Dec 07, 2022  
2018-2019 Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3 plus 1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Engineering Mechanics

  
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    EM 3550 - Fluid Mechanics Lab


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3500  or concurrent registration.
    Experimental studies of fluids at rest and in motion. Pressurized and open channel flow. Credit(s): 1 (0 plus 3)
  
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    EM 3700 - Mechanical Vibrations


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2100  or MA 2300 ; EM 2020 EM 3100 .  
    Undamped and damped, free and forced vibrations, design applications, equivalent damping, transient vibrations, systems with more than one degree of freedom, natural frequencies, principle modes, methods of finding natural frequencies, vibration isolation design. Computer applications. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    EM 4500 - Finite Element Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): EM 3100 .
    Overview of finite element methodology. Linear 1-D and 2-D elements. Description of finite element software, modeling requirements and techniques and analysis using general-purpose software. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

English

  
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    ENG 1000 - Introduction to College Reading


    This course is designed to increase accuracy and speed of comprehension in all types of college-level reading, including textbooks, scholarly articles and literary works. In addition, this course emphasizes the elements of standard written English, including grammar, punctuation and sentence and paragraph building. The course culminates in an essay of at least 500 words. College credit awarded, but will not be applied toward degree requirements Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 1100 - Introduction to College Writing


    Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENG 1100  or completion of ENG 1000  with grade C or better.
    This course requires students to engage in sustained reading and writing practices. Students will read a variety of texts and write a number of short essays. This course culminates with a paper of at least 1000 words. College credit awarded, but will not be applied toward degree requirements. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 1250 - English Composition I


    Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENG 1250  or completion of ENG 1000  and ENG 1100  (if required by placement) with grade C or better.
    This course is an introduction to expository writing for a variety of aims and audiences. Students learn to write as a process and are briefly introduced to research and proper documentation. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 1270 - English Composition II


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1250  with grade C or better.
    This course is an introduction to the writing of researched essays for a variety of aims and audiences. Students analyze rhetorical style, structure and argumentation, with an emphasis on building critical thinking skills. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 2320 - Professional Communication


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270  with grade C or better.
    The refinement of verbal and written communication skills for the professional world, with emphasis on applications that develop and synthesize these skills. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 2400 - Grant Writing


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270  with grade C or better.
    Includes information and practice in finding potential sources of grant support, interpreting grant program guidelines, understanding how funding agencies operate charitable giving programs and properly arranging the components of a typical grant proposal. How to research corporations, private foundations and other funding organizations. Students are required to develop an actual grant proposal. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ENG 2990 - Special Topics in English


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of English. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable

Exercise Science

  
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    ES 1000 - Introduction to Physical and Health Sciences


    This is an entry level course in the field of exercise science. This course emphasizes preparation and paths for a diversity of careers in the field of exercise. Students will be introduced to selected topics in the field of exercise science and other related health science disciplines, including: physiology, exercise epidemiology, exercise nutrition, biomechanics, motor control and motor learning. This course is designed to introduce you to the field and prepare you for future classes in the exercise science discipline. 3 credit hours. Credit(s): 3 0
  
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    ES 2000 - Issues in Personal and Public Health


    This course introduces issues in current personal and community health through the examination of causes and solutions to modern health problems. Students will examine the role of health professionals, health programming, theories and policy related to these issues. 3 credit hours. Credit(s): 3 0
  
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    ES 2999 - Field Experience


    Students will participate in 80 hours of practical work in an approved placement. The purpose of this field experience is to guide the student in building connections between theory and practice. 2 credit hours. Credit(s): 2 (2 plus 0)
  
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    ES 3000 - Fitness Evaluation


    An introduction to the basic physiological and methodological aspects of fitness assessment. 3 credit hours. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ES 3500 - Fitness Prescription


    An introduction to the aspects of exercise design and prescription based on a client’s fitness assessment. The course will also include discussions on the importance of client motivation for exercise and wellness. 3 credit hours. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ES 4000 - Excercise for Special Population


    A study of practical information on exercise for persons with a wide range of special diseases and disabilities. An overview of each unique physiology, effects of the condition on the exercise response, effects of exercise training on the condition, and recommendations for exercise testing and programming is presented in a selected topics format. Students will examine clinical exercise testing and prescription relative to disease of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and immunologic systems. 3 credit hours. (3 plus 0) Credit(s): 3
  
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    ES 4100 - Basic Interpretation of ECG


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2710 BIO 2720 .
    The theory and skills that are required to perform, process, and explain electrocardiography and holter monitoring will be explained. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0) Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Understand the basic physiology of ECG.

