. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 3300 - Introductory Real Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2200 .
    This course develops the theory of calculus rigorously from the basic principles. Topics include the structure of the real numbers, open and closed sets, sequences, limits, convergence, continuity, derivatives, integration, and infinite series. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 4100 - Introductory Complex Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2200 .
    This course is a basic introduction to the study of complex-valued functions and their properties. Topics include complex numbers, the complex plane, and elementary complex-valued functions. Analytic functions, complex integration, complex series and residue theory constitute the major topics to be studied. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 4300 - Modern Algebra


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2150 .
    An introduction to the principles and concepts of modern abstract algebra. Topics will include groups, rings, and fields. The course focuses on the process of mathematical abstraction, the formulation of algebraic axiom systems, and the development of an abstract theory from these axiomatic systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MA 4990 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of mathematics. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Mechanical Engineering

  
  • ME 2050 - Overview of Machines and Fluids


    Co-requisite(s): MA 1100 ; PH 2100 .
    An overview of mechanical engineering topics, exposing students to mechanical power transmission, HVAC systems, and internal combustion engines. Students will learn basic operation and design selection of generators, compressors, pumps, motors, and engines. Also, students will learn fluid flow characteristics of heating, refrigeration, and geothermal systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 3110 - Theory of Machines


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2020 .
    Basic static, kinematic and dynamic analysis of plane motion mechanisms. Graphical and analytical solutions for basic mechanisms. Power equation, equation of motion. Balancing, rotating and reciprocating masses. Critical speeds of shafts. Computer-aided kinematic design. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 3200 - Thermodynamics I


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3500 ; PH 1300 .
    Macroscopic thermodynamics: state, energy, entropy and equilibrium. First-law and second-law analysis for engineering applications. Computer applications. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 3400 - Mechanical Engineering Design I


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3100 .
    This course is intended to give students a working knowledge to design and analyze machine components and structures. Stress analysis and deflection analysis of various mechanical components including pressure vessels, rotating rings and disks, press and shrink fits, curved beams, and contact stresses will be discussed. Fundamentals of statistical considerations in design will be reviewed. Static and dynamic failure theories will be discussed and applied to the design of machine components. Specific design problems will be set during the semester. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 3405 - Finite Element Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 3600 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ME 3400 .
    Students will use 3-D CAD modeling skills to perform finite element analysis on engineering components. Design problems will be drawn from solid mechanics and fluid mechanics. Credit(s): 1
  
  • ME 3410 - Mechanical Engineering Design II


    Prerequisite(s): ME 3400 .
    This course is a continuation of Mechanical Engineering Design I and is intended to give students a working knowledge to design, analyze and synthesize machine components and systems, including bolted and welded joints, mechanical springs, rolling contact bearings, gears, clutches, brakes, couplings and shafts. In addition, students work in groups on design projects and design a machine to perform a task of their choosing. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 4210 - Thermal Science Investigations


    Prerequisite(s): ME 3200 .
    Continuation of Thermodynamics I. First-law and second- law applications. Gas mixtures, combustion, chemical equilibrium, power cycles, refrigeration cycles and energy conversion systems. Major focus on open-ended, laboratory design exercises involving thermodynamics cycle analysis that integrates previously acquired fluid mechanics and heat transfer principles and skills. Credit(s): 4 (3+1)
  
  • ME 4260 - Heat Transfer


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3500 Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ME 3200 .
    Conduction, convection and radiation. Empirical equations for convective heat transfer. Heat exchangers, condensation and boiling. Computer iterative solutions. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ME 4270 - Heat Transfer Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ME 4260 .
    Experimental studies in the analysis and design of heat transfer equipment. Credit(s): 1
  
  • ME 4960 - ME Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000 ; EM 3500 ; ME 3110 ; ME 3400 ; ME 3405 ; Senior standing.
    The presentation of a creative engineering design solution to a real-world physical problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science, and mechanical engineering theory. Students will aim to produce systems that will be safe, cost-effective, and are technically sound solutions to the problem. Coursework will include: establishing specifications, conceptual system design, subsystem analysis and characterization, equipment sourcing, and the production of technical documentation for the design. Periodic progress reports to the technical advisor are required. Credit(s): 2
  
