Feb 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3+1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Other Courses

  
  • FMM 1200 - Fashion Innovation and Marketing


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An overview of the global fashion industry. An introduction to fashion history, principles and theories; and fashion marketing practices at all levels of the supply chain. This course reviews careers in fashion marketing and management. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 2000 - Textiles and Apparel Evaluation


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course incorporates an industry approach to studying the relationship between textiles and ready-to-wear apparel and the business of fashion. It includes an evaluation of textile fibers, yarns, fabrication methods, textile finishes, quality standards, production procedures and social responsibility. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 2010 - Visual Merchandising and Promotions


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Study and application of principles and practices in merchandise presentation and promotions for commercial purposes. Emphasis is placed on display fixtures, equipment, and techniques through supervised experiences. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 2020 - Software Applications & CAD for Merchandisers


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An introductory course in the fundamentals of software programs useful to fashion marketers and managers. Adobe Creative Suite 6 (Photoshop and Illustrator) will be applied to fashion media and product development.   Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 2025 - Fashion Event Planning


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Investigates the process of planning and managing a fashion event, from the initial customer contact through the final evaluation. Students plan and assess a special event and identify appropriate promotional activities to ensure success. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 3000 - Fashion Accessories


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An in-depth study of the accessories industry from sourcing and manufacturing to consumer end use. Includes product assessment of furs, leather, jewelry, millinery, shoes, handbags, legwear, neckwear, eyewear and other fashion accessories. Field trips, engaging assignments and accessory displays are included. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 3005 - Profitable Merchandising


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 1010 .
    Essential Concepts, practices, procedures, calculations, and interpretation of figures related to the many factors that produce profit. Includes interpretation of historic data analysis to predict future performance. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 3010 - Chicago Study Tour


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Tours to various businesses which may include retail stores, manufacturing facilities, distribution centers, museums, company headquarters and other sites related to fashion marketing and management. Requires participation in the Chicago Fashion Group International Career Day. Credit(s): 1
  
  • FMM 3020 - Fashion Marketing and Management Internship


    Prerequisite(s): 2.5 GPA; IIT 2000; 12 credits of FMM courses including FMM 3005.
    Completion of 360 hours of directed, practical experience in an approved business in the fashion industry. Credit(s): 4
  
  • FMM 4000 - New York Study Tour


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Examine the NYC fashion industry through visits to the fashion district, showrooms, museum exhibits and flagship retailers. Credit(s): 1
  
  • FMM 4010 - Product Development


    Prerequisite(s): FMM 1200 ; FMM 2000 .
    Study of the product development process for fashion goods. It includes company strategic planning, design and inspiration, communication, materials selection, merchandising, and finalizing the product line. Students engage in a group product development activity. Credit(s): 3
  
  • FMM 4020 - Trend Forecasting


    Prerequisite(s): FMM 1200 ; FMM 2000 ; FMM 3005 .
    Capstone class that examines the forecasting and futuring process for fashion goods including anticipating trends, identifying consumer preferences, and creating a competitive advantage. Exploration of computer-integrated forecasting methods to search, capture, and analyze trends. Emphasis on professional presentation of forecasting information. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PLAW 2300 - Legal Research and Writing


    Prerequisite(s): PLAW 1100; ENG 1272 both with a C or better.
    The purpose of the course is to develop the legal writing and research skills students will need as a paralegal. Students will be exposed to various legal writing techniques that are used in drafting a wide variety of legal documents. Throughout the semester, a strong emphasis is placed on proper writing methodology, formatting, and citation. Projects include drafting research, correspondence, litigation, and transactional documents. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PLAW 2400 - Civil Procedural Law


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is designed to provide students an understanding of the litigation process commencing from the initial fact-gathering stage through post-judgment proceedings. The student will study the procedural rules governing litigation, including: filing requirements, service of process, calculation of deadlines and discovery. Students will learn both practical application and theoretical knowledge. Credit(s): 3
  