    2. Recognize the key features on a twelve lead ECG.

    3. Calculate a heart rate from an ECG strip.

  
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    ES 4499 - Internship 1


    Prerequisite(s): A minimum GPA of 2.50 and completion of all major courses with a C or better.
    A 120 hour professional experience in an approved setting. The specific work setting and type of responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Students will participate in activities design to relate theory with practice. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    ES 4500 - Administration of Exercise Programming


    Co-requisite(s): ES 4499  
    An examination of the standards, policies and practices in the organization, implementation and administration of exercise programs for individuals, groups, centers and corporate settings. Topics covered will include facility management, networking, and legal and ethical issues. Students will carry out case studies through their internship experience. 3 credit hours.

      Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

  
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    ES 4999 - Internship 2


    Prerequisite(s): A minimum GPA of 2.50 and completion of all major courses with a C or better.
    A 120 hour professional experience in an approved setting. The specific work setting and type of responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Students will participate in activities designed to relate theory with practice. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Fashion Marketing and Management

  
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    FMM 1200 - Fashion Innovation and Marketing


    An overview of the global fashion industry. An introduction to fashion history, principles and theories; and fashion marketing practices at all levels of the supply chain. This course reviews careers in fashion marketing and management. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 2000 - Textiles and Apparel Evaluation


    This course incorporates an industry approach to studying the relationship between textiles and ready-to-wear apparel and the business of fashion. It includes an evaluation of textile fibers, yarns, fabrication methods, textile finishes, quality standards, production procedures and social responsibility. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 2010 - Visual Merchandising and Promotions


    Study and application of principles and practices in merchandise and promotions for commercial purposes. Emphasis is placed on display fixtures, equipment and techniques through supervised experiences. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 2020 - Software Applications & CAD for Merchandisers


    An introductory course in the fundamentals of software programs useful to fashion marketers and managers. Adobe Creative Suite 6 (Photoshop and Illustrator) will be applied to fashion media and product development.   Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 2025 - Fashion Event Planning


    Investigates the process of planning and managing a fashion event, from the initial customer contact through the final evaluation. Students plan and assess a special event and identify appropriate promotional activities to ensure success. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 3000 - Fashion Accessories


    An in-depth study of the accessories industry from sourcing and manufacturing to consumer end use. Includes product assessment of furs, leather, jewelry, millinery, shoes, handbags, legwear, neckwear, eyewear and other fashion accessories. Field trips, engaging assignments and accessory displays are included. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 3005 - Profitable Merchandising


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 1010 .
    Essential concepts, practices, procedures, calculations and interpretation of figures related to the many factors that produce profit. Includes analysis of data to predict future performance. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 3010 - Chicago Study Tour


    Tours to various businesses which may include retail stores, manufacturing facilities, distribution centers, museums, company headquarters and other sites related to fashion marketing and management. Requires participation in the Chicago Fashion Group International Career Day. Credit(s): 1
  
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    FMM 3020 - Fashion Marketing and Management Internship


    Prerequisite(s): 2.5 GPA; IIT 2000 ; 12 credits of FMM courses including FMM 3005 .
    Completion of 360 hours of directed, practical experience in an approved business in the fashion industry. Credit(s): 4
  
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    FMM 4000 - New York Study Tour


    Examine the NYC fashion industry through visits to the fashion district, showrooms, museum exhibits and flagship retailers. Credit(s): 1
  
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    FMM 4010 - Product Development


    Prerequisite(s): FMM 1200 ; FMM 2000 .
    Study of the product development process for fashion goods. It includes company strategic planning, design and inspiration, communication, materials selection, merchandising and finalizing the product line. Students engage in a group product development activity. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    FMM 4020 - Trend Forecasting


    Prerequisite(s): FMM 1200 ; FMM 2000 ; FMM 3005 .
    Capstone class that examines the forecasting and futuring process for fashion goods including anticipating trends, identifying consumer preferences and creating a competitive advantage. Exploration of computer-integrated forecasting methods to search, capture and analyze trends. Emphasis on professional presentation of forecasting information. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Finance

  
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    FIN 3600 - Corporate Finance


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2140 .
    Financial statement analysis, the concepts of leverage, working-capital practices, cash management, management of marketable securities, inventory financing, stock and bond valuation, cost-of-capital concept and mergers and acquisitions. International risks, foreign-exchange market, stock dividends and stock splits. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Foreign Languages

  
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    SPA 1100 - Conversational Spanish I


    Fundamentals of pronunciation, conversation, grammar and composition. Cannot be taken for credit by native Spanish speakers or students with three or more secondary class units of Spanish. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    SPA 1200 - Conversational Spanish II