  • ME 4961 - ME Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): ME 3200 ; ME 3410 ; ME 4260 ME 4960 .
    The implementation of the design solution prepared in Mechanical Engineering Senior Project I. The course will involve construction and test of the project hardware and software. The project concludes with a hardware demonstration and an oral presentation to faculty and students in the department. Project students will also produce a formal written report. Credit(s): 2
  
  • ME 4990 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of mechanical engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Mechanical Engineering Technology

  
  • MET 1010 - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Technology


    Prerequisite(s): None. 
    This course introduces students to the realm of engineering and technology. It explains what the profession is, what important roles engineering technology plays, how it is different from other major professions in society, and the career opportunities for engineering technology students. The course also introduces the basic principles of engineering in terms or problem solving approach, methodology, knowledge, and skill involved.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 2000 - ME Measurement and Instrumentation


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a C or higher.
    Laboratory and lecture in instrumentation and measurement for mechanical engineering technology students. Applications for the sensing of such variables as pressure, temperature, mass flow, and displacement. Particular attention to the applicability and sensitivity of instruments. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 2100 - ME Instrumentation & Automation Control


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a grade of C or higher.
    Laboratory and lecture in instrumentation and measurement for mechanical engineering technology students. Applications for the sensing of such variables as pressure, temperature, mass flow, and displacement. Particular attention to the applicability and sensitivity of instruments.  Credit(s): 3 (1+2)
  
  • MET 2700 - Basic Machining


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a grade of C or higher; EGR 2600 ; EGR 2710 .
    Review machine tools and how they are used to create finished products. Considers cost, quality, quantity, part interchangeability, and workplace safety. Includes set up and operation of multiple machine tools, both manual and computer controlled. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 2800 - Introduction to Machining


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a grade of C or higher; EGR 2600 . Co-requisite(s): EGR 2710 .
    Review machine tools and how they are used to create finished products. Considers cost, quality, quantity, part interchangeability, and workplace safety.  Includes setup and operation of multiple machine tools, both manual and computer controlled. This course includes practice activities in the machining lab. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 3110 - Applied Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2050 
    Kinematics of particles. Kinematics of rigid bodies. Newtons laws of motions, energy, and momentum. Basic static, kinematic and dynamic analysis of plane motion mechanisms. Graphical and analytical solutions for basic mechanisms. Computer-aided kinematic design. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 3400 - Applied Machine Elements


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2050  with a grade of C or higher. 
    The design and analysis of machine components with emphasis on safety factors based on various failure theories in consideration of static and fluctuating loads, stress concentration, and other factors affecting failure. A study of standard machine elements such as shafts, gears, screws, springs, couplings, power screws and bearings; their application, operational behavior. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MET 3500 - Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2050 Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MET 3110 .
    Fluid statistics and dynamics. Laminar and turbulent flows. Use of the equations of motion in the study of fluid flows. Design of pipe networks. Turbomachinery. Hydraulic machines. Dimensional analysis. Experimental studies of fluids at rest and in motion. Hydraulic machines experiments. Credit(s): 3 (2+1)
  
  • MET 4260 - Applied Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2050 MET 3500 MA 1100 .
    This course introduces the concepts of energy, entropy and equilibrium. Heat transfer via conduction, convection, and radiation are discussed in great detail. Heat exchangers are introduced in the course. All of the course topics are enhanced by lab experiments. Credit(s): 3 (2+1)
  
  • MET 4960 - MET Senior Capstone Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000 ; MET 3110 ; MET 3400 ; MET 3500 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): IME 3040 ; MET 4260 .
    Develop an engineering design solution to a real world problem.  The design solution will involve the application of the mathematics, science, engineering and technology concepts from courses taken during the Mechanical Engineering Technology program.  The engineering design process should be followed to develop the design solution.  Required documentation includes a project proposal, a formal interim status report, and an interim status presentation. Credit(s): 2
  
