Dec 07, 2021  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3 plus 1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Human Services

  
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    HS 4000 - Case Management


    Prerequisite(s): HS 1200, HS 1500.
    This course will provide theoretical knowledge, in tandem with hands on practice, of techniques in case management related to human service clients and agencies. Case management with a wide range of populations will be discussed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3
  
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    HS 4500 - Advanced Aging


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Students will take a look at how their role as a human service professional links directly to the well-being of copious senior citizens. This course will review the most relevant challenges we face as an aging society. At no other time in the world’s history have we experienced the sheer numbers of older adults living today and the expectations that a large majority of Americans will live longer than we have previously experienced. Students will focus on how social scientists build knowledge and understanding through theory development and testing, and introduce the evolution of theoretical thought from a social science perspective. The major issues affecting an aging society are addressed, including how theoretical perspectives predict how society may change as larger numbers of people are classified in older age groups. The life course perspective, and the implications of early life events in affecting later life decisions are addressed, as are cultural differences in intergenerational exchanges. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HS 4950 - Human Services Internship


    Prerequisite(s): HS1200, HS1500, HS2000.
    An internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills  learned in the classroom in a work setting. The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks and exchanges. Credit(s): 3

Humanities

  
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    HUM 2100 - Study Abroad


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course provides students with the opportunity to travel abroad and study the history and culture of another country. The course involves both classroom and experiential education and includes ethnographic studies. Can be repeated for additional credits. (3 credits) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Compare and contrast the culture of another country with American culture, demonstrating an awareness of cultural difference.
    2. Explain through travel writing an understanding of the complex and fascinating roles of religion, art, literature, and history in human development.
    3. Summarize some characteristics and ways of the destination’s cultures and traditions.
    4. Recognize the characteristics of the destination’s artists, architects, writers, and important contributors to cultural movements.
    5. Analyze the social conventions and problems of the city.

  
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    HUM 2510 - Music Appreciation


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course is designed to develop a wider knowledge and enjoyment of music, especially the Western Classical tradition, to encourage appreciation of composers and performers, to enhance intelligent listening to recorded music, and to compare the classical heritage with alternative styles.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Identify selected composers and performers, historic periods, and artistic movements in the western musical tradition.
    2. Compare and contrast the different musical periods within the western musical tradition: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern.
    3. Recognize the basic elements of musical sounds and techniques pertaining to expression.
    4. Appraise the formalist vs. expressionist positions concerning the meaning or lack of meaning of musical ideas.
    5. Interpret the connection between music and one other performing art such as narrative ballet.

     

  
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    HUM 2520 - Art Appreciation


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    Designed to provide a broader knowledge and deeper understanding of the visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, and painting, to relate this experience to the contemporary world, and to enhance awareness of both man-made and natural environments within which we live. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the terms and concepts basic to the study of art appreciation.
    2. Identify and explain the various elements that comprise a piece of art, such as color, line, movement and texture.
    3. Describe how art has developed over time, recognizing the canons and conventions from those different time periods.
    4. Analyze a particular work of art to illustrate the time period in which it was created.
    5. Recognize the distinctions and variations among genres within the fine arts.

  
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    HUM 2730 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course introduces the major philosophic orientations, emphasizing intellectual systems from Classical Greece through the 20th century. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the terms and concepts basic to the study of philosophy.
    2. Classify and describe the sub-disciplines of philosophy.
    3. Recognize deductive and inductive arguments.
    4. Examine a philosophical passage or brief text in terms of vocabulary and the argument it gives.
    5. Evaluate the Socratic dictum: “The unexamined life is not worth living.”
    6. Construct a brief philosophical argument.

  
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    HUM 2800 - Creative Writing


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course includes an intense study of fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry genres. While learning to annotate and interpret work from both American and international authors, students will work to develop their personal writing craft. Students will experience the entire writing process from brainstorming, drafting, editing, and revising, to giving live readings of their original work. Other requirements involve in-class writing workshops, generative exercises, and discussions. This course qualifies as a Humanities Literature Elective. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HUM 2990 - Special Topics in Humanities


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of humanities. This course may be repeated for additional credit. (variable credits) This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HUM 3100 - Topics in Philosophy: The Good Life


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This higher-level philosophy course explores both ancient and modern theories of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Hedonism, all philosophies that offer ontological and ethical considerations of the good life. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students are challenged to examine the question, “What is the proper or most fulfilling way to live life?” Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Compare and contrast the ancient doctrines of Stoicism, Hedonism, and Epicureanism along with their modern and postmodern counterparts.
    2. Recognize the basic methods employed by an oligarchy to control or govern its citizens.
    3. Compare and contrast philosophies which promote a ‘return to nature’ with philosophies which insist that useful and flourishing lives are found only embedded within society.
    4. Examine the connections among politics, power, Eros, and the good life.

    Construct a sustained philosophical argument.