    Prerequisite(s): SPA 1100 .
    Continuation of Spanish I. Fundamentals of pronunciation, conversation, grammar and composition of Spanish. SPA 1200 cannot be taken for credit by native Spanish speakers. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    SPA 1300 - Spanish for Business


    Prerequisite(s): SPA 1100 .
    Introduction to the Spanish business world and commercial language. Development of business vocabulary and business conversation skills. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Health Care Administration

  
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    HCA 1100 - Introduction to Health Care Administration


    Study of the U.S. health care system, its history, organization and functions. Study of the interaction of providers, administrators and consumers interact in the system. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 2100 - Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration


    Prerequisite(s): HCA 1100 .
    Basic knowledge of law as it applies to the health care field. Provides a working knowledge of health law enabling students to deal with common legal, ethical and practical problems facing the industry. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 2990 - Special Topics in Health Care Administration


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the dean of the College of Business.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of health care administration. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable
  
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    HCA 3100 - Finance of Health Care Organizations


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 1010 ; HCA 1100 .
    Factors and economics of health care organizations. Information concerning insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, government regulations, reimbursement systems, accessibility, budgeting and human resources. National health insurance and state/local initiatives will be discussed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 3200 - Health Care Policy


    Prerequisite(s): HCA 1100 ; HCA 2100 .
    Comprehensive overview of major health policy issues. Through examination of governmental and political involvement in the organizations and financing of health care services, the course emphasizes factors influencing policy formation. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 4100 - Managed Care & Medical Group Practice


    Prerequisite(s): HCA 1100 .
    Focus on managed health care strategies and their relationship to medical group practice management in the constantly changing environment of health care services. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 4200 - Long-term Care Administration


    Prerequisite(s): HCA 1100 .
    Study of long-term care centers. Analysis of the various settings such as nursing homes, assisted living, retirement communities, home health care, and adult day care. Issues of finance, access, legality, ethics, human resources and current topics are addressed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HCA 4950 - Health Care Administration Internship


    Experiential learning through placement with health care facilities or related organizations. Students are assigned duties and activities involving application of theory, knowledge and skills acquired in related coursework. May enroll more than once and for variable credit. Credit(s): Variable

Health Care Management

  
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    HCM 5000 - Introduction to Health Care Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5000 .
    Focuses on the health care system of the United States. The student will explore the characteristics that make this system unique and complex. Students will be introduced to the evolution, financing, and administration of a variety of health care organizations. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HCM 5300 - Health Care Law


    Prerequisite(s): HCM 5000 .
    Students will gain an understanding of the basic laws that govern health care and how they affect the delivery of health care services. Topics will include reimbursement law, malpractice, liability, HIPPA, patient/provider relationships, quality-of-life decision making, and licensure. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HCM 6200 - Health Care Operations & Quality


    Prerequisite(s): HCM 5000 .
    Students will be introduced to the quality concepts that help improve operational processes that are part of the health care delivery system. Students will analyze different types of health care organizations to develop recommendations for improvement. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HCM 6300 - Health Care Policy & Ethics


    Prerequisite(s): HCM 5000 .
    Students will examine public policy making in the health care sector. Students will learn the guiding principles of policy formulation and analysis and apply them to a range of health care issues. In addition, the course will focus on the major ethical issues facing health care providers, payers, and patients. Credit(s): 3
  
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    HCM 6400 - Health Care Finance


    Prerequisite(s): HCM 5000 .
    Provides an overview of the techniques used in the financial management of health care organizations. Topics will include sources of health care funding, third party payment or reimbursement, the implications of uninsured patients, budgeting, and capital asset evaluation. Credit(s): 3

Health Information Management

  
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    HIM 3000 - Healthcare Accounting and Reimbursement


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1200 ; HIT 1400 HIT 2000 ; HIT 2300 , all with a C or higher.
    This course builds upon previous coding and reimbursement topics to prepare graduate in the management of coding, auditing, and revenue cycle. Topics such as benchmarking, documentation requirements, and strategies for success both in quality of coding/auditing services from multiple viewpoints such as acute care, outpatient services, physician offices and third party settings are addressed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 3200 - Health Informatics Standards


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1400 HIT 2100 
    Vocabulary, terminology and classification systems are vital to the access, combination, manipulation and sharing of encoded data for multiple objectives internally and externally. The purpose and functions, differences and similarities of health care code sets and classifications used for administrative and statistical reporting, ICD, CPT, HCPCS, NDC, CDT and other systems are discussed and defined. Data set standards and data interchange standards are examined. The concentration is to uphold health care standards in classification systems, data governance and data management to achieve data integrity, validity and interoperability. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 3400 - Clinical Data Governance


