Jul 18, 2024  
2018-2019 Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3 plus 1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Education

  
  • EDU 3000 - Methods of Teaching Reading and Language Arts


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; EDU 2010 ; ENG 1270 ; admission to Teacher Education Program. A limited criminal history background check is required before students can enter P-12 schools for observation, practicum, or teacher candidacy work.  These forms must be on file in the Director of Teacher Preparation’s office before students will be allowed to participate in any field experience. 
    Study of instructional strategies and design, implementation and evaluation of reading language arts curriculum for elementary students. Topics include subject-specific pedagogical methods and integrated instructional models, enhancing metalinguistic awareness, fundamentals of literacy and strategies for teaching core literacy skills. Diversity within the classroom setting is emphasized.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3120 - Methods for Teaching Math


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; EDU 2010 ; admission to Teacher Education Program.
    Prepares future teachers to understand and adapt to the rapid pace of mathematic and technological change. Students will be provided blueprints for teaching math. The content of this course is aligned with national math curriculum standards, and includes grade-appropriate sample lessons and strategies for inquiry-based, problem-based and cooperative learning; guidelines for creating performance tasks that have real-world applications; methods for using data-based assessment before, during and after learning; collection of templates, planners, checklists and graphic organizers; and materials that can be reproduced for classroom instruction. Students will engage in a field experience facilitated by university supervisors.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3160 - Teaching Methods for Science and Social Studies


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; EDU 2010 ; admission to Teacher Education Program.
    Teaching Methods for Science and Social Studies will prepare future teachers to understand and adapt to the rapid pace of integrated teaching and learning within the science and social studies curricula. Experiments, hands-on tasks, case studies, vignettes and project-based learning will provide a framework in which to engage in relevant content topics. Students will engage in a field experience facilitated by university supervisors. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3170 - Teaching Methods for Social Studies


    Teaching Methods for Social Sciences will prepare future teachers to understand and adapt to rapid pace of integrated teaching and learning with social studies curricula, including the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas. Hands-on tasks, case studies, vignettes, and project-based learning will provide a framework in which to engage in relevant content topics. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3180 - Teaching Methods for Science


    Teaching Methods for Science will prepare future teachers to understand and adapt to the rapid pace of integrated teaching and learning with the science curricula, integrating the fundamental concepts of physical, life, and earth/space sciences. Experiments, hands-on tasks, case studies, vignettes, and project-based learning will provide a framework in which to engage in relevant content topics. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3200 - Teaching Methods for Students with Special Needs


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; Admission to the teacher education program.
    A limited criminal history background check is required before students can enter P-12 schools for observation, practicum, or teacher candidacy work.  These forms must be on file in the Director of Teacher Preparation’s office before students will be allowed to participate in any field experience.
    Provides education students a deeper look into the profession of teaching. Areas covered include an overview of special education, the referral process and collaboration among those involved in the program. Students will be held accountable for working within the School of Education’s expectations, dispositions and teaching characteristics. Case studies, vignettes and projects will help students understand these areas of study as they relate to real-world issues in teaching. Other topics to be studied include an introduction to high-prevalence, low-incidence and other forms of exceptionality. Students will be given assignments that apply to their placements in school settings. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3250 - Testing and Assessment for Teaching


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; EDU 2010 ; admission to Teacher Education Program.
    Offers students tools for planning and delivering differentiated instruction. Use of data for pre-assessment, formative and summative assessment to increase student learning will be studied. Other topics include instructional strategies to increase student achievement and using data to create a positive classroom climate. Students will engage in a field experience facilitated by university supervisors. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3448 - Secondary Education Beginning Practicum


    Students will participate in a minimum of 40 hours in a secondary education classroom under the licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. Credit(s): 1 (1 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3449 - Elementary Beginning Practicum


    Students will participate in a minimum of 40 hours in an elementary classroom under the guidance of a licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. (0 plus 0) Credit(s): 1 (1 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3500 - Methods for Secondary Mathematics


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 EDU 2010   Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application. 
    This course emphasizes the integration of best practice pedagogy for mathematics instruction. The Indiana mathematics content and developmental standards are used as the source of content and organization for the course. Pre-service teachers will continue to develop competency in instructional planning, instructional implementation, including the use of academic language, assessment, developmentally appropriate practice, differentiated instruction and professionalism, including reflection. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3948 - Secondary Advanced Practicum