  • MET 4961 - MET Senior Capstone Project II


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000 ; IME 3040 ; MA 1100 ; MET 3110 ; MET 3400 ; MET 3500 ; MET 4260 ; PH 2100 .
    Develop an engineering design solution to a real-world problem. The design solution will involve the application of the mathematics, science, engineering and technology concepts from courses taken during the Mechanical Engineering Technology program. The engineering design process should be followed to develop the design solution. Required documentation includes all applicable engineering drawings, a formal written report, and a formal oral presentation that includes a demonstration of the design solution. Credit(s): 3 (2+1)

Mechatronics & Robotics Engineering

  
  • MRE 3100 - Mechatronics


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 1710 .
    This course will provide students with basic concepts of dynamic response; fundamentals of electronic and logic circuits; fundamentals on sensors and instrumentation for strains, movements and fluid flow; actuators and power transmission devices; feedback control. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MRE 4100 - Robotics - Dynamics and Control


    Prerequisite(s): MET 2000 ; ECE 3100 .

    This course will introduce students in robotics, robot kinematics and inverse kinematics, trajectory planning, differential motion and virtual work principles, as well as in dynamics and control. Credit(s): 3

  
  • MRE 4960 - MRE Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): ME 3410 ; MRE 3100 ; MET 2000 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ECE 3700 .

    Preliminary capstone project course, introducing students to problem solving methodologies used in design, analysis and synthesis of robotics, mechatronics and automation; Students will explore, select, document,  write and present a project proposal. Credit(s): 2

  
  • MRE 4961 - MRE Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): MRE 4960 .
    Capstone project concluding course. Students will apply engineering principles and sciences to the design of systems or processes in Robotics, Mechatronics, or Automation; students will engage in the production of working prototypes or simulated models; they will write and present their final project reports. Credit(s): 2

Networking

  
  • NET 1100 - Introduction to Networking


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A survey of network fundamentals and telecommunications design as they relate to information systems. Topics covered include hardware, voice, data, video, and digital wireless infrastructure technologies. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 1200 - Network Design I


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This is the first of three courses designed to prepare the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate certification. In it students learn network terminology and protocols, and network standards. They learn the difference between LANs and WANs. The OSI and TCP/IP models are used to define networking. Students learn to design, install and test various types of network cables using the proper cabling tools. Students use multiple number bases and Boolean logic to determine hierarchical network addressing. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 1250 - Network Design II


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1200  with a grade of C or higher.
    This is the second of three courses designed to prepare the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate certification. In it students apply the network terminology and protocols, and network standards from NET1200. Router and switch configuration is covered. Students will design LAN and implement the designs using both physical equipment and network simulation programs. Outside lab time is required for a student to be successful in this course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 1500 - PC Hardware and Software Support


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Fundamental circuits and hardware course. This course explores the components, circuitry, peripherals and software systems required in a computer system. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 2000 - Windows Networking


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1200  with a grade of C or higher; CS 1500 .
    This course covers the planning, design and implementation of Microsoft Windows operating systems network architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively utilize Active Directory, Group Policy, resource management and security best practices. Scheduled and unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 2200 - Advanced Routing & Switching


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1250 .
    This is the third course in a sequence. In it students will learn advanced WAN theory and design, WAN protocols used for core access and connection. Multilayer switching in hierarchical settings is covered. Specific activities will include: designing a WAN, implementing the WAN by configuring routers, switches and security devices as needed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 2300 - Script Programming


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1300  or CS 1300 ; CS 1500 .
    This introductory programming course focusing on the use of scripting languages. Topics include structured programming concepts, interacting with Web sites, file systems, user authentication and content management. Emphasis will be placed on network management and administration tasks. Multiple scripting languages will be used. Lab/Project. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 2500 - Linux Networking