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 2100  
    This course provides an overview of the interrelationships within the US health care delivery system, the operations of health information systems and EHR concepts. The evaluation of health information systems and data storage design is practiced. Elements necessary for the success of Meaningful Use and HIE for health information sharing is examined. Work design and training, network development and IRB processes are covered. Understanding of the tools and approaches is presented that correlate to managing, leading and strategic thinking for the future of the organization, profession and health care delivery systems. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 3600 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Health Information Management


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 2200  
    This course analyzes and reviews the U.S. Judicial System, case studies on legal procedures to obtain health information, hospital, medical staff and other professional liability. It reviews health information as evidence, consent for treatment, privacy and confidentiality, retention and release of medical information and the health record as a legal document. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 3700 - Principles of Health Care Management


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2320  or HIT 1600  with a C or better.
    The student will gain understanding of the four functions of management- planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The activities of the manager - planning, organizing, decision making, staffing, motivating, control mechanisms, and budgeting - are detailed with examples from a variety of health care settings in an environment of adaptation and survival. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 3800 - Health Care Statistics and Analytics


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 2100 MA 2025  
    This comprehensive and practical treatment of health care statistics and analytics prepares HIM professionals for their evolving role in data analytics. Examples are based on real-life HIM scenarios. Learners are challenged to exercise critical thinking skills to excise data and report on data sets and apply tests to assure quality of data and results. The types of health care data and the tools of data analysis are covered. Statistical techniques and their mechanics and interpretation are discussed for categorical variables, continuous variables and the relationships between two or more variables. The sample selection process and benchmarking are covered with HIM data examples. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4000 - Analysis and Decision Support


    Prerequisite(s): HIM 3200 HIT 2100  
    This course focuses on the exploration of the health informatics data and how it is transformed into meaningful, actionable information.  Through this course students will explore data informatics concepts including, but not limited to, Health Information Exchange, Rules and Regulation of healthcare data privacy in Research, Shift in Health Care to the Patient-Centered approach, Database Search approaches, and Maintaining Healthcare Database integrity. Such areas will enable the student to have the knowledge and analytical mind-set needed to recommend policy and procedures for healthcare data governance and management.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4100 - Data Analysis with Excel


    Prerequisite(s): MIS 1300  with a C or higher
    This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in health data analytics using Microsoft(r) Excel(r). Hands-on exposure to converting data into information using Excel functions and structures to aggregate, summarize, and graphically display information. Attention is given to improving data integrity by minimizing duplication and applying data validation. An introduction to streamiling and automating repetitive tasks is also included. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4200 - Strategic, Organizational, & Financial Management


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1200 HIM 3200  and HIM 3700 .
    Health care leaders must organize systems, lead and influence people. At the same time, leaders must vision the big picture and adapt to change. Skills in personal leadership style, effective communication, strategic thinking and building alliances are explored. Techniques for team success, negotiation, facilitation, networking, consensus building and benchmarking are discussed. Principles of management, power, politics, health policy making, regulation and conflict are examined. Practical applications of health care accounting and finance, including budgeting, forecasting, ratio and variance analysis and procurement are detailed with current examples. Health care initiatives of EHR incentives, Meaningful Use and ICD-10 implementation are considered from a financial perspective. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4400 - Health Care Compliance


    Prerequisite(s): HIM 3000 HIT 2100  
    This course equips learners with the knowledge and skills to understand how a formal compliance program is implemented at a health care facility. Numerous significant examples illustrate real-world compliance cases for study. The role of the compliance officer in managing staff and keeping compliant with federal, state, local statutes and regulations is detailed. The components of an effective compliance program are explored in-depth, including due diligence, creation of policies and procedures, education and training. Legal and ethical consideration, required documentation and reporting, management of internal and external audits, monitoring and enforcement of programs are discussed. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4600 - Health Care Process Improvement


    Prerequisite(s): HIM 3000 HIM 3700  and HIM 3800 
    Operations management, organizational behavior and health services research is explored in this course, with special attention on Total Quality Management (TQM) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). The starting point for quality improvement is understanding the types and causes of system variation. Measurement, variation and CQI tools and techniques are described and practiced, guided by multiple case studies in a variety of health care organizations. Careful examination is given to maximizing the performance of quality improvement teams, measuring customer satisfaction, managing risk, forging a safety culture, educating health professionals and the role of accreditation in promoting quality and safety. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4800 - RHIA Proficiency