  
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    HUM 3110 - Introduction to Cinema


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course will study film as a mass media. Fundamental elements of film and examination of the social, cultural, political and aesthetical values communicated by film will be explored. Students will engage in critique and analysis of both narrative and documentary film. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Differentiate between “movies” as mass entertainment or consumer products, and “films,” which may offer unique insights into society, culture, and the human condition.
    2. Summarize many contentious debates surrounding the medium of film, debates such as the introduction of sound and color into film and the value and purpose of special effects.
    3. State the building blocks of film with special concentration upon the shot and cut, and montage.
    4. Analyze films using the tools of film analysis, including auteur theory and scopophilia (gaze theory), hermeneutics, and semiology.
    5. Recognize film as a powerful medium of illusion, with the ability to mold beliefs, desires, fears, and in some ways our personal and cultural identities.

     

  
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    HUM 3140 - Children’s Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This is an introduction to child and adolescent literature. Classics, contemporary, international, multicultural and modern pieces of literature will be studied. Students will emerge capable of teaching literature using best practices and meeting a variety of diverse student needs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HUM 3180 - Dramatic Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 
    This course is an introduction to dramatic literature, focusing on the interpretation of dramatic texts. Students will also study the history of drama and the major dramatic forms, as well as read plays representative of key movements and time periods, beginning with the Greek tradition and culminating in contemporary American drama. Students will also experiment with the performative aspects of dramatic literature. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the history of drama and the major dramatic forms.
    2. Analyze and interpret dramatic literature, and articulate these interpretations both orally and in writing.
    3. Synthesize the many elements of drama, including the use of language, dramatic structure, setting, symbols, and characterization.
    4. Construct a theatrical performance, with careful attention to staging, direction, and acting, such that these elements unite to convey a cohesive interpretation of a play.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of dramatic literature and theatrical performances.

  
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    HUM 3200 - Philosophy of Technology


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This course introduces students to the concept of technology as a philosophical discipline, and explores the role of technology in human culture.  The differences between Epistémé and Techné are studied in detail.  Various philosophers will be explored. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this, course students will be able to:

    1. Differentiate the scientific method from others ways of understanding the natural world.
    2. Define and evaluate the ‘idea of nature’.
    3. Distinguish between techne and episteme.
    4. Compare and contrast three models of knowing: Classical, Positivist, and Feminist.
    5. Compare and contrast the three philosophical attitudes towards technology: ancient skepticism, enlightened optimism, and romantic uneasiness.
    6. Investigate and appraise a single philosopher of technology: Heidegger, Haraway, Foucault, Arendt, or Mumford.

  
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    HUM 3220 - Philosophy of Law


    Prerequisite(s): HUM 2730 .
    This course introduces students to the two traditions concerning the justification for laws. First, legal positivism, which assumes no intrinsic connection between law and morality. Second, natural law theory, which insists upon such an intrinsic connection.  After students have become familiar with these traditions and their major exponents, we will examine three reasons laws are enacted: the harm principle, the offense principle, and the parental principle.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Construct a sustained explanation concerning the meaning of law.
    2. Distinguish between civil laws and moral codes.
    3. Define and distinguish the two major justifications for law: natural law and Positive Law (Legal Positivism).
    4. Recognize the purposes for enacting laws: to prevent harm of others; legislative bodies acting in parental locus; to prevent groups or sub-groups from experiencing offense; to levy taxes and fines.
    5. Evaluate the differences between legal argumentation and argumentation in other disciplines, such as philosophy.
    6. Evaluate what satisfies as acceptable criteria for evidence in jurisprudence.

  
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    HUM 3310 - Interpretation of Fiction


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course instills an appreciation of great fiction by providing an overview of the techniques and skills used in writing and interpreting literature. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Analyze and recall the components and devices of fiction.
    2. Critique, interpret, and analyze written texts.
    3. Produce an analysis or interpretation of a fictional work using MLA documentation.
    4. Understand the elements of literary genres, such as the novel, the short story, poetry, and drama.
    5. Compare literature from a variety of cultures and perspectives.
    6. Understand and apply literary criticism.

  
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    HUM 3320 - Major British Writers


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course is an introduction to selected poets, novelists, and dramatists in British Literature. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

    1. Describe the evolution of British literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    2. Define and describe British genres and subgenres.
    3. Analyze and discuss the literary devices and themes particular to British literature.
    4. Construct an analysis of British literature using MLA documentation.
    5. Interpret literature from a variety of British cultures and perspectives, including Irish, Canadian, and post-colonial nations.

  
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    HUM 3330 - American Writers


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course is a survey of selected American writers representative of key literary and cultural movements in the United States. (3 credits) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Recall the evolution of American literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    2. Analyze the literary devices and themes particular to American literature.
    3. Generate an analysis or interpretation of an American literary work using MLA documentation.
    4. Recognize American genres and subgenres.
    5. Compare literature from a variety of American co-cultures.

  
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    HUM 3350 - Great Books of the Western World


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This course is a study of outstanding novels including classic canonical texts, as well as non-canonical texts that have recently emerged. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Analyze and interpret works of literature that have earned significant critical recognition.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of what makes a literary work great.
    3. Examine and critique some of the important themes and ideas that Western civilization concerns itself with.
    4. Demonstrate improved reading, writing and analytical skills.