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1250 ; CS 1500 .
    Procuring, installing, managing and troubleshooting Linux networks on microcomputers. Topics include: configuring and securing network servers and workstations, creating and managing users and groups, using command line and graphical user interfaces, surveying and selecting available application software, managing a Web server. Scheduled and unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 2990 - Special Topics in Networking


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of networking. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • NET 3200 - Wireless & Mobile Communication


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1200  with a grade of C or higher.
    Fundamentals of wireless LANs and WANs. Focuses on the design, planning, implementation, operation and troubleshooting of wireless LANs; includes security and design best practices; also covers microwave, satellite, RF and new technologies. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 3300 - Network Security


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1250 .
    Provides the fundamentals of network security; students learn to design and implement security solutions that will reduce the risk of revenue loss and vulnerability. Combines hands-on labs with instructor and e-learning. Covers basic risk mitigation, standard vulnerabilities and helps students learn how to balance security with usability. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 3400 - Directed Studies in Networking


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1250 ; Junior standing.
    This course prepares students for the lifelong learning process that is required in technology fields. The student, in consultation with the instructor, chooses a specific area of expertise and then prepares to sit for an industry standard certification exam in that area. Students learn the importance of staying current in their field and verifying to others the level of their expertise. Students also will develop practices that work for them when studying in an independent environment. Curriculum, study materials and access to labs will be provided. Unscheduled lab. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 4000 - Networking Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or administrative approval.
    This course aims to put into perspective previous course work and examine the current state of the field. Students will research a 10-year history of the field as well as the current state in terms of hardware, software, business, employment and societal effects. From this study, students will project where the field will be 10 years hence. Students also will select a topic of current interest that has some ethical component and write a research paper about that topic. Credit(s): 1
  
  • NET 4100 - Network Design and Administration


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1200 .
    Administration of a computer network. Design, implementation, and management of computer networks using multi-user network operating systems. Allocating and managing network resources, sharing resources across a network, monitoring network traffic, security. Ethical issues. Unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 4200 - Advanced Server Systems


    Prerequisite(s): CS 1500 ; NET 2000 ; NET 2500 .
    This course examines current and emerging server technologies. Best practices for the design of the infrastructure are explored. Emphasis is placed on the planning and installing of a virtual server system with multiple operating systems. Both server and desktop requirements are covered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 4300 - Voice & Video Systems


    Prerequisite(s): NET 1250 .
    Concepts and design of multi-service IP communication systems including voice and video delivery. Covers VoIP (Voice over IP) protocols and standards, quality of service, traffic prioritization, congestion control, signaling and policy control. Bandwidth allocation and video delivery systems are addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 4900 - Networking Project


    Prerequisite(s): NET 4100 ; Senior standing.
    Practical hands-on work to utilize and put into perspective previous coursework. Students work through, from start to finish, an entire project similar to one they will be involved in upon entering the work force. Students are given a scenario that will cover an entire Internet/Intranet project. They will need to design and implement the project, document appropriately, and demonstrate viability. Credit(s): 3
  
  • NET 4990 - Special Topics in Networking


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of networking. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Organizational Leadership

  
  • OL 3000 - Employee Development


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2700 .
    This course is a study in current theories and concepts of employee development. Students will examine practical approaches to ensuring that employees develop the knowledge and skills to perform effectively in their jobs and advance in their careers. The course will look at the role of training and development, coaching, mentoring, and developmental planning as well as performance management, appraisal, and feedback. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 3200 - Managing Organizational Change & Continuous Improvement


    Prerequisite(s): OL 3000 .
    This course examines the role of change and continuous improvement in organizations. Students will be introduced to theoretical concepts involved with organizational change and continuous improvement and learning. They will also analyze the forces that drive organizations to change and examine processes for planning and implementing effective organizational change. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 3300 - Quantitative Decision-Making


    Prerequisite(s): OL 3200 MA 1020 .
    A course designed to give OL students the specific math background to understand, correlate, and analyze data. It covers mathematical operations, how to use a calculator effectively to solve organizational problems, equations, and graphs, simultaneous equations and their applications (i.e. breakeven analysis), simple regression and descriptive statistics (mean, median, mode, standard deviation, histograms and Pareto charts). Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 3400 - Financial Systems for Decision-Making