  • PLAW 3100 - Tort Law


    Prerequisite(s): PLAW 1100. 
    This course will introduce concepts that comprise the bulk of modern America torts law and practice. Students will examine the legal principles of civil wrongs for which the law recognizes a legal remedy on behalf of a private individual. Study will include defenses against claims of harm. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to determine: what conduct counts as tortuous or wrongful; whether a conduct caused the kind of harm the law will recognize; and those defenses that can be raised against a claim of liability. Credit(s): 3

Accounting

  
  • ACC 1010 - Accounting Principles


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1020  with grade of C or better.
    An introduction to the principles of accounting. The complete accounting cycle is studied for a sole proprietorship. Specifically included are preparation of journal entries, worksheets, financial statements, and a more detailed look at cash, receivables, and fixed assets. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2140 - Managerial Accounting


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 1010  with a C or better.
    Accounting as a decision-making tool with an emphasis on manufacturing enterprises. Decision-making in management is studied along with management reports and financial statement analysis. Specifically included are production costs, breakeven analysis, budgeting, variances, and differential analysis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2200 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 1010  with grade of C or better; MA 1025 .
    Intermediate Accounting I is a detailed study of financial reporting concepts focusing on financial statements and related disclosures. Asset valuation and income measurement are studied extensively, concentrating on revenue, cash, receivables, inventories; property, plant and equipment; depreciation, depletion and intangibles. Additional topics include a review of accounting systems and financial statement reporting requirements. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2240 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2200  with grade C or better.
    Intermediate Accounting II is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. The course is a detailed study of financial reporting concepts focusing on the valuation of liabilities and investments.  The reporting of stockholders’ equity is also studied including such topics as contributed capital, earnings per share calculation, and retained earnings.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2400 - Cost Accounting


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2140  with a grade C or better. 
    A study of cost accounting by the elements of cost: material, labor and factory overhead. Job order cost accounting, process cost accounting and standard cost accounting variances for material, labor and factory overhead are developed in-depth. The use of cost information in inventory decisions is covered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2500 - Individual Income Tax


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2200  with grade of C or better.
    A study of the concepts of individual taxation with extensive practice in filling out individual Form 1040 and back-up forms. A brief overview of Partnership and Corporate taxation is also presented. The concept of tax planning and research is stressed in every area. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 2990 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of the College of Business.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of accounting. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • ACC 3300 - Auditing


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2240  with a grade of C or better.
    A theory course in auditing which considers the necessary procedures in an audit, purposes for which audits are made, internal control standards, generally accepted auditing standard standards, fraud and its detection, independence of the CPA, and presentation of the audit report by the CPA. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 3500 - Corporate Income Tax


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2500  with a C or better.
    A study of the concepts of corporation income taxes. Dividend distribution as controlled by Earnings and Profits is stressed. A detailed study of tax-option (Sub Chapter S Corporations, LLCs and LLPs) is included. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 4700 - Advanced Accounting I


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2240  with grade of C or better.
    A study of selected accounting subjects and theory at the advanced level. Topics include business combinations and consolidations, segment reporting and multinational accounting. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 4740 - Advanced Accounting II


    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2240  with grade of C or better.
    A study of selected accounting subjects and theory at the advanced level. Topics include international accounting standards, legal reorganizations, liquidations and partnerships as well as governmental, not-for profit and fiduciary accounting. Credit(s): 3
  
  • ACC 4990 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of the College of Business.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of accounting. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Biology

  
  • BIO 1000 - Introductory Biology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A course focused on the basic ideas to enable students to appreciate the living world and their relationship to it. Course includes discussion of cellular and organism biology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and interaction among all living organisms. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 1110 - Anatomy and Physiology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Introduction to concepts and processes in human anatomy and physiology. This course will focus on the structure and function of various cells, tissues, and organs, of the human body. Special emphasis will be given to the skeletal, muscular, circulatory and respiratory systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 1210 - Human Disease & Basic Pharmacology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1110  or BIO 2710 /BIO 2720 
    This course covers the basics of general pharmacology and human diseases for Health Information professionals including: signs, symptoms, etiology, and pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases from multiple systems; diagnostic steps and treatments for multiple human diseases; the use and category of pharmacological drugs to treat diseases; processes, actions, and side effects of medications. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 1330 - General Biology I (Organismal)