  
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    HUM 3360 - African American Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course is an introduction to the literature of Americans of Black African ancestry. Special attention will be given to major developments in form and themes, major writers, and the evolution of an African American literary tradition. (3 credits) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

    1. Describe the contributions of African American writers, and thereby acknowledge the diversity of American literature and culture.
    2. Discuss the evolution of African American literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    3. Identify and explain the themes that are specific to the African American literary tradition.
    4. Analyze literary form and content, the interrelationship of literature and history, and the application of black literary theory and criticism.
    5. Construct an interpretation of an African American text using MLA documentation.

  
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    HUM 3370 - Horror in Film & Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This course explores the human fascination with horror and the uncanny through close viewing and reading of classic works of literature and film. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Identify the conventions employed in cinematic and literary horror narratives.
    2. Interpret horror conventions in terms of contemporary social issues.
    3. Identify concepts in narrative theory such as unreliable narrators and in film such as diegesis.
    4. Explain themes pertinent to horror narratives such as ‘the uncanny,’ ‘the haunting specter,’ ‘scientific transgression,’ ‘nature’s revolt against humans.’
    5. Distinguish between the tragic and the horrific.

  
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    HUM 3380 - Shakespeare in Stratford


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course will introduce students to classic literature and theater through experiential learning; the course includes excursions to theatrical performances at locations such as the international Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario, and the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre. Can be taken more than once for additional credits. (3 credits) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Interpret the language of Shakespeare and describe his use of literary conventions such as tone, imagery, symbolism, rhyme and meter.
    2. Discuss the philosophical issues theatrical works provoke.
    3. Analyze the ideas regarding power (political and paternal) and one’s duty to an authority that appear in the plays of Shakespeare and others.
    4. Critique the differences between the texts and their theatrical adaptations.

  
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    HUM 3390 - Women in Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This course is designed as a survey and introduction to a variety of female writers, and students will think critically, write, and present about these texts. This course will also seek to answer why women’s writing has often been marginalized and how women writers have begun to gain more prominence. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Recognize a selection of diverse women writers.
    2. Recall and analyze key themes in women’s literature.
    3. Examine and critique questions about women’s literature.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the significance of women in literature.
    5. Analyze, interpret, synthesize, and write about texts written by women.

  
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    HUM 3410 - Family Stories, Family Histories


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1270 or ENG1272.
    This course is an interdisciplinary course introducing students to the literature of family stories and the science of genealogical research. Students will first study a variety of literary works that examine the significance of family narratives and then conduct their own genealogical research about their families. The course will culminate in a project that documents students’ discoveries through the writing and documentation of original family stories. Approved as a Humanities Literature elective. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HUM 3420 - Popular Culture and Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272.
    This course is designed as an in-depth exploration of a literary topic in popular culture. Students will consider the idea of a high culture v. popular culture; further, they will understand the genre of literature and explore debates within this field regarding what constitutes a text worthy of study. Students will read popular culture texts and accompanying academic arguments in order to critique and evaluate these works. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HUM 3500 - Contemporary Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272  
    This course is an introduction to contemporary works of literature. Students will study recent texts and analyze emerging genres and movements. This course also requires students to study the relationship between fiction and the contemporary world. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the conventions and characteristics particular to contemporary literature, including emerging themes, genres, and movements.
    2. Analyze contemporary literature and articulate these interpretations both orally and in writing (according to MLA standards).
    3. Create a researched interpretation of a contemporary work of fiction.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between contemporary literature and the context from which it emerges.
    5. Synthesize common themes among a variety of texts, while also differentiating among these texts by studying both form and content.

  
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    HUM 3710 - Ethics


    Prerequisite(s): ENG1272.
    This course is an introduction to classical ethical theory; how to adopt ethical perspectives; appreciation for ethical problems with applications for contemporary issues such as euthanasia, hunger and welfare, capital punishment, and corporate responsibility. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Distinguish between arguments of public policy and ethics. 
    2. Define selected meta-ethical concepts and use them in debating practical ethical controversies.
    3. Identify the five broad types of meta-ethical theories and describe their basic ideas.
    4. Explain the general position important ethical philosophers have espoused.
    5. Construct brief ethical arguments based upon induction, deduction, and evidence.

  
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    HUM 3720 - Advanced Critical Thinking


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is an introduction to the evaluation of forms of argument; recognition and detection of argumentative fallacies; deductive and inductive thinking; and formal logical structures. (3 credits) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Identify the variety of speech-acts.
    2. Recognize the two major kinds of argumentation (deduction and Induction).
    3. Evaluate inductive arguments based upon the criteria of strong and weak.
    4. Critique deductive arguments in terms of validity or invalidity.
    5. Construct truth tables.
    6. Prove deductively valid arguments using the rules of propositional and predicate logic.

  
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    HUM 3740 - Philosophy of Terrorism


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    The philosophy of terrorism is an advanced course in philosophy which examines the two fundamental questions pertaining to terrorism and its related topics. The first question pertains to notions or concepts: What is terrorism? The second question concerns ethics: Can terrorism ever find moral justification? Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the meaning of terrorism.
    2. Weigh the activity of terrorism (and counterterrorism) from the ethical theories of consequentialism and deontology.
    3. Appraise the question of whether an act of terrorism is ever justified.
    4. Describe ‘Just War Theory’.
    5. Judge the ideas of ‘Supreme Emergency’ and “Moral Disaster.’