    Students will participate in a minimum of 80 hours in a secondary education classroom under the licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 3949 - Elementary Advanced Practicum


    Students will participate in a minimum of 80 hours in an elementary classroom under the guidance of a licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. (0 plus 0) Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4000 - Classroom Management and Discipline


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
    Focuses on the fundamental skill of classroom management and discipline to minimize wasted teaching time and lessen stress for teachers. Students will learn how to build and sustain effective classroom management routines and discipline plans so as to build classroom structure, promote a sense of community and establish effective teaching environments. Instructional practices focus on helping students to become independent and successful through interactive learning opportunities. Students will engage in a field experience facilitated by university supervisors. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4030 - Integrated Methods of Physical Education, Music, & Art


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; Admission to the Teacher Education. A limited criminal history background check is required before students can enter P-12 schools for observation, practicum, or teacher candidacy work.  These forms must be on file in the Director of Teacher Preparation’s office before students will be allowed to participate in any field experience. 
    Designed to teach future educators how to develop an integrated elementary arts program. This course provides opportunity for integration of the arts into elementary classroom curriculum along with creative ways to provide for purposeful movement that encourages students to invest in skills and habits for life-long benefits. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4448 - Secondary Education Senior Experience


    Students will participate in a minimum of 120 hours in a secondary education classroom under the licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4449 - Elementary Senior Experience


    Students will participate in a minimum of 120 hours in an elementary classroom under the guidance of a licensed educator. Candidates will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4600 - Diagnostic and Corrective Reading


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; EDU 2010 ; ENG 1270  
    Focuses on acquiring skills in diagnostic and corrective procedures for the teaching of reading. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4850 - Student Teaching Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): EDU 1100 ; Admission to the Teacher Education program. Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application.
    Student Teaching Seminar is taken during the student teaching semester and includes work on final assessments and the Teacher Work Sample. Credit(s): 1 (1 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4900 - Student Teaching (Early)


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application
    All-day early elementary classroom experience in an urban elementary school for 7 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a mentor master teacher and university instructor. Summative assessments will be completed during the placement and completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required. Credit(s): 6 (6 plus 0)
  
  • EDU 4910 - Student Teaching (Secondary)


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam. Approved Student Teaching Application.
    All-day secondary classroom experience in a junior or senior high school for 14 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a mentor master teacher and university instructor. Summative assessment will be completed during the placement and completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required. Credit(s): 12
  
  • EDU 4950 - Student Teaching (Upper)


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application
    All-day upper elementary classroom experience in an elementary school for 7 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a mentor master teacher and university instructor. Summative assessments will be completed during the placement and completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required. Credit(s): 6 (6 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 1000 - Foundations of Special Education


    An examination of the historical, philosophical, ethical, and both state and national legal foundations of the field of special education. Students will also examine contemporary research literature and study major contributors to our modern understanding of special education and identify contemporary issues and trends in the field. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 1449 - Mild Intervention Freshman Experience I


    Students will participate in a minimum of 10 hours in a special education classroom observing a licensed special educator. Students will have application or reflection assignments to complete as part of the experience. Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 1949 - Mild Intervention Freshman Experience II


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 1449  
    Students will participate in a minimum of 10 hours in a special education classroom observing a licensed educator. Students will have application or reflection assignments to complete as part of the experience. Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 2000 - Characteristics of Mild Exceptional Needs


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 1000  
    An examination of the characteristics and needs of students with disabilities as well as factors affecting the learning and development of students with mild exceptional needs. Students will examine typical and atypical development through the cognitive, physical, sensory, linguistic, and socio-emotional domains. This knowledge will be applied to the identification of the types, characteristics and etiologies of mild disabilities.  Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 2449 - Mild Intervention Sophomore Experience I


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 1949 
    Students will participate in a minimum of 20 hours in a special education classroom observing and assisting a licensed educator. Students will have application or reflection assignments to complete as part of the experience.  Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 2500 - Communication and Social Skill Development


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 1000  
    The examination and application of strategies to foster student communication and social skills development through goal-setting and professional, community and familial support and interaction. Students will become familiar with various supports including augmentative and alternative communication systems and other forms of communication technologies appropriate for the special education environment. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 2949 - Mild Intervention Sophomore Experience II