    Prerequisite(s): Adequate high school preparation in math (trigonometry) and English (composition, critical review, and organizational writing) Co-requisite(s): BIO 1340 .
    The first of a two-course series, BIO 1330 is required of all Molecular Environmental Biology majors Core content areas focus on “big biology”, namely ecology, diversification of life, comparative contributions of all organisms in prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms, macroscopic structure of plant and animal systems coupled to evolution, adaptation, and organismal requirements. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 1340 - General Biology I Lab


    Prerequisite(s): Adequate high school preparation in math (trigonometry) and English (composition, critical review, and organizational writing) Co-requisite(s): BIO 1330 .
    Required alongside GENERAL BIOLOGY I, this experiential learning environment drives students to apply biological learning objectives and demonstrate skills, abilities, and attitudes of scientists. Laboratory investigations focus on the natural world, relying on flora and fauna of the wild and urban settings. Significant writing and problem solving skills develop through laboratory activities. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 1350 - General Biology II (Cell and Molecular)


    Prerequisite(s): Adequate high school preparation in math (trigonometry) and English (composition, critical review, and organizational writing) Co-requisite(s): BIO 1360 .
    The second of a two-course series is required of all Molecular Environmental Biology majors (including those on the pre-med track). Core content areas focus on sub-microscopic elements of all living organisms. Topics include foundational biochemistry, introductory cell biology, cellular energy production, genetics, cell-cell interactions, cell division, and developmental biology. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 1360 - General Biology II Lab


    Prerequisite(s): Adequate high school preparation in math (trigonometry) and English (composition, critical review, and organizational writing) Co-requisite(s): BIO 1350 .
    Supplementing GENERAL BIOLOGY II (Cell and Molecular), this experiential learning environment drives students to apply learning objectives and demonstrate skills, abilities, and attitudes of molecular biologists. Laboratory investigations focus on cellular and molecular analyses, including genetics, genomics, physiology, introductory biochemistry, and biotechnology. Significant writing, problem solving, and computational skills develop through laboratory activities. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 2710 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    Co-requisite(s): BIO 2720 .
    This course develops a comprehensive understanding of the close inter-relationship between anatomy and physiology as seen in the human organism. This course will introduce students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, as well as covering tissues, integument, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. Lab required. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 2720 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab


    Co-requisite(s): BIO 2710 .
    A detailed cadaver-based study of mammalian anatomy and physiology. Systems covered include; skeletal, muscular, nervous, and special senses. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 2730 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2710 /BIO 2720 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 2740 .
    A detailed study of mammalian anatomy and physiology. Systems covered include: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. Lab required. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 2740 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab


    Co-requisite(s): BIO 2730 .
    A detailed cadaver-based study of mammalian anatomy and physiology. Systems covered include: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 2800 - Forensic & Environmental Entomology


    Co-requisite(s): BIO 2810 .
    This course is designed to engage students in practices involving the sampling, preservation, and identification of forensically relevant entomological specimens. Insect collection and successful identification of specimens based on relevance to forensic applications of both criminal and civil nature is expected. Factors influencing insect life cycles, species succession, and relevance as it relates to human decomposition and public health will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 2810 - Forensic & Environmental Entomology Lab


    Co-requisite(s): BIO 2800 .
    This course is designed to engage students in practices involving the sampling, preservation, and identification of forensically relevant entomological specimens. Insect collection and successful identification of specimens based on relevance to forensic applications of both criminal and civil nature is expected. Factors influencing insect life cycles, species succession, and relevance as it relates to human decomposition and public health will be explored. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 2900 - Cell Biology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2730  or BIO 1350 .
    This course covers various topics of cell biology including, molecules of the cell, organelles, membrane transport, cell-cell communication, intracellular trafficking of biological molecules, the cell cycle, intracellular signaling cascades and their receptors, the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, cell motility, cancer, etc. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 2910 - Cell Biology Lab