    Examine mass-media presentations of terrorism and terrorists using the model of Baudrillard.


Indiana Tech-College Readiness

  
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    IIT 1000 - University Experience


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Through participation in Indiana Tech’s University Experience, students will explore, establish, and develop the academic and personal skills necessary to transition and succeed in college and as a self-directed student. 1 credit. (1 plus 0) Credit(s): 1 (1 plus 0)
  
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    IIT 1050 - College Study Skills


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will use a combination of self-reflection, assessment and group work to foster a strong foundation for success in college course work. Topics such as strength and personality type identification, goal setting, building your campus support network, time management, prioritization of tasks, accountability for goals and responsibilities, basic research skills, and presentation skills are addressed. This course awards college credit but does not apply towards graduation. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IIT 1270 - Introduction to Critical Inquiry


    Prerequisite(s): Co-requisite: ENG1272. Co-requisite(s): ENG 1272 .
    This interdisciplinary seminar offers students an introduction to reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making skills for application in their professional and personal lives. The course includes a study of language and argument. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IIT 1900 - Academic & Career Success Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Through participation in the Academic & Career Success Seminar, students will develop the communication, professional and educational skills necessary to further their educational and career opportunities. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    IIT 2000 - Pre-Internship Seminar


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    IIT 2000 is designed for students preparing for an academic credit or non-academic credit internship experience. An internship provides students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to real world work situations in a professional environment. Subjects covered will be the following: self-assessment of career objectives and internship goals; exploration of resources and techniques for finding and evaluating potential internships; resume and cover letter writing; interview techniques; techniques to maximize learning in an internship; experience recordkeeping; and communication, conflict resolution and problem solving in the organizational setting. Also covered will be professional dress, workplace ethics, and appropriate behavior. IIT 2000 is a prerequisite for the following courses IS 4950, HS 4950, REC 4950, SM 4950, HCA 4950 and BA 4950 and preferred for all non-academic credit internships. 0 credits. Credit(s): 0
  
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    IIT 2990 - SI:Tech LEADS Lab


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Directed study in college readiness. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Variable (0-3) credits Credit(s): 2

Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering

  
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    IME 2010 - Safety Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 or advisor approval.
    Principles of safety engineering applied to industrial situations. Topics include job safety analysis, accident investigation, personal protective equipment, fire and electrical safety, facilities and layout. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 2020 - Work Design


    Prerequisite(s): IME2010.
    Motion study practices relating the worker to equipment and environment. Application of the principles of motion economy, time study, use of flow process diagrams, worker-machine charts, micro-motion analysis, time formulas, work sampling, rating, allowances, standard date systems and predetermined time standards. Techniques and procedures for developing and applying the principles of human factors engineering to systems design. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 2110 - Six Sigma I


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1030 or MA 1090 or equivalent; sophomore standing.
    An introduction to the quality concepts, procedures and documentation needed to establish an effective quality system. Specific tools include Pareto diagrams, cause and effect diagrams, check sheets, histograms, scatter diagrams, run charts, control charts and process capability. Projects and computer applications. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    • Apply general quality improvement techniques.
    • Explain basic statistical measures.
    • Utilize concepts involving control charts for variables and process capability.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in at least one statistical software package.

  
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    IME 3020 - Computer Simulation of Manufacturing Processes I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 3430.
    Computer simulation of manufacturing processes. Systems simulation structure, logic, and methodology. using simulation to identify opportunities for process improvement. Application of random numbers and statistical distributions. Importing CAD graphics and other external files into simulation models. Introduction to manufacturing simulation project management. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 3040 - Computer Integrated Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): MA1100; EGR1710. Co-requisite(s): EGR 3600 .
    A study of the design and use of computer-based integrated manufacturing management systems for the allocation and control of plant, equipment, manpower, and materials. 4 credits. (3 plus 1) Credit(s): 4 (3 plus 1)
  
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    IME 3060 - Advanced Computer Integrated Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): EGR2650; IME3040.
    This course provides a vehicle for students to apply in an open-ended situation the lessons learned in previous courses such as Computer Integrated Manufacturing. The course is frequently referred to as “Automation”, and focuses on automation of flexible manufacturing cells. The objective is to offer a final training to upper-level students in implementation of computer-based automation, and by doing so, help them prepare themselves for a contemporary, high-tech, manufacturing workplace. 3 credits. ( 3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 3110 - Six Sigma II


    Prerequisite(s): IME 2110.
    An introduction to the quality concepts, procedures and documentation needed to establish an effective quality system. Specific tools include: control charts for attributes, sampling plans, reliability, cost of quality and an introduction to TQM. Projects and computer applications. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    • Understand the theory of cost of quality
    • Explain the fundamentals of probability
    • Utilize control charts for attributes
    • Apply concepts regarding acceptance sampling, sampling plans, and reliability.
    • Understand general aspects of TQM.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in at least one statistical software.