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2449 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
    Students will participate in a minimum of 20 hours in a special education classroom observing and assisting a licensed educator. Students will have application or reflection assignments to complete as part of the experience.  Credit(s): 0 (0 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 3000 - Assessment and Planning for Special Educators


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2000 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
    An examination of formal and informal assessments and procedures in special education. Students will learn to select, adapt, modify, administer and interpret assessments used with students with exceptional needs. Students will also learn how to apply assessment data to the development, implementation, monitoring and amendment of individualized education programs. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 3130 - Secondary Content Methods


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 1000 .
    Secondary Content Methods for Special Education will prepare future teachers to understand and adapt to the rapid pace of intergrating teaching and learning while focusing on secondary English language arts, math, science and social studies instruction for students with mild exceptional needs in grades 6-12. A study of effective, research-based instructional practices for students in grades 6-12 with mild exceptional needs. Cadidates will learn and practice methods that promote student success within the general curriculum.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • SPED 3449 - Beginning Practicum: Mild Intervention


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2949 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
    Students will participate in a minimum of 40 hours in a special education classroom under the guidance a licensed special educator. Candidate will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. Credit(s): 1 (1 plus 0)
  
  • SPED 3500 - Learning Environments for Students with Special Needs


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2000 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
    A study of the variety of learning environments for students with exceptional needs. Candidates will demonstrate the ability to plan, manage, and modify learning environments for students with exceptional needs. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 3800 - Strategies for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2000 ;  SPED 2500 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
    A comprehensive examination of the principles for positive emotional and behavioral interventions and supports and their applications to support the learning and development of students with special needs. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 3949 - Advanced Practicum: Mild Intervention


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 3449 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
    Students will participate in a minimum of 80 hours in a special education classroom under the guidance a licensed special educator. Candidate will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester.  Credit(s): 2 (0 plus 2)
  
  • SPED 4000 - Methods for Students with Mild Exceptional Needs


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2000 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
    A study of effective, research-based instructional practices for students with mild exceptional needs. Candidates will learn and practice methods that promote student success within the general curriculum. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 4300 - Family and Community Collaboration


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2500 ; SPED 3000 SPED 3500 ;SPED 3800 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
    An examination of the knowledge and skills to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive services and support for individuals with exceptional needs. Students will learn the importance of interdepartmental collaboration and the role of the special educator as a consultant and specialist.  This course will also highlight techniques for working with and supporting family members and strategies for interagency collaboration for case management, therapies, and transition planning. Candidates will develop skills in team-building, leadership, communication, problem-solving and advocacy.  Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 4449 - Senior Practicum: Mild Intervention


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 3949 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
    Students will participate in a minimum of 120 hours in a special education classroom under the guidance a licensed special educator. Candidate will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0) Students will participate in a minimum of 120 hours in a special education classroom under the guidance a licensed special educator. Candidate will participate in the instructional process for a minimum of 4 lessons across the semester. 
  
  • SPED 4500 - Transition Planning


    Prerequisite(s): SPED 2000 ; SPED 2500 ; Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  
    A comprehensive examination of strategies for teaching independent living skills and promoting successful life transitions.  Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
  • SPED 4850 - Student Teaching Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education program; Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application
    Student Teaching Seminar is taken during the student teaching semester and includes work on final assessments and the Teacher Work Sample. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 1)
  
  • SPED 4900 - Student Teaching: Elementary Mild Intervention


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education program; Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application
    All day elementary classroom experience in an elementary classroom for 7 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a mentor master teacher and university supervisor. Summative assessments will be completed during the placement and completion of a Teacher Work Sample is required. Credit(s): 6 (0 plus 6)
  
  • SPED 4950 - Student Teaching: Secondary Mild Intervention


    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education program; Passing score on state required Pearson Content Exam, Approved Student Teaching Application
    All day elementary classroom experience in an elementary classroom for 7 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a mentor master teacher and university supervisor. Summative assessments will be completed during the placement and completion of a Teacher Work Sample is required. Credit(s): 6 (0 plus 6)