    Prerequisite(s): Approval of Program Director. Since this is a review course, it is advised that all coursework other than HIM 4950  be completed prior to HIM 4800.
    Students will review HIM competencies, skills, and knowledge in preparation for the RHIA credentialing exam. Confidently prepare for the RHIA exam with review lectures, study groups and simulated practice exams based on the RHIA competency statements. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIM 4950 - Professional Practice Experience


    Prerequisite(s): Approval of Program Director.
    The Professional Practice Experience encompasses the internship or affiliation students undertake at Health Information-related sites to experience real-world application of their professional preparation. Study materials for the RHIA certification exam are presented. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Health Information Technology

  
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    HIT 1100 - Medical Terminology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1110  with a grade C or better.
    Prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the field of medicine. Topics include medical vocabulary and terms related to anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and medical treatments.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 1200 - Introduction to Health Information Management


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1250  C or better, MIS 1300  C or better
    An introduction to computer system technologies and networks applied to the delivery of health care. This includes the selection, implementation, interoperability, use and value provided by systems used to support health care business, clinical care delivery, healthcare administration, public health, health and health care delivery outcome tracking and reporting. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 1350 - Ambulatory Services Coding


    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: HIT 1100  and BIO 1210  with a C or better.
    Introduces Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and the Health Care Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS) Level II.  Outpatient procedural coding including evaluation and management coding is the concentration.  Coding compliance and adherence to official guidelines is stressed.  Understanding the importance of chargemaster and claims denial management is expanded. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    HIT 1400 - Advanced Coding


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1350 .
    Case studies using more complex code assignments with ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, CPT-4 and HCPCS Level II coding systems are emphasized. Application of Prospective Payment System (including DRGs and APCs) and payment. Coding scenarios cover inpatient, ambulatory, physician practice, and non acute-care settings, as well as present on admission (POA). Students will have hands-on experience with computerized encoding systems. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 1450 - Diagnosis Coding


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1100  with a grade C or better; BIO 1210  with a grade C or better.
    Basic Coding principles for the assignment and sequencing of diagnosis codes. The rules, conventions, instructions, chapter specific guidelines and code structures will be emphasized. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    HIT 1550 - Inpatient Procedure Coding


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1100  with a grade of C or better; BIO 1210  with a grade C or better.
    Introduces inpatient procedural coding. Practice in the assignment of valid codes is emphasized. Coding compliance and adherence to official guidelines is stressed. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    HIT 1600 - HIT Professional Communications


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270  with a C or better
    This course provides students with the theory and practical experience needed to communicate specifically in professional health information management services settings. Students will apply strategies for improving listening, speaking, writing, presentation skills and working in teams. Intercultural communication will be explored. Resume, cover letters and interviewing skills will be developed. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    HIT 2000 - Health Data Management I


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1200  with a grade of C or better
    An introduction to the use of technology in the capture, delivery and analysis of health data in the delivery of services across the continuum of care. The course focuses on the use of electronic health records, data mining and report generation. Students interact with simulations of key EHR and HIM tasks. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 2100 - Health Data Management II


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 2000  with a grade of C or better.
    A continuation and broadening of knowledge from Health Data Management I to include concepts of application of technology to the capture, delivery and analysis of health data in the delivery of services across the continuum of care. The course will provide the knowledge and skills for the student to be able to engage in applied health informatics activities of data management, statistical data analysis and standardizing data structure. The impact of these activities on electronic health record systems which analyze, transmit  and store health care information will be emphasized. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 2200 - Health Data Privacy & Security


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1200  with a grade of C or better.
    This course provides an introduction to policies and practices governing the legal health record. This includes the implementation of HIPAA regulations, policies involving the release and use of protected health information and the security of health data. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 2300 - Healthcare Reimbursement


    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: HIT 1350  , HIT 1450  , and HIT 1550 , all with a grade C or better.
    Introduction to health care reimbursement systems found in medical offices, physician medical specialties, ambulatory service locations and hospitals. A detailed understanding is gained of third party payers, payment methodologies (managed care, capitation, prospective payment systems, fee schedules, etc.), legal and regulatory issues, reimbursement methods, and common insurance plans. Students apply Imedical coding in health claims processing procedures. Grouper Software is used to assign DRG and APC for reimbursement. Students will have hands-on experience with computerized encoding systems. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)
  
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    HIT 2400 - Health Care Leadership


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 2100 .
    The multiple management functions of health information services is the focus in this study. Students gain knowledge in organizational change, human resources, and strategic thinking. Policy creation, leading and participation in projects, use of financial reports and ratios, and process improvement is practiced. Health information exhange and the nationwide health information network will be examined. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HIT 2600 - Practice Experience & RHIT Proficiency