    Prerequisite(s): Business majors: OL 3300 . IS majors: MA 2025 . ENE and IME majors: IME 2110 .
    This course addresses the analysis of managerial planning and control systems. It examines the development and administration of operating reports, budgets, and financial support systems. Accounting vocabulary and financial statement analysis are also introduced, emphasizing financial information for effective organizational leadership. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 4000 - Strategic Planning


    Prerequisite(s): OL 3400 .
    This is a process oriented course that reviews planning activities such as developing a company mission, competitive analysis, company situation analysis, potential strategies supported by a traditional SWOT review, competitive advantage, growth scenarios, the role of setting specific objectives in implementing strategies, and financial projections. This course shows how to transform the company mission statement into an actionable plan. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 4100 - Qualitative Decision-Making


    Prerequisite(s): OL 4000 .
    A review of methods used to collect information to support business decisions, such as customer surveys, employee surveys, focus groups, competitive studies, and benchmarking. Topics include designing procedures to obtain unbiased data, scaling methods, and analysis and interpretation of data to produce credible results and recommendations. Emphasis is placed on intelligence necessary to support strategic planning activities and initiatives. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OL 4900 - Organizational Leadership Capstone


    Prerequisite(s): OL 4100 .
    A format of synthesis is implemented, bringing together the concepts and processes of the prior studies within the organizational leadership program. Emphasis is placed on viewing the organizational from a strategic management and integrated problem-solving perspective. Credit(s): 3

Physics

  
  • PH 1000 - Physical Science


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Introduction to basic ideas of physics, chemistry, and the nature of scientific inquiry, with an emphasis on learning about learning, and how elementary students think and learn about science. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PH 1100 - Fundamentals of Physics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): MA 1055 .
    Basic mechanics: vectors, kinematics in one and two dimensions, Newton’s Laws, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion. Laboratory is incorporated into the course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PH 1300 - General Physics I


    Prerequisite(s): High school physics or equivalent; MA 1100  or MA 1200  with a C or better.
    Basic mechanics: vectors, kinematics in one and two dimensions, Newton’s Laws, work, energy, momentum and rotational motion. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PH 1310 - General Physics I Laboratory


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): PH 1300 .
    Selected experiments in mechanics, including kinematics, Newton’s Laws, energy, momentum, and rotation. Use of computers for data acquisition and analysis. Credit(s): 1
  
  • PH 2100 - Fundamentals of Physics II


    Prerequisite(s): PH 1100  with a grade of C or higher.
    Basic electricity and magnetism, with emphasis on DC. Laboratory is incorporated into the course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PH 2300 - General Physics II


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1110  or MA 1210 ; PH 1300  with a C or better.
    Basic electricity and magnetism. Coulomb’s Law, electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, resistance, current, Ohm’s Law, magnetic fields and inductance; also harmonic motion, waves. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PH 2310 - General Physics II Laboratory


    Prerequisite(s): PH 1310 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): PH 2300 .
    Selected experiments in electricity, magnetism, and periodic motion. Use of computers in data acquisition and analysis. Credit(s): 1

Psychology

  
  • PSY 1700 - Introduction to Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The fundamental principles of psychology including, but limited to, research methodology, perception, development, motivation, consciousness, learning, thinking, stress management and social relationships. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 1750 - Human Growth and Development


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    A Life Span human development course which integrates biology, psychology, sociology, medicine, demography, economics and anthropology perspectives from conception to death. Emerging trends in research. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2000 - Understanding Diversity