Electrical Engineering

  
  • EE 2050 - Overview of Electricity & Electronics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055 , MA 1090 , MA 1100  or MA 1200 .
    An introductory course in electrical science for non-electrical engineering students and computer science majors. The course extends the student’s knowledge of electrical components and circuits, network analysis methods and simple dynamic circuits in DC Transient and AC steady state. This background is then used in the study of transformers, simple semiconductors, op-amps power supplies, oscillators and optoelectronics. RF theory and antennas are introduced; examples of these applications are reviewed and discussed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 2100 - Circuit Analysis I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210 ; or concurrent registration.
    Resistive linear circuits are studied in depth, including dependent and independent sources. The principal topics of study are: node and mesh techniques, source transformations, Thevenin and Norton theorems, the maximum power transfer theorem and superposition. Inductors and capacitors are introduced as circuit elements, and the time response of first and second-order circuits is developed using ordinary, linear, differential equations. SPICE based circuit simulators, such as NI Multisim, are used for DC and transient circuit analysis. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3100 - Circuit Analysis II


    Prerequisite(s): EE 2100 ; MA 1210  .
    Circuits containing resistors, capacitors, self-inductance, mutual inductance, ideal transformers, independent and dependent sources are studied using phasor-domain methods. The course material includes steady-state solutions, network functions, poles and zeros, resonance, complex power, maximum power transfer, frequency response and simple filters. SPICE based circuit simulators such as NI Multisim, are used for transient and AC steady-state circuit analysis. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3150 - Signals & Systems


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3100 .
    Mathematical descriptions of signals with emphasis on communication systems. Representation of signals in terms of basis functions, Fourier series expansions, Fourier Transforms. Fourier (frequency domain) analysis of linear systems in block diagram form with presentation of such concepts as transmission, distortion, spectral density and ideal versus practical filter. Application of the Fourier concepts in analog communications systems such as AM, FM, followed by an introduction to sampling, analog to digital conversion and digital data transmission. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3200 - Electronics I


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3100  or concurrent registration.
    Introduction to two- and three-terminal semiconductor devices including: junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors and field-effect transistors. DC analysis of transistor circuits to establish quiescent conditions using analytical and graphical methods. Lumped element models of transistors for small-signal amplifier analysis. Small signal and power amplifier design, temperature and tolerance effects. SPICE based circuit simulators, such as NI Multisim, are used to obtain the DC bias, steady-state behavior and frequency response of transistor amplifiers. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3220 - Electronics II


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3200 .
    Low and high frequency response of single stage and feedback amplifiers. Feedback and stability criteria in amplifiers, regenerative transistor oscillator circuits. Ideal and practical operational amplifiers, analysis and design of operational amplifier circuits including: computational, signal conditioning and oscillator applications. SPICE based circuit simulators, such as NI Multisim, are used to simulate transistor and operational amplifier circuits including tolerance and temperature effects on the designed circuits. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3400 - Solid State Electronics


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3200  
    Introduces concepts associated with semiconductor devices. Provides detailed insight into the internal workings of device structures such as pn-junction diode, Schottky diode, BJT, and MOSFET. Information regarding solar cells, LEDs HBTs, and modern field-effect devices is presented. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3500 - EM Fields & Waves


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2200 ; EE 3100  or concurrent registration.
    The study of electromagnetic fields emphasizing forms of Maxwell’s equations of particular interest in engineering applications. The physical sources of electromagnetic fields and vector mathematics are reviewed. A review of static fields precedes the introduction of the concept of quasi-static fields. A brief review of phasor notation from AC circuit analysis is used to introduce time-harmonic electromagnetic fields. Wave solutions are developed for time-harmonic fields. Energy storage, power flow and impedance are emphasized to provide a foundation for use of these concepts in various electrical engineering areas. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3550 - Transmission Lines


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3500 .
    Partial differential equations and complex parameter methods are applied in the study of distributed circuits. Lossless, lossy and high frequency transmission lines are analyzed in the steady state. The Smith-Chart graphical method for line problems is developed and applied to line matching problems. Pulse propagation is examined on a single line and two couple lines. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 3650 - Circuits Laboratory


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3100  or concurrent registration.
    This course introduces students to experimental practices in an electrical circuit laboratory. Students will learn practical aspects of electrical engineering and important practices and habits for the engineer. The laboratory portion of the class will introduce students to (1) common laboratory instruments (including the power supply, multimeter, oscilloscope and signal generator), (2) design and perform laboratory experiments and (3) analyze and interpret the experimental data. Students will also learn to work in teams and with a partner, as well as how to communicate the results by writing laboratory reports. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
  • EE 3750 - Electronics Laboratory