    Prerequisite(s): HIT 1550 HIT 2100 ; and HIT 2200 , all with a grade of C or better.
    This course includes an on-site professional practice experience and preparation for the RHIT credentialing exam.  The experiential portion provides supervised professional practice projects structured to allow student learning experiences within the health information services department of a hospital or other health care organization (requires 40 hours of experience within the session).  Principles of health information technology will be applied through observation and/or mentorship, and participation in a variety of health information management functions and simulations.  This course may require student travel and to be available to complete hours during normal business hours.   In the RHIT exam preparation portion, students will review HIT competencies, skills, and knowledge for all the HIM domains.  RHIT Exam Early Testing Option approval, registration, scheduling, and taking the exam at a Pearson testing site is executed within this course.  The course provides study tips, exam guidelines, review resources, practice exams, and more to help you prepare for the RHIT exam. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Human Services

  
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    HS 1200 - Introduction to Human Services


    An overview of the program, philosophies, history and economics of human and social service agencies. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HS 1500 - Helping Relationships


    Prerequisite(s): HS 1200 .
    This course provides the student an opportunity to increase effectiveness in helping people. This course examines the helping process in terms of skills, helping stages and issues involved in a helping relationship. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HS 2000 - Human Services Programming


    Prerequisite(s): HS 1200 .
    Principles and techniques for human services programming, including philosophical foundation, needs assessment, objective writing, program planning and evaluating methods. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HS 2600 - Human Services Field Experience


    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000 .
    Actual leadership experience in a human services setting or by participation in an organized human services program. Theory is coordinated with practical experience. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

Humanities

  
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    HUM 2100 - Study Abroad


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course provides students with the opportunity to travel abroad and study the history and culture of another country. The course involves both classroom and experiential education and includes ethnographic studies. Can be repeated for additional credits. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Compare and contrast the culture of another country with American culture, demonstrating an awareness of cultural difference.
    2. Explain through travel writing an understanding of the complex and fascinating roles of religion, art, literature, and history in human development.
    3. Summarize some characteristics and ways of the destination’s cultures and traditions.
    4. Recognize the characteristics of the destination’s artists, architects, writers, and important contributors to cultural movements.
    5. Analyze the social conventions and problems of the city.

  
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    HUM 2510 - Music Appreciation


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is designed to provide a broader knowledge and deeper understanding of the visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, and painting, to relate this experience to the contemporary world, and to enhance awareness of both man-made and natural environments in which we live. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the terms and concepts basic to the study of art appreciation.
    2. Identify and explain the various elements that comprise a piece of art, such as color, line, movement and texture.
    3. Describe how art has developed over time, recognizing the canons and conventions from those different time periods.
    4. Analyze a particular work of art to illustrate the time period in which it was created.
    5. Recognize the distinctions and variations among genres within the fine arts.

  
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    HUM 2520 - Art Appreciation


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is designed to provide a broader knowledge and deeper understanding of the visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, and painting, to relate this experience to the contemporary world, and to enhance awareness of both man-made and natural environments in which we live. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the terms and concepts basic to the study of art appreciation.
    2. Identify and explain the various elements that comprise a piece of art, such as color, line, movement and texture.
    3. Describe how art has developed over time, recognizing the canons and conventions from those different time periods.
    4. Analyze a particular work of art to illustrate the time period in which it was created.
    5. Recognize the distinctions and variations among genres within the fine arts.

  
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    HUM 2730 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course introduces the major philosophic orientations, emphasizing intellectual systems from Classical Greece through the 20th century. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Define the terms and concepts basic to the study of philosophy.
    2. Classify and describe the sub-disciplines of philosophy.
    3. Recognize deductive and inductive arguments.
    4. Examine a philosophical passage or brief text in terms of vocabulary and the argument it gives.
    5. Evaluate the Socratic dictum: “The unexamined life is not worth living.”
    6. Construct a brief philosophical argument.

  
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    HUM 2990 - Special Topics in Humanities


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of humanities. This course may be repeated for additional credit. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): Variable
  
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    HUM 3100 - Topics in Philosophy: The Good Life


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This higher-level philosophy course explores both ancient and modern theories of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Hedonism, all philosophies that offer ontological and ethical considerations of the good life. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students are challenged to examine the question, “What is the proper or most fulfilling way to live life?” Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Compare and contrast the ancient doctrines of Stoicism, Hedonism, and Epicureanism along with their modern and postmodern counterparts.
    2. Recognize the basic methods employed by an oligarchy to control or govern its citizens.
    3. Compare and contrast philosophies which promote a ‘return to nature’ with philosophies which insist that useful and flourishing lives are found only embedded within society.
    4. Examine the connections among politics, power, Eros, and the good life.