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course explores race, gender, sexuality, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, and systemic influences. Emphasis is placed on the connection among individuals, institutions and cultural groups, and on the relatedness of individuals’ race, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class. Theoretical and philosophical frameworks and research are presented through readings and course materials drawn from education, psychology, sociology, American studies, cultural studies, health sciences and management. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2010 - Educational Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): CD 1100  with a grade C or better; PSY 1700 .
    This course applies the principles of psychology to an understanding of the dynamics of teaching behavior and learning behavior. Topics include current psychological theories and research that guides inquiry and decision-making in education. Topics surveyed include behavior, development, cognitive and language development, sociocultural diversity learning and instruction, including differentiation for learning and assessment. Emphasis is on early and middle childhood developmental needs. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2300 - Human Sexuality


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A comprehensive introduction to the biological, psychological, and cultural aspects of human sexuality. The study of human sexuality from youth to old age, including the development of gender identity, sexual orientation, sex roles and sexual dysfunction will be examined. This course will aide student’s exploration their own thinking, and biases surrounding sexual issues, with the goal of helping students develop a fuller an scientifically grounded understanding of human sexual behavior. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2510 - Theories of Counseling


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Introduces the historical and professional foundations of counseling as well as provides exposure to the process, skills of counseling, and the specialties engaged in the practice of counseling. Specific focus given to the theories of counseling. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2520 - Abnormal Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Abnormal behavior including major psychological disorders. Emphasis on various contemporary approaches to their understanding and treatment. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2760 - Theories of Personality


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Introduction to the study of how individuals are influenced by enduring inner factors and the development of personality over the course of a lifetime. Topics include biological trait theories, behavioral and cognitive social theories, and psychodynamic theories. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2780 - Social Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    A study of how thoughts, feelings, or behaviors of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others. Topics include attitude formation and attitude change, prejudice and discrimination, cooperation and competition, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, aggression and violence, social perception, group influences and environmental influences on social behavior. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 2990 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 
    Directed study in a special body of subject matter in psychology. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • PSY 3510 - Biopsychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 ; BIO 1110 , BIO 2710 /BIO 2720 , HSC 2010 , or HSC 2200 .
    Introduction to the study of mental processes and their effects on behavior. Measurement of biological variables which affect the quantitative or qualitative changes of specific psychological or behavioral variables. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3520 - Applied Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Exploration of the various roles and the functions of professional psychologists through an examination of the theoretical and practical applications of careers in psychology. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3530 - Sport Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Introduction to how psychological factors affect individual and team physical performance. How participation in sport and exercise  affect psychological development and health and well-being of the individual. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3730 - Aging


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Introduction to the process of aging, directed study in biological, psychological, and social factors affecting the elderly. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3750 - Interviewing Strategies for Helpers


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2510 .
    Fundamental interviewing strategies and techniques used to assist others in addressing interpersonal (and psychological) issues. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3770 - Assessment in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1025 .
    The basic concepts, terminology, and principles of assessment applicable to human services counseling are considered, with an emphasis on both written and oral assessment techniques. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 3780 - Research Methods and Statistics


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 ; MA 1025  with grade C or better; Junior standing.
    The principles, methods, and strategies useful in planning, designing, writing, and evaluating research studies in the behavioral sciences. Non-experimental research methods such as naturalistic observation, survey, correlation, field study, program evaluation and experimental research will be studied. Topics to be covered include: background research skills, hypothesis development, research methodology, descriptive statistics (using calculator or computer), and an introduction to probability. Additional topics include research designs, measurements, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, and the analysis of data. The use of computer statistical packages will be introduced. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 4000 - Ethics for Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is designed to examine ethical issues faced by individuals who will work in helping professions in the mental health and addictions fields. Students will explore common ethical dilemmas that occur in the helping professions as we as examine the most current ethical guidelines from professional organizations to develop an understanding of ethical problem solving. Students will also explore professional development issues related to working in helping professions. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PSY 4370 - Child Psychology Theory & Application


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1750 ; PSY 2520 .
    This advanced course will explore a developmental perspective to understanding child and adolescent normal and abnormal growth and development. Emphasis will be placed on creating a deeper understanding of the behavioral and developmental disorders that impact children and adolescents. The other main emphasis of the course will be to learn hands on techniques students can apply when working with children and/or adolescents in a variety of educational, recreational, or mental health settings. Credit(s): 3
 

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