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3200 ; EE 3650 .
    The design and experimental evaluation of electronic waveshaping, amplificationmand switching circuits. Emphasis is placed on the characterization and application of two and three-terminal electronic devices in standard electronic sub-systems. Experiments include: junction diodes, zener diodes, voltage regulators and power supplies, bipolar and field-effect transistor characterization, single and multiple-stage amplifiers, operational amplifiers and oscillators. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
  • EE 4100 - Circuit Synthesis


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3100 .
    This course is an intermediate level treatment of passive and active circuit synthesis. Subjects include scaling and response normalization, methods of approximation, filter network functions and realizability, first criteria and PR functions, driving-point synthesis of LC networks, realizability and second synthesis of undetermined and doubly-terminated ladder networks, and the active simulation of passive filters with generalized impedance converters. Experimental work includes the design and implementation of high-order filters, methods of approximation, design of filters using Butterworth, Chebyshev and elliptic transfer functions, implementation of passive and active filters and their time and frequency domain characterizations. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4150 - Digital Signal Processing


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3150 ; EGR 1500 .
    Development of both mathematical and intuitive understanding of digital signal processing. LTI systems, analog Fourier transforms, discrete Fourier transforms and z-transforms are reviewed. Fourier and z-transforms are extended to 2-d. Signal flow graphs help develop an intuitive understanding of digital signal processing. Both IIR and FIR digital filters are studied. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4200 - Power Circuits


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3200  .
    The application of solid state electronics for control and conversion of electric power. The course concentrates on the analysis and application of semiconductor devices to power and control systems. Areas of study include: power semiconductor-diode rectifiers, thyristors, bi-polar-junction transistors and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. Single and three-phase converters and AC voltage controllers, buck and boost switch-mode regulators, switch-mode AC and DC power supplies and motor speed control. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4300 - Principles of Communication


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3150 .
    The basic principles of the design and analysis of modern communication systems are introduced. Topics covered include brief review of probability theory, performance analysis of modulated communication systems, digital modulation and demodulation, performance of digital modulation schemes, overview of information theory and key aspects of error control coding. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4350 - Communications Laboratory


    Co-requisite(s): EE 4300 .
    This laboratory provides experimental support for the material covered in the senior year communications class. The laboratory includes experiments in the areas of amplitude and frequency modulation, digital signaling, pulse-code modulation and digital carrier systems. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
  • EE 4400 - Electrical Machines


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3500 .
    The application of electromagnetic theory to electric machine design and operation. Magnetic fields, magnetic circuits and magnetic energy storage are reviewed. Three-phase power systems are introduced. The principles and operating characteristics of transformers and rotating electrical machines are emphasized. Energy formulations are used to provide a common approach to the study of a variety of AC and DC machines. Laboratory experiments with rotating electrical machines are performed in the concurrent Machines and Controls Laboratory. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4450 - Machines & Controls Laboratory


    Co-requisite(s): EE 4400 ; EE 4800 .
    This laboratory provides experimental support for the material covered in the senior year controls and machines classes. The laboratory covers the measurement and analysis of performance of electric motors and closed loop controls for a servomotor. In each experiment emphasizing motor characterization, the steady state rotation speed, output torque and electrical-to-mechanical conversion efficiency are measured for a particular type of motor. In each experiment emphasizing servomotor control, a gain in the closed loop (e.g. speed gain of the servoamp-motor-tachogenerator) and a system performance measure (e.g. steady state error) are determined for a particular type of control loop, such as position control or speed control. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
  • EE 4800 - Linear Controls