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1350 BIO 1360 , (NOTE: this major-specific prerequisite is different from the prerequisite for Biomedical Engineering majors) Co-requisite(s): BIO 2900 .
    Expanding techniques and molecular approach to cell biology, students in the College of Arts and Sciences will accomplish hands-on investigations, focused on the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Students will cultivate, sample, experiment, collect data, and make conclusions. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 2990 - Special Topics in Biology


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Arts & Sciences.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of Biology. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • BIO 3000 - Genetics


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 .
    A detailed introduction to the concepts of normal and abnormal molecular genetic processes relating to humans. Topics include: chromosome structure and replication, cell division, genetic engineering, linkage maps, genetic diseases, cancer genetics, and population genetics. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3010 - Genetics Lab


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 BIO 2910 , (NOTE: this major-specific prerequisite is different from the prerequisite for Biomedical Engineering majors). Co-requisite(s): BIO 3000  
    In order to best prepare students majoring in life sciences within the College of Arts and Sciences, GENETICS LABORATORY creates a hands-on environment to expand understanding gained from the concurrent lecture course. Specifically, this wet-laboratory course creates a platform where students develop molecular and genetic techniques, including DNA extraction, restriction digests, bacterial cloning, plant genetics, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA analysis of model organisms. Species diversity dependent on genetic differences take a primary place in the learning objectives. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 3210 - Ecology I (Ecosystems)


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1330 /BIO 1340 BIO 1350 /BIO 1360 Co-requisite(s): BIO 3220 
    As the first in a two-course series, ECOLOGY I provides active learning environments and engagement with the regional community of soil scientists, land use experts, and wetlands developers. Focused on the organism in its physical environment, this course builds upon understanding from GENERAL BIOLOGY I where macro-biology was the concentration, but also requires cellular and molecular foundations from GENERAL BIOLOGY II. Student learning addresses the complexity of intra- and interspecies dynamics among the vast diversity of seventeen ecosystems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3220 - Ecology I Fieldwork


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1330 /BIO 1340 ; BIO 1350 /BIO 1360 Co-requisite(s): BIO 3210 .
    This innovative course takes place in ample and diverse environments within the greater Fort Wayne area. Designed to complement the ecosystem-centric course, ECOLOGY I, this field work course leverages relationships with more than ten governmental agencies or private units to accomplish real-world interfaces. Students work directly with regional experts in weekly investigations; work is outdoor regardless of weather. Getting dirty in the rivers and fields brings relevance and applied learning in areas of land use, wetland restoration, flora maintenance, and species diversity. Students study organisms, collect data sets, scrutinize prior analyses, and propose solutions to environmental challenges while regional experts advise. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 3230 - Ecology II (Molecular)


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3210 /BIO 3220 ; CH 1220 Co-requisite(s): BIO 3240 .
    ECOLOGY II complements the macro-biology approach of ECOLOGY I (BIO 3210), but turns the focus to the molecular practice of ecology. Retaining focus on inter- and intra-species interactions, submicroscopic exploration will deepen comprehension of ecological genetics, bioenergetics, and biogeochemistry. Continued collaboration with the regional community of soil scientists, land use experts, and wetlands developers will bring molecular applications into focus and provide a career network. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3240 - Ecology II Fieldwork


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3210 /BIO 3220 ; CH 1220 Co-requisite(s): BIO 3230 .
    Facilitated by direct interaction with County and City officials, ECOLOGY II FIELD WORK is designed to analyze real-world samples in Indiana Tech laboratories. Molecular, chemical, and microbial analysis of water, soil, and atmosphere will bring deeper understanding of the environment while also building skills for careers in environmental sciences. Active learning in the classroom will extend to the field, particularly with work in horticulture and plant genetics, fermentation and composting, and impacts of system perturbations such as pollution and pesticides. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 3310 - Bioinformatics