    Construct a sustained philosophical argument.

  
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    HUM 3110 - Introduction to Cinema


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course will study film as a mass media.  Fundamental elements of film and examination of the social, cultural, political and aesthetical values communicated by film will be explored.  Students will engage in critique and analysis of both narrative and documentary film. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Differentiate between “movies” as mass entertainment or consumer products, and “films,” which may offer unique insights into society, culture, and the human condition.
    2. Summarize many contentious debates surrounding the medium of film, debates such as the introduction of sound and color into film and the value and purpose of special effects.
    3. State the building blocks of film with special concentration upon the shot and cut, and montage.
    4. Analyze films using the tools of film analysis, including auteur theory and scopophilia (gaze theory), hermeneutics, and semiology.
    5. Recognize film as a powerful medium of illusion, with the ability to mold beliefs, desires, fears, and in some ways our personal and cultural identities.

     

  
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    HUM 3140 - Children’s Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This is an introduction to child and adolescent literature. Classics, contemporary, international, multicultural and modern pieces of literature will be studied. Students will emerge capable of teaching literature using best practices and meeting a variety of diverse student needs. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the English-language tradition in children’s literature, from picture books to young adult chapter books.
    2. Identify multiple themes in children’s literature and articulate these themes in both written and oral presentations.
    3. Analyze children’s literature (both verbal texts and visual images) through formal conventions of literary devices and the visual arts.
    4. Synthesize common themes among a variety of texts, while also differentiating among these texts by studying both form and content.
    5. Formulate and construct an original children’s story by building on knowledge of the literary tradition and an understanding of literary devices.

  
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    HUM 3180 - Dramatic Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 
    This course is an introduction to dramatic literature, focusing on the interpretation of dramatic texts. Students will also study the history of drama and the major dramatic forms, as well as read plays representative of key movements and time periods, beginning with the Greek tradition and culminating in contemporary American drama. Students will also experiment with the performative aspects of dramatic literature. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the history of drama and the major dramatic forms.
    2. Analyze and interpret dramatic literature, and articulate these interpretations both orally and in writing.
    3. Synthesize the many elements of drama, including the use of language, dramatic structure, setting, symbols, and characterization.
    4. Construct a theatrical performance, with careful attention to staging, direction, and acting, such that these elements unite to convey a cohesive interpretation of a play.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of dramatic literature and theatrical performances.

  
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    HUM 3200 - Philosophy of Technology


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course introduces students to the concept of technology as a philosophical discipline, and explores the role of technology in human culture.  The differences between Epistémé and Techné are studied in detail.  Various philosophers will be explored. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this, course students will be able to:

    1. Differentiate the scientific method from others ways of understanding the natural world.
    2. Define and evaluate the ‘idea of nature’.
    3. Distinguish between techne and episteme.
    4. Compare and contrast three models of knowing: Classical, Positivist, and Feminist.
    5. Compare and contrast the three philosophical attitudes towards technology: ancient skepticism, enlightened optimism, and romantic uneasiness.
    6. Investigate and appraise a single philosopher of technology: Heidegger, Haraway, Foucault, Arendt, or Mumford.

  
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    HUM 3220 - Philosophy of Law


    Prerequisite(s): HUM 2730 .
    This course introduces students to the two traditions concerning the justification for laws. First, legal positivism, which assumes no intrinsic connection between law and morality. Second, natural law theory, which insists upon such an intrinsic connection.  After students have become familiar with these traditions and their major exponents, we will examine three reasons laws are enacted: the harm principle, the offense principle, and the parental principle.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Construct a sustained explanation concerning the meaning of law.
    2. Distinguish between civil laws and moral codes.
    3. Define and distinguish the two major justifications for law: natural law and Positive Law (Legal Positivism).
    4. Recognize the purposes for enacting laws: to prevent harm of others; legislative bodies acting in parental locus; to prevent groups or sub-groups from experiencing offense; to levy taxes and fines.
    5. Evaluate the differences between legal argumentation and argumentation in other disciplines, such as philosophy.
    6. Evaluate what satisfies as acceptable criteria for evidence in jurisprudence.