    Prerequisite(s): EE 3100 .
    The application of signals-system concepts and mathematical techniques to the analysis of linear control systems. Interpretation and manipulation of block diagrams for closed loop control systems are introduced. Derivations, calculations and approximations are used to obtain system performance measures, such as stability and steady state errors. Design of compensators (lead, lag and lead-lag) and PID controllers using root locus and frequency response methods are emphasized. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4973 - EE Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000 ; senior standing.
    The presentation of a design solution to an engineering problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science and electrical engineering theory. Students will aim to produce systems that will be safe, robust, cost-effective, technically sound solutions to the problem. Coursework will include: setting specifications, conceptual system design, subsystem analysis and characterization, consideration of environmental impact, equipment sourcing and the production of technical documentation for the design. Credit(s): 2 (2 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4974 - EE Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): EE 4973 .
    The implementation of the design solution prepared in Senior Project I. The course will involve construction and test of the project hardware and software. The project concludes with a hardware demonstration and an oral presentation to engineering faculty. Credit(s): 2 (2 plus 0)
  
  • EE 4990 - Special Topics in Electrical Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor and the dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Sciences.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of electrical engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable
  
  • EM 2040 - Applied Statics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1055  with a C or better; PH 1100  with a C or better. 
    Open to Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Energy Engineering and Electrical Engineering students only. Study of forces on bodies at rest and on moving bodies. Vector algebra, forces in two and three dimensions, free-body diagrams, equilibrium, centroids and center of gravity, friction and moment of inertia, and work/energy methods.  Credit(s): 3 0

Emergency Response Management

  
  • ERM 1200 - Introduction to Emergency Management


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100  
    This course provides an overview of historical and current status of the emergency management discipline. Topics include an introduction to areas of emergency management responsibility including risk assessment, mitigation, preparedness, communications, response and recovery. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 2000 - Incident Command Fundamentals


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 1200  
    This course provides an introductory view of the Incident Command System (ICS), with particular focus on the ICS functional areas, interaction within the functional areas and a practical examination of the use of ICS at the local, state and national levels. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 2100 - Disaster Response Operations and Management


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 1200  
    This course provides an overview of basic knowledge and skills necessary to address disaster relief and recovery efforts. Topics include disaster declaration, damage assessment, roles and responsibilities of emergency response agencies, managing relief efforts and disaster response planning. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 2200 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 1200  
    Introduction to Homeland Security presents a framework for understanding the role Emergency Service Personnel play in today’s era of Homeland Security. The class will focus on events that led up to this new Homeland Security era, the relationship between national, state and local agencies and specific strategies, operations and tactics that can be used to prevent and protect against future threats. Special emphasis is placed on understanding 9-11, the entire framework of Homeland Security in the United States and the unique issues faces by Emergency Service Personnel. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 3000 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Emergency Response and Management


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 1200  
    This course examines legal issues related to emergency response and emergency management.  Topics include:  an overview of duty and liability issues regarding training, response, emergency vehicles and emergency medical services; the legal authority government units; and ethical considerations in emergency response and emergency management. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 3100 - Risk Management


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 1200  
    This course covers risk management from the public health, environmental risk and emergency management perspectives. Students will explore vulnerability and risk assessment methodologies for natural disasters and man-made events.  Students will also study risk response and control strategies as well as risk assurance and reporting. This course explains how risk management is an important component of emergency preparedness and overall emergency response management. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 3200 - Financial Systems for Emergency Management


    Prerequisite(s): BA 1200 ERM 1200 MA 1025  
    This course includes an introduction to private and public financial systems, relevant basic financial concepts, budgeting in private and public sectors, an examination of financial tools and their application to significant events and managing grant applications in public and private sectors. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 4000 - Emergency Planning


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 3200  
    This course provides an overview of the proactive and reactive aspects of emergency planning and on the need for partnerships among federal, state and local governmental agencies as well as among public and community sectors. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ERM 4900 - Emergency Management Capstone


    Prerequisite(s): ERM 2100 ERM 3100 ERM 4000  
    In this course students will build upon what they have learned throughout their course work in emergency response management, integrating the theory, knowledge and practitioner insights they have gained through their studies. Students will demonstrate their skills and knowledge by analyzing a series of historical and recent case studies and evaluate the policy options that officials are facing today, in addition to future approaches in ERM. These cases will focus on the basic framework and resources needed for effective disaster and emergency response management. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Energy Engineering

  
  • ENE 2100 - Introduction to Energy Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or administrative approval.
    This course introduces the student to the field of energy engineering.  Various topics covered include both non-renewable (conventional) forms of energy production and use (coal, oil, hydro, and nuclear) as well as renewable forms of energy (wind, solar, biofuels, geothermal). Credit(s): 1
  