  
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    IME 3120 - Six Sigma III


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 3430.
    A study of how to design experiments and use statistical analysis to determine the sensitivity of the output of a process to changing input parameters. Included are randomized designs, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA) with single factor experiments, randomized Block Design, Latin Square designs, incomplete and complete Block Designs, 2k Factorial Designs, replication, Nested Designs, split-plot design, regression analysis, response surface methods, covariance, and the Taguchi Method. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    • Ability to select controllable factors and to recognize uncontrollable factors which affect the yield of a process.
    • Application of hypothesis testing.
    • Development of test statistics.
    • Ability to analyze ANOVA routines for the various types of experimental designs.
    • Ability to design and analyze the appropriate experiment for a variety of applications.
    • Application of the software MINITAB.

  
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    IME 4020 - Lean Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): IME 2020, EGR 2650.
    The study of the principles and practices used to identify and minimize non-value-added activities present in the manufacturing environment. Concepts covered include pull systems, cellular flow, quick change-over, quality at the source, point-of-use storage, 5-S, standardized work, visual control systems, and value of stream mapping. Emphasis is placed on moving from a focus of local optimums to optimizing the entire system. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 4110 - Six Sigma IV


    Prerequisite(s): IME 3110.
    The examination of various quality control and assurance concepts and their integration into a comprehensive quality management system. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    • ​Learn, absorb and practice elements of quality philosophy prescribed by Deming, Juran, Crosby, Feigenbaum and Ishikawa.
    • Learn and apply the core principles of Total Quality to classroom as well as business and personal life.
    • Document case study solutions to reinforce the learning of Total Quality Culture characteristics.
    • Benchmark local and regional business enterprise(s) against Total Quality principles and concepts.

  
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    IME 4300 - Integrated Resource Management


    Prerequisite(s): IME 4020, EGR 3430.
    Manufacturing planning from supply through distribution. Concepts include: Supply Chain Management, Economic Order Quantity, Just-in -Time (JIT), MRP,MRP II,ERP, and Distribution Requirements Planning (DRP). Course will include exposure to related software and e-commerce best practices. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 4950 - IME Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Faculty Advisor.
    Directed study of IME-related student work experience. Not repeatable unless approved by the Dean. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IME 4973 - IME Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000; senior standing.
    The presentation of a creative engineering design solution to a real-world physical problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science, and engineering theory. Students will aim to produce systems that will be safe, robust, cost-effective, and are technically sound solutions to the problem. Students must demonstrate knowledge of the information that currently exists in the public domain relative to their project proposal. Students are required to sit for a comprehensive exam over the IME engineering coursework. 2 credit hours. Credit(s): 2
  
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    IME 4974 - IME Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): IME 4973.
    The presentation of a creative engineering design solution to a real-world physical problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science, and engineering theory. Students will aim to produce systems that will be safe, robust, cost-effective, and are technically sound solutions to the problem. Students must demonstrate knowledge of the information that currently exists in the public domain relative to their project proposal. 2 credits. Credit(s): 2
  
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    IME 4975 - IME Senior Project


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000; senior standing. CPS students only.
    The presentation of a creative engineering design solution to a real-world problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science, and engineering theory. Students will aim to produce systems that will be safe, robust, cost-effective, and are technically sound solutions to the problem. One semester course. 4 credits. Credit(s): 4
  
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    IME 4990 - Special Topics in Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the dean of engineering.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of industrial and manufacturing engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable

Information Systems

  
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    IS 1100 - Introduction to Information Systems


    An introduction to information systems with an emphasis on business related computing. Common computer applications are used to support theory. Scheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 1150 - Principles of Information Systems


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An overview of the field of information systems and the technology used to support and run organizations today. This course looks at why information systems are crucial to businesses and what advantages they provide. Students investigate the components of computers and systems, data and information, the Internet, information security, electronic commerce, enterprise systems, systems development, ethics and computer crime. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 1200 - Digital Imaging


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An introduction to the technical aspects of digital imaging using Adobe Photoshop. You will learn basic saving methods, selection and retouching tools, be introduced to scanning procedures, layers, masks, and various other aspects of the software. Optimization and image preparation for Web applications will also be covered. The essential skills and concepts gained from this course are relevant to the use of digital imaging in the modern environment and the many commercial applications for which digital imaging is used. 3 credits (3 plus 0) For Digital Graphics majors only. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0) For Digital Graphics majors only.
  
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    IS 1300 - Programming I


    Prerequisite(s): CS 1200 or CS 1250 with grade C or better; MA 1035 or MA1030.
    An introduction to computer programming using the Java language, beginning with the fundamental steps needed to create, compile and run simple stand-alone applications that are platform-independent. Students will learn how to use primitive data types, control statements, methods, and arrays in their software. In addition to covering essential techniques, this course prepares students for an advanced object-oriented Java programming course. Scheduled and unscheduled projects. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Scheduled and unscheduled projects. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 1400 - Visual Communication


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1200 .
    This course provides an introduction to concepts in visual design and communication. Topics include graphic elements, style, grids, typography, color, organization, proportion and scale. This course also will present common errors made in visual design and practical techniques for correcting these errors. Students will demonstrate the ability to improve the visual quality and effectiveness of user interfaces and multimedia productions by presenting and evaluating existing and original work to the class. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 1600 - Concept to Creation


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Designed to prepare students for advanced courses that require basic pre-visualization skills in the graphic design field. The student will use traditional drawing methods to communicate concepts for digital design and storyboarding animations. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 1800 - Interactive Design