  
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    HUM 3310 - Interpretation of Fiction


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course instills an appreciation of great fiction by providing an overview of the techniques and skills used in writing and interpreting literature.  Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Analyze and recall the components and devices of fiction.
    2. Critique, interpret, and analyze written texts.
    3. Produce an analysis or interpretation of a fictional work using MLA documentation.
    4. Understand the elements of literary genres, such as the novel, the short story, poetry, and drama.
    5. Compare literature from a variety of cultures and perspectives.
    6. Understand and apply literary criticism.

  
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    HUM 3320 - Major British Writers


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is an introduction to selected poets, novelists, and dramatists in British Literature. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

    1. Describe the evolution of British literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    2. Define and describe British genres and subgenres.
    3. Analyze and discuss the literary devices and themes particular to British literature.
    4. Construct an analysis of British literature using MLA documentation.
    5. Interpret literature from a variety of British cultures and perspectives, including Irish, Canadian, and post-colonial nations.

  
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    HUM 3330 - American Writers


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is a survey of selected American writers representative of key literary and cultural movements in the United States. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Recall the evolution of American literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    2. Analyze the literary devices and themes particular to American literature.
    3. Generate an analysis or interpretation of an American literary work using MLA documentation.
    4. Recognize American genres and subgenres.
    5. Compare literature from a variety of American co-cultures.

  
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    HUM 3340 - World Cultures


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    Religious, philosophical and artistic developments in the non-Western world, with an emphasis on Asia. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)
  
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    HUM 3350 - Great Books of the Western World


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is a study of outstanding novels including classic canonical texts, as well as non-canonical texts that have recently emerged. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Analyze and interpret works of literature that have earned significant critical recognition.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of what makes a literary work great.
    3. Examine and critique some of the important themes and ideas that Western civilization concerns itself with.
    4. Demonstrate improved reading, writing and analytical skills.

  
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    HUM 3360 - African-American Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is an introduction to the literature of Americans of Black African ancestry.  Special attention will be given to major developments in form and themes, major writers, and the evolution of an African American literary tradition. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

    1. Describe the contributions of African American writers, and thereby acknowledge the diversity of American literature and culture.
    2. Discuss the evolution of African American literature, noting key historical and literary movements.
    3. Identify and explain the themes that are specific to the African American literary tradition.
    4. Analyze literary form and content, the interrelationship of literature and history, and the application of black literary theory and criticism.
    5. Construct an interpretation of an African American text using MLA documentation.

  
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    HUM 3370 - Horror in Film & Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course explores the human fascination with horror and the uncanny through close viewing and reading of classic works of literature and film. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Identify the conventions employed in cinematic and literary horror narratives.
    2. Interpret horror conventions in terms of contemporary social issues.
    3. Identify concepts in narrative theory such as unreliable narrators and in film such as diegesis.
    4. Explain themes pertinent to horror narratives such as ‘the uncanny,’ ‘the haunting specter,’ ‘scientific transgression,’ ‘nature’s revolt against humans.’
    5. Distinguish between the tragic and the horrific.

  
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    HUM 3380 - Shakespeare


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course will introduce students to classic literature and theater through experiential learning; the course includes excursions to theatrical performances at locations such as the international Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario, and the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre. Can be taken more than once for additional credits. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Interpret the language of Shakespeare and describe his use of literary conventions such as tone, imagery, symbolism, rhyme and meter.
    2. Discuss the philosophical issues theatrical works provoke.
    3. Analyze the ideas regarding power (political and paternal) and one’s duty to an authority that appear in the plays of Shakespeare and others.
    4. Critique the differences between the texts and their theatrical adaptations.

  
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    HUM 3390 - Women in Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270 .
    This course is designed as a survey and introduction to a variety of female writers, and students will think critically, write, and present about these texts. This course will also seek to answer why women’s writing has often been marginalized and how women writers have begun to gain more prominence. Credit(s): 3 (3 plus 0)

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Recognize a selection of diverse women writers.
    2. Recall and analyze key themes in women’s literature.
    3. Examine and critique questions about women’s literature.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the significance of women in literature.
    5. Analyze, interpret, synthesize, and write about texts written by women.

  
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    HUM 3500 - Contemporary Literature


    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1270  
    This course is an introduction to contemporary works of literature. Students will study recent texts and analyze emerging genres and movements. This course also requires students to study the relationship between fiction and the contemporary world. Credit(s): 3 (0 plus 3)

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the conventions and characteristics particular to contemporary literature, including emerging themes, genres, and movements.
    2. Analyze contemporary literature and articulate these interpretations both orally and in writing (according to MLA standards).
    3. Create a researched interpretation of a contemporary work of fiction.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between contemporary literature and the context from which it emerges.
    5. Synthesize common themes among a variety of texts, while also differentiating among these texts by studying both form and content.

 

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