  • ENE 3010 - Energy Engineering Project I


    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, completion of the following courses: IME 2010 EGR 1710 EGR 2000 ENE 2100 ME 2050 EE 2050  or administrative approval.
    This sequence of courses covers topics involved with all forms of renewable energy and compares and contrast them to conventional energy sources. Various concepts such as natural capitalism, climate science and sustainability are introduced and researched. A major focus of this sequence is group interaction/cooperation and presentation. Open ended design projects in the renewable energy field are encouraged and directed by a faculty member with possible industrial representative/adjunct faculty interaction.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • ENE 3020 - Energy Engineering Project II


    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, IME 2010  , EGR 1710  , EGR 2000  , ENE 2100  , ME 2050  , EE 2050  or administrative approval.
    This sequence of courses covers topics involved with all forms of renewable energy and compares and contrast them to conventional energy sources. Various concepts such as natural capitalism, climate science and sustainability are introduced and researched. A major focus of this sequence is group interaction/cooperation and presentation. Open ended design projects in the renewable energy field are encouraged and directed by a faculty member with possible industrial representative/adjunct faculty interaction.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • ENE 3140 - Wind & Solar Power for the Electrical Grid


    Prerequisite(s): ME 2050 ; EE 2050 .
    An introduction to the operation of the electrical power grid with the dominant generator types in operation. Identification of energy storage and power electronics apparatus required to connect other types of power sources to the grid. Case studies of existing wind and solar power installations feeding the grid, with an explanation of the operational advantages and concerns of each. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ENE 3150 - Energy Storage in Fuel Cells & Batteries


    Prerequisite(s): CH 1000 ; EE 2050 .
    An introduction to electrochemistry of various primary and secondary electrochemical cells and the chemistry of various fuel cell types. Identification of electrical behavior, environmental impact and total life cost of each. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ENE 3160 - HVAC & Geothermal Systems


    Prerequisite(s): ME 2050 .
    An introduction to a) heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, b) heat pumps and c) geothermal systems. Theory of operation and high-efficiency equipment designs are discussed. Course includes lecture and lab applications. Credit(s): 3 (2 plus 3)
  
  • ENE 3200 - Ethanol & Biofuels Production


    Prerequisite(s): CH 1000 ; IME 2010 .
    An introduction to the chemistry and production of ethanol and biofuels. An overview of the biochemistry for ethanol and several biofuels is presented. Ethanol and biodiesel production is emphasized. The design, equipment, operation and process flows for ethanol and biodiesel plants are examined. Engineering, safety, maintenance, economic and environmental issues are discussed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • ENE 4950 - Energy Engineering Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or administrative approval.
    This course combines industry experience and knowledge gained in the classroom. The student will serve as an engineering team member of an organization. The student will participate in a pre-internship seminar and will complete required internship tasks.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • ENE 4973 - Senior Thesis I


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing; ACC 2140 ; EGR 2000 ; EE 2050 ; ME 2050 .
    Capstone courses integrating engineering, economic, societal and environmental issues. In ENE 4973 , a suitable subject is proposed and the issues to be examined are identified. This effort results in a detailed proposal. In ENE 4974 , information is gathered and calculations performed to complete the examination of the subject. This effort results in final thesis. While some parts of a thesis might be supported by laboratory work or Energy Engineering Project work, the intent is that a thesis should focus on the national/global energy implications of a particular technical choice. Cross-program project/thesis activities are encouraged. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ENE 4974 - Senior Thesis II


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing; ENE 4973 .
    Capstone courses integrating engineering, economic, societal and environmental issues. In ENE 4973 , a suitable subject is proposed and the issues to be examined are identified. This effort results in a detailed proposal. In ENE 4974 , information is gathered and calculations performed to complete the examination of the subject. This effort results in final thesis. While some parts of a thesis might be supported by laboratory work or Energy Engineering Project work, the intent is that a thesis should focus on the national/global energy implications of a particular technical choice. Cross-program project/thesis activities are encouraged. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ENE 4990 - Special Topics in Energy Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of energy engineering. This course could also be an energy engineering-based, group domestic or international trip during summer, winter, or spring break. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable