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1100 or IS 1150 or co-requisite CS 1250. Co-requisite(s): CS 1250 .
    The course will show students how to incorporate graphics, sound and video into Web pages. Topics include: standard and motion graphics, video and audio. The focus of this course is on producing attractive and interactive pages using the capabilities of the Web browser. Weekly scheduled and unscheduled laboratory. 3 credits (3 plus 0) Weekly scheduled and unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2100 - Web Development I


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1300 with grade C or better.
    A first course in web development introducing hypertext markup languages, style sheets and client side scripting. Students will create webpages rich in multimedia and controlled content. The CSS box model, web browser testing and code validation are also covered. Weekly scheduled laboratory and unscheduled laboratory. 3 credits (3 plus 0) Weekly scheduled laboratory and unscheduled laboratory. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2300 - Programming II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1300 or CS 1300 with a grade C or better.
    A comprehensive second programming course using the Java language. Students will build on their previous basic Java programming knowledge to create class-centric, object-oriented applications that uses abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism to provide great flexibility, modularity, and reusability in developing software. Graphics programming topics, including event driven programming, creating graphical user interfaces, and writing applets are covered. Several advanced features such as using exception handling to make programs robust, using multi-threading to make programs more responsive and interactive, incorporating sound and image to make programs user-friendly, using input and output to manage and process a large quantity of data, and creating client/server applications may also be covered. Scheduled and unscheduled laboratory projects. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Scheduled and unscheduled laboratory projects. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2400 - Design Fundamentals


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1400 
    Students in this course will have an aptitude for the visual arts and/or an understanding of the fundamentals of competent design. The course will review and pursue to a greater depth the structural elements, organizational principles, psychological effects and communicative functions of two-dimensional art and design. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2450 - 3D Modeling


    Prerequisite(s): IS 1400 or administrative approval.
    This course is a comprehensive look at the complete suite of Maya’s polygonal and subdivision surface modeling tools. Students will develop techniques and strategies for efficiently creating virtual models to be used in animations or print. Scheduled and unscheduled labs. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Scheduled and unscheduled labs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2460 - 3D Animation and Rendering


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2450 .
    Students use advanced animation techniques to create character animation and 3D environments including rigging, key framing animation, lighting, camera angles, texturing, and motion. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2600 - Web Site Design


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2100 .
    This course looks at the design aspects of developing an interactive Web site. Topics include user population targets, usability issues including federal standards, physical design characteristics, marketing and maintenance, testing and evaluation and site navigation. Students will develop and test prototype Web sites using hand-coded and an automated framework. Scheduled and unscheduled labs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2900 - Web Development II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2100; CS 2500.
    Continuation of IS 2100. This second course in web development incorporates server-side scripting and relational databases into webpages previously designed in IS 2100. Students will create applications that generate dynamic web pages and store user data. The MVC pattern, data objects, exception handling and input validation are also covered. Weekly scheduled laboratory and unscheduled laboratory. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Unscheduled lab. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 2950 - Graphics Portfolio I


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is a practicum in which students will demonstrate their digital design skills by project work agreed upon by the student and the instructor and monitored throughout the semester at scheduled times. The project or projects will represent an array of performance and become part of the student’s portfolio. 3 credits Credit(s): 3
  
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    IS 2990 - Special Topics in Information Systems


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of information systems. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable
  
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    IS 3100 - Cybersecurity I


    Prerequisite(s): IS1300; IS2100 or NET1200.
    A first course in cybersecurity introducing cybersecurity concepts, terminology, and issues. Topics include security attitudes, data security and risk analysis, network vulnerabilities, malware and cyber attacks, hacking, social engineering, encryption, security policies and access control, cyber terrorism, and cybercrime laws. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 3200 - Cybersecurity II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 3100; NET 1500.
    A continuation of IS 3100. This second course in cybersecurity includes methods and techniques used to conduct a digital forensics investigation with emphasis on the systematic accumulation of electronic evidence, court-validated forensics tools and laboratory hardware, legal methods of processing crime and incident scenes, and reporting results of the investigations. Laboratory experiments. 3 credits. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 3300 - Programming III


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2300 with a grade C or better.
    Continuation of IS 2300. This third course in programming uses advanced level object-oriented programming languages, application framework and development tools to create applications for mobile devices, like the Apple iPhone or iPad. Students will study the mobile design requirements, program several applications in the appropriate SDK, test their product on both simulators and real devices. Examination of appropriate application distribution methods will also be studied. Scheduled and unscheduled labs. 3 credits (3 plus 0) Scheduled and unscheduled labs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 3400 - Typography and Layout


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2950 .
    Activities in this course including projects that will promote the critical awareness of type as basic to successful graphic design skills. Topics include how to choose and specify type, type as a visual element, type applications and type design. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4100 - IS Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): IS 2300; CS2500.
    A first course in the design of an information systems project using the system development life cycle (SDLC) approach. Topics include: use cases, process modeling, and user interface design. Upon completion students will be able to analyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques. Writing required. Credit (s): 3 (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4400 - Cybersecurity Project I