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 BIO 2910 BIO 3000 BIO 3010 EGR 3430 .
    Massive data pools drive current scientific investigation in biomedical, forensic, and molecular environmental sciences today. This course provides students with an introduction to the key skills in data collection, management, and manipulation. Project-based learning is directed to more than 20 online databases to provide hands-on experience to prepare students for large-scale, capstone projects. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3600 - Pathophysiology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 .
    This course covers various topics in pathophysiology and examines the biological basis of common clinical disease states. It also looks at how pathophysiological changes in a primary system can impact other body systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3800 - DNA Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 3620 .
    In-depth assessment of the major processes and analytical methods leading to forensic DNA profile development. Content will focus on extraction techniques, quantitation, amplification and electrophoresis of DNA samples leading to evidentiary profile development. Students will also examine complex problems associated with sample contamination, degradation, mixed profile challenges, and statistical analysis of contributor profiles. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3810 - DNA Analysis Lab


    Prerequisite(s): CJ 3620 Co-requisite(s): BIO 3800 .
    In-depth assessment of the major processes and analytical methods leading to forensic DNA profile development. Content will focus on extraction techniques, quantitation, amplification and electrophoresis of DNA samples leading to evidentiary profile development. Students will also examine complex problems associated with sample contamination, degradation, mixed profile challenges, and statistical analysis of contributor profiles. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 3840 - Advanced Microbiology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will focus on the examination of microbiological specimens pertinent to both industrial food and water quality regulations. Furthermore, applications related to epidemiological, bioterror, and forensically relevant considerations as they relate to pathogen dissemination and identification will be addressed. The ultimate goal of this class is to promote student skill development as it pertains to the handling, testing, and identification of major microbiological pathogens from a regulatory and forensically relevant standpoint. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3850 - Advanced Microbiology Lab


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will focus on the examination of microbiological specimens pertinent to both industrial food and water quality regulations. Furthermore, applications related to epidemiological, bioterror, and forensically relevant considerations as they relate to pathogen dissemination and identification will be addressed. The ultimate goal of this class is to promote student skill development as it pertains to the handling, testing, and identification of major microbiological pathogens from a regulatory and forensically relevant standpoint. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 3910 - Molecular Pathogenesis


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 BIO 2910 BIO 3000 BIO 3010 
    This course compares the molecular components that drive propagation of disease-causing agents, focused on bacteria and viruses. Specific attention is given to cell structures, cell surface molecules, biofilms, evasion of the immune response, and virulence factors (including toxins, extracellular versus intracellular survival, and pathogenicity islands). Primary literature forms the “textbook” for this course, providing students with professional skills in reading and interpreting scientific peer reviewed reports. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3920 - Molecular Biology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1350 /BIO 1360 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 3930 .
    This course will explore molecular structures and mechanisms that govern life cycle of eukaryotic cells, prokaryotic cells, and viruses. A particular attention will be paid to structures and functionalities of DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in living organisms. Students will also learn the techniques and technologies of molecular biology commonly used in research including polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, ligation, gel electrophoresis. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 3930 - Molecular Biology Lab


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1350 /BIO 1360 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 3920 .
    This course will explore molecular structures and mechanisms that govern the life cycle of eukaryotic cells, prokaryotic cells, and viruses. Particular attention will be paid to structures and functionalities of DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in living organisms. This course will introduce students to the techniques and technologies of molecular biology commonly used in research including polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, ligation, gel electrophoresis.   Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 4110 - Biochemistry


    Prerequisite(s): CH 2400 ; CH 2410 ; CH 2500 ; CH 2510 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 4120 .
    Taken in the final semester of the Molecular Environmental Biology major, this course reaches heights of content mastery that bring students to a career- or graduate-school ready position. Based on overarching “Threshold Concepts” established by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), this challenging course brings heightened knowledge to connected framework of learning and understanding. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 4120 - Biochemistry Lab


    Prerequisite(s): CH 2400 ; CH 2410 ; CH 2500 ; CH 2510 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 4110 .
    Rather than a set of cookbook-style lab exercises, this course takes the real-world approach to true unknowns and unexpected outcomes. Students will design experiments in order to discover the true answers instead of simply confirming prior facts. This laboratory course uses the entire semester to elaborate the content details of the associated Biochemistry course by interrogating the succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in E. coli (one of the work-horses of molecular biology cloning and protein expression). Students will emerge with career experience and competence. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 4210 - Urban Biomes and Waste