Engineering

  
  • EGR 1500 - Computer Programming for Engineers


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1010  with a grade of C or better; PH 1100  with a grade of C or better. 
    Engineering problem solving. Fundamentals of C programming. Control structures and data files. Modular programming with functions. Arrays. Advanced topics. Review of some basic numerical problem-solving techniques, such as interpolation, solution of non-linear equations in one variable and solution of systems of linear equations. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 1710 - Engineering Graphics & Design


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1010  or concurrent registration.
    Introduction to the engineering profession and design. Development of the design process and communication skills. Principles of engineering graphics and computer-aided-design. Group projects. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 2000 - Engineering Communications


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270  with a grade of C or better.
    This course develops two significant engineering communication skill sets: effective technical writing and effective oral presentations. Each student will create technical documents (such as work instructions and user manuals) and a technical paper suitable for publication in an engineering journal. Throughout the course, students will make oral presentations concluding with software-based capstone presentations of their technical papers. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 2600 - Materials Science


    Prerequisite(s): CH 1000  or CH 1220 ; PH 1100  or PH 1300 .
    The mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal and magnetic properties of engineering materials; structure of matter; crystalline structure and imperfections; environmental effects; selection of materials in design. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 2650 - Manufacturing Processes


    Prerequisite(s): CH 1000  or CH 1220 PH 1100  or PH 1300 .
    An introduction to the many processes used in manufacturing. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 3410 - Statistical Quality Analysis I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030 , MA 1090  or equivalent; sophomore standing.
    Cost of quality, problem solving tools, descriptive statistics, normal distributions and variable control charts. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 3420 - Statistical Quality Analysis II


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030 , MA 1090  or equivalent; sophomore standing.
    Probability theory, discrete distributions, attribute control charts, sampling, statistical tests, regression analysis, analysis of variance, factorial experiments, reliability, TQM, FMEAs and control plans. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 3430 - Applied Probability & Statistics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1100  or MA 1200 .
    Probability theory, distribution functions, acceptance sampling, normal distribution, chi square distribution, statistical tests, analysis of variance, regression analysis. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 3600 - CAD I - Parametric Model


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 1710  with C or higher; MA 1030  or equivalent.
    This course is based on 3D CAD modeling procedures including: layers, curves, entities, design features, surface features and assemblies. Design projects will focus on practical applications. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 4400 - Professional Practice


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030  or MA 1090 ; ENG 1250  
    A study of the concepts and methods required to make design and planning decisions, including capital investment decision making, time-value of money, equivalence, multiple alternatives, replacement criteria and cost of capital depreciation. Professional engineering ethics and interaction with government, industry and related agencies. Computer applications. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EGR 4820 - Computer Integrated Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): Junior/senior standing.
    Integrates multi-disciplinary technologies through analysis, design and use of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM). Provides an understanding of automation technology including computer numerical control (CNC), robotics and programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Introduction to manufacturing management systems, manpower and materials. Scheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 2 (1 plus 3)

Engineering Mechanics

  
  • EM 2010 - Statics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210  or concurrent registration; PH 1300 .
    Forces and moments of a force; resultants; couples; equivalent force systems; two-and-three-dimensional equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; centroids; concentrated and distributed loading; trusses; friction; moments of inertia. Computer applications. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EM 2020 - Dynamics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210 ; EM 2010  with grade C or better.
    This course is intended to give students an understanding of both the theory and applications of engineering mechanics. The topics include: kinematics of particles; kinetics of particles; Newton’s laws of motion, energy, momentum; systems of particles; kinematics of rigid bodies; plane motion of rigid bodies; forces and accelerations; energy; momentum. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EM 3100 - Mechanics of Materials


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210 ; EM 2010  with grade C or better.
    Stress and strain concepts on various planes of a loaded member, principal stresses and Mohr’s circle, thin-walled pressure vessels; shear, moments and torsion and resulting stresses; deflections in beams and buckling of columns. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
  • EM 3150 - Mechanics of Materials Laboratory


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3100  or concurrent registration.
    Experimental studies of the mechanical properties of materials and structural elements. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
  • EM 3500 - Fluid Mechanics


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2020  or concurrent registration; MA 2100  or MA 2300 .
    Fluid statics and dynamics. Laminar and turbulent flows. Use of the equations of motion in the study of fluid flows. Dimensional analysis. Design of pipe networks. Introduction to Boundary Layer Theory. Compressible flow. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8