    Prerequisite(s): IS 3200.
    A first course in the design of an cybersecurity project to address security problems facing organizations today. Students apply the concepts and knowledge acquired in cybersecurity, internet and computer programming, database systems, digital forensics, criminal justice and networking engineering. Upon completion, students will be able to analyze a cybersecurity problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques. Writing required. Credit (s): 3 (3 plus 0). Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4600 - Disaster Recovery


    Prerequisite(s): IS3100.
    This course examines the strategies and activities for limiting the impact to and recovering of information systems, networks, and data should a disaster occur. Recovery and test plans are developed and analyzed to return mission-critical systems to an optimally secure and functional state. Risk identification and analysis are explored for assets, physical facilities and end-user functions with secure accessibility. Topics include data assurance, information security, project management disciplines, and business continuity planning. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4700 - IS Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 4100.
    A hands-on exploration of an emerging trend or a new technology in Information Systems. Students will apply systems analysis and design techniques to design and build their own information systems solution. Latitude is incorporated into the course so that students can pursue a project not available with previous courses. In-depth project and presentation. Credit (s): 3 (3 plus 0). Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4750 - Cybersecurity Project II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 4400 .
    A hands-on exploration of an emerging cybersecurity criminal activity, system data breaches and/or attach methods.  Students apply analysis and design techniques to design and build their own cybersecurity solution.  Latitude is incorporated into the course so that students can pursue a project not available with previous courses.  In-depth project and presentation.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4800 - Technical Project Management


    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing or administrative approval.
    Concepts and practical applications including tools and techniques for management of technical projects with emphasis on scope, time, communication, and resources. Topics covered include: task estimating and scheduling, project scope, and resource management. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 4920 - Graphics Portfolio II


    Prerequisite(s): IS 3400 .
    This course is a practicum in which students will create a variety of work that demonstrates the students’ competence in digital graphics. Projects must be approved by faculty and will be monitored throughout the semester at scheduled times. These projects will become part of the student’s portfolio. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3) Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    IS 4930 - Web Portfolio I


    Prerequisite(s): IS2900.
    This course is a practicum in which students will demonstrate their web development abilities by creating an advanced web environment. Each student will create a site of their choosing that demonstrates skills and techniques learned in previous coursework. Projects must be approved by faculty and will be monitored throughout the semester at scheduled times. (0 plus 3) Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    IS 4940 - Web Portfolio II


    Prerequisite(s): IS4930.
    A continuation of IS4930. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    IS 4950 - IS Internship


    Prerequisite(s): IS 3100 CS 3800 , or IS 3400 .
    This course combines professional field experience as a member of an organization with classroom topics and principles of information systems. In addition to the work experience, the student will also participate in a seminar program discussing the relationship of previous course work to actual operations in industry. Variable credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    IS 4990 - Special Topics in Information Systems


    Prerequisite(s): Administrative approval.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of information systems. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable
  
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    IS 5300 - Enterprise Networking & Communication


    This course focuses on the importance of the proper processing, storage, and transmission of information in the business environment and examines the significant issues and obstacles involved. The subjects are presented in the context of using established industry best practices. Topics covered include, LAN/WAN technologies, wireless communications, various types of network traffic, network convergence, security. Special consideration is given to emerging technologies such as cloud computing. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 5800 - System Analysis and Design


    Students will use conceptualization and analysis in the design of an information systems project using the system development life cycle (SDLC) approach. Topics included are use cases, process modeling, data modeling, and user interface design. Upon completion students will be able to analyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques. Writing required. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 6000 - Enterprise Information Processes


    Prerequisite(s): IS5300; IS5800.
    This course is a study of ERP for IS managers. It is a process-oriented, organizational view of the management and implementation of Information Systems. Integrated and emerging technology based solutions are used to plan and develop processes. Students will develop process designs and the corresponding metrics to be used for evaluation of the processes in the EIP systems. Topics included: process analysis, risk management analysis, process design and implementation, supply management for information systems and resources, customer relationship management, developing criteria for deliverables and SLAs (Service Level Agreements), and strategic outsourcing decisions. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 6600 - Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course prepares students for a leadership role in Business Continuity Planning (BCP) with a specific emphasis on Information Technology processes and assets. Topics included will be an in-depth study of risk analysis, risk mitigation, and supervision of the development, maintenance, relevant training and implementation of response plans. Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP) will be explored as a subset of BCP that will focus on the actions to be taken before and after a catastrophic event that will ensure the timely restoration of normal productivity. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IS 6700 - Challenges & Implication of Digitization


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course examines the technical, professional and legal challenges associated with the growing digital environment. Information privacy, cybercrime, data proliferation, net neutrality, and information rights are studied along with legal and regulatory implications. Additional topics include data mining ethical issues, information security, intellectual property, malicious software and data globalization. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Intensive English Bridge Program

  
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    IEP 0010 - Elementary Listening and Speaking


    Prerequisite(s): High School Diploma and Placement Test
    This course is designed for students with a beginning/low elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach a high elementary ELP in listening, speaking, and pronunciation. Students will learn to develop aural comprehension of spoken discourse, work on building vocabulary, and apply speaking skills to express basic ideas with close approximation to the sounds of English. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0020 - Elementary Writing and Grammar