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3210 ; BIO 3230 ; HUM ethics or philosophy course.  Co-requisite(s): BIO 4220 .
    As the penultimate course in preparation for senior projects, URBAN BIOMES AND WASTE brings environmental challenges of the greater Fort Wayne area into the classroom. Local officials and experts will direct semester-long learning topics in current disputes such as pollution control, waste management, public health, land development, or population dynamics. Primary literature will serve as the “textbook” in this course, facilitating student growth in research methods, analysis, and evaluation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 4220 - Urban Biomes and Waste Fieldwork


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3220 ; BIO 3240 . Co-requisite(s): BIO 4210 .
    Identifying relevant problems in Fort Wayne’s urban environments, this field course forces students past barriers to “making a difference” and leads them to service. As they focus on blights to our health and well-being, students will function in the neighborhood by carrying out a major improvement project based on ecological principles. Collaborative problem solving and group service to the greater Fort Wayne community predominates throughout the semester, mimicking team-based science in wider molecular disciplines. These assignments develop effective and respectful communication skills. Uncertain outcomes in scientific research is a hallmark in this course, providing students with the insight to recognize and the courage to handle ambiguity in environmental settings. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BIO 4710 - Immunology


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 .
    A detailed introduction to the concepts of normal and abnormal immune processes relating to humans. Topics covered include: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, immune response to pathogens, B cell development and function, T cell development and function, antibody-antigen reactions, immunodeficiency and auto-immune processes, antibody-mediated and cell-mediated responses. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 4750 - Pharmacogenomics


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3000 
    Pharmacogenomics is the study of how an individual’s genetic variation influences responses to drugs. This course will explore the relatively new trend to therapy tailored to the individual patient rather than “one drug fits all” to maximize efficacy while minimizing adverse reactions, the inter-individual differences in drug responses with emphasis on genetic and genomic factors, as well as ethical, regulatory and economic issues that impact drug therapies. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BIO 4800 - Cell and Molecular Research I


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2900 ; BIO 2910 ; BIO 3000 ; BIO 3010 ; EGR 3430 ; Fourth Year status as Molecular Environmental Biology major.
    In order to merge molecular skill and biomedical knowledge, this two-semester series requires students to carry out basic or applied research in a medical laboratory. Students initiate the project by receiving an appointment to work in a research setting on a novel, short-term, wet-bench research project. The student project is guided by a Mentoring Committee to whom the student submits project plans, interim reports, and final outcomes. A public defense is required in the second semester. This project will motivate students to apply foundational skills and analytical abilities in preparation for advanced study in human or animal medicine. Credit(s): 6
  
  • BIO 4810 - Cell and Molecular Research II


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 4800 ; Fourth Year status as Molecular Environmental Biology major.
    This course is the culmination of the Molecular Environmental Biology major with preparation specific for medical or veterinary school. After the prior semester’s primary research and advice from their Mentoring Committee, each student will complete data analysis, results, and conclusions. The student conveys a written report to the Committee, and a public defense is required this semester. This opportunity will motivate students to work in basic or applied biomedical research settings, to build professional credentials, and to incorporate evidence-based decision-making. Credit(s): 6
  
  • BIO 4900 - Urban Biology Field Project I


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 4210 ; BIO 4220 ; EGR 3430 ; Fourth Year status as Molecular Environmental Biology major.
    In order to merge molecular skills and environmental biology knowledge, this two-semester series requires students to attack a significant challenge in a regional ecosystem. Students will first “pitch” their project to MEB colleagues, and then assemble an Advisory Board to whom project plans, interim reports, and final outcomes will be presented. A public defense is required in the second semester. This project will motivate students to learn the needs of the community as well as the student’s role in understanding and sustaining change. Credit(s): 6
  
  • BIO 4910 - Urban Biology Field Project II


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 4900 ; Fourth Year status as Molecular Environmental Biology major.
    This course is the culmination of the Molecular Environmental Biology major, bringing together practical skill and environmental action. After the prior semester’s accomplishments of convincing the Advisory Board of the Urban Biology Field Project’s rationale, each student will complete Project Objectives, develop a Sustainability Projection, and convey Project Outcomes in both written and oral manners. A public defense is required this semester. The Urban Biology Field Project will motivate students to act on data driven needs of the community as well as to undertake a leadership role in understanding and sustaining change. Credit(s): 6