    Prerequisite(s): High School Diploma and Placement Test
    This course is designed for students with a beginning/low elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach a high elementary ELP in writing skills and grammar concepts. Students will learn to develop general comprehension of basic English grammar, such as word classes and tenses, and write with complete sentences and short paragraphs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0030 - Elementary Reading and Vocabulary I


    Prerequisite(s): High School Diploma and Placement Tests
    This course is designed for students with a beginning/low elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach a high elementary ELP in reading comprehension and vocabulary usage. Students will learn to read with increased speed and efficiency and expend their understanding of the root, prefix and suffix of English words. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0040 - Elementary College Skills I


    Prerequisite(s): High School Diploma and Placement Test
    This course is designed for students with a beginning/low elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach a high elementary level ELP in participating in a college class setting, note taking and textbook reading skills, as well as understanding of social, cultural, and education system in the US. Field trips to local attractions and/or presentations of guest speakers will be arranged to help students reach out to the American society, so they will obtain a profound understanding of their learning environment. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0100 - Intermediate Listening and Speaking


    Prerequisite(s): IEP 0010 IEP 0020 IEP 0030 IEP 0040 
    This is an integrated communication skills course for students with a high elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an intermediate ELP in listening, speaking, and pronunciation. Students will learn to identify the main ideas and factual information in level-appropriate passages they hear in various situations. They will also learn to speak with more clarity and fluency so that others can understand them better. Pronunciation skills include English sounds (vowels and consonants) and rhythm, intonation patterns, reduction and contraction, etc.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0200 - Intermediate Writing and Grammar


    Prerequisite(s): IEP 0010 IEP 0020 IEP 0030 IEP 0040 
    This course will help students with a high elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an intermediate ELP in writing and grammar.  Students will learn to write about a variety of topics to reach level-appropriate correctness, clarity and detail. Students will apply the principles of paragraph structure and focus on basic essay organization, formatting, and revision. Punctuation, compound sentences, correction of run-ons and fragments will be enhanced for better use of grammar. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0300 - Intermediate Reading and Vocabulary


    Prerequisite(s): IEP 0010 IEP 0020 IEP 0030 IEP 0040 
    This course will help students with a high elementary level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an intermediate ELP in reading and vocabulary. Students will read and analyze texts in various genres, and apply a variety of strategies for learning and retaining new vocabulary. Through development of critical reading skills and expansion of vocabulary volume, students will increase their reading speed and comprehension. Students will also train to think in English while reading, instead of translating English into their native languages. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0400 - Intermediate College Skills


    Prerequisite(s): IEP 0010 IEP 0020 IEP 0030 IEP 0040 
    This course provides extra practice in a variety of language and technology skills. Students will learn to employ college resources to navigate the academic environment, and obtain competence with information technology. Topics range from cultural issues, current events, to a variety of college subject matters, such as sociology, biology, political sciences, etc.  Field trips to local attractions and/or presentations of guest speakers will be arranged to help students reach out to the American society, so they will obtain an understanding of their learning environment. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0500 - Advanced Listening and Speaking


    Prerequisite(s): Placement Test/C and above on IEP 0100 IEP 0200 IEP 0300 IEP 0400 
    This is an integrated communication skills course for students with an intermediate level English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an advanced ELP in listening and speaking. Students will learn to identify and analyze the information in both social and academic situations. They will also learn to explain and support their ideas and opinions and respond to critique. Pronunciation skills addressed in IEP 0100 will be enhanced, along with recognition and use of formal and informal American English. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0600 - Advanced Writing and Grammar


    Prerequisite(s): Placement Test/C and above in IEP 0100 IEP 0200 IEP 0300 IEP 0400 
    This course will help students with an intermediate level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an advanced ELP in writing and grammar.  In addition to writing about a variety of topics to reach nearly-native correctness, clarity and detail, students also train to think in English, instead of translating their native languages into English, and use English to create clear, comprehensible and well-organized writing. Students will practice and apply advanced grammar structures through collecting materials and thinking, as well as writing and revision. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0700 - Advanced Reading and Vocabulary


    Prerequisite(s): Placement Test/C and above in IEP 0100 IEP 0200 IEP 0300 IEP 0400 .
    This course will help students with an intermediate level of English Language Proficiency (ELP) to reach an advanced ELP in reading and vocabulary, in order to be ready for the demands of reading in college courses. Through reading with increased comprehension and reflecting on a variety of genres, and drawing appropriate inferences from what is read, students will develop their higher-level critical thinking skills so they will progress to comprehend more complicated reading materials. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    IEP 0800 - Advanced College Skills


    Prerequisite(s): Placement Test/C and above in IEP 0100 IEP 0200 IEP 0300 IEP 0400 .
    This course provides extra practice in a variety of language and technology skills, only in a more advanced level and with more intensive training. Students will employ college resources to navigate the academic environment, and obtain competence with information technology so they will be ready for the college academic courses. Topics range from cultural issues, current events, to a variety of college subject matters, such as sociology, biology, political sciences, etc.  Field trips to local attractions and/or presentations of guest speakers will be arranged to help students reach out to the American society, so they will obtain a profound understanding of their learning environment. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Management Information Systems

  
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    MIS 1300 - Software Tools


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course exposes students to general purpose application software including word processing, spreadsheet, presentation software, and operating system computer file maintenance. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
 

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