Biomedical Engineering

  
  • BME 3200 - Thermodynamics & Fluids


    Prerequisite(s): MA 2100 . Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): EM 2020 .
    Energy, entropy, and equilibrium. Introduction to fluid statics and dynamics. Laminar and turbulent flows. The use of equations of motion in the study of fluid flows. Introduction to conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 3250 - Thermodynamics & Fluids Lab


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): BME 3200 .
    Experimental studies of fluids at rest and in motion. Experimental studies in the analysis of heat transfer equipment. Credit(s): 1
  
  • BME 3300 - Biosimulation


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1210 EGR 1500 BIO 2730 .
    Biosimulation course focus on human physiological control theories, models and systems to provide better understanding of the biomedical engineering principles using MATLAB and SIMULINK, computer-aided software mostly used for simulation and control. This course covers mathematical equations to simulate human bio-behavioral systems on drug-deliver, glucose exchange, windkessel model for lung, neuromuscular system and circadian rhythm. Software used in this course provides the hands on experience to design and analyze human physiological models for the various applications in biomedical engineering. Students are graded based on their performance in homework assignment, lab assignment, midterm and final exams. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 3500 - Biomechanics


    Prerequisite(s): EM 2020 .
    Kinematic and dynamic analysis of mechanisms. Computer-aided kinematic design. Experimental studies of mechanical properties of structural elements and prosthetics. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 3700 - Biomedical Instrumentation


    Prerequisite(s): EE 2050 BIO 2730 .
    Biomedical Instrumentation is a sub-disciplinary field of biomedical engineering. This course introduces biomedical engineering principles, design concepts and applications of medical devices used in hospitals. This course includes theoretical lectures and experimental labs to understand medical instrumentation. Bioinstrumentation lab has six experiments on sensors, amplifiers, active filters, data acquisition system and MATLAB software to provide hands on experience to acquire, process and record bio-potential signals. Students are graded based on the performance in homework assignment, lab assignment, midterm & final projects. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 3800 - Medical Device Design Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 3600 .
    First course in problem-based learning series that demonstrates steps necessary to take medical device projects from conception to market from an engineering perspective. Focus on Phase 1: medical device design requirements, including problem identification, patent searchers, literature reviews, FDA requirements, premarket approval applications, investigational device exemptions, and premarket notification. Project management taught in relevant context from developing PM software skills to evaluating “what if” scenarios for possible future outcomes. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 3810 - Medical Device Design Project II


    Prerequisite(s): BME 3800 .
    Second course in problem-based learning series that demonstrates steps necessary to take medical device projects from conception to market from an engineering perspective. Focus on Phase II: medical device design outputs and verification, including design outputs, product description, product design, design risk, material specifications, drafting prints, quality inspection and design verification. Project management is of main focus as well. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 4000 - Advanced Cadaver


    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2740 
    This is a course that provides a hands-on learning experience in proper cadaver prosection of various tissues and organs, tissue sampling and preparation protocols, suturing techniques, surgical instrumentation recognition and function, and surgical techniques demonstrated and verified through cadaver trials. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 4960 - BME Senior Project I


    Prerequisite(s): EGR 2000 ; Senior standing.
    The presentation of a creative engineering design solution to a real-world physical problem. The design solution will involve the formal and creative application of mathematics, science, and biomechanical engineering theory. Students will manage project activities in order to produce systems that will be safe, cost-effective, and are technically sound solutions to the problem. Coursework will include: establishing specifications, conceptual system design, subsystem analysis and characterization, equipment sourcing, and the production of technical documentation for the design. Periodic progress reports to the technical advisor are required. Credit(s): 2
  
  • BME 4961 - BME Senior Project II


    Prerequisite(s): BME 4960 .
    The implementation of the design solution prepared in Biomedical Engineering Senior Project I.  The course will involve construction and test of the project hardware and software.  The project concludes with a hardware demonstration and an oral presentation to faculty and students in the department. Project students will also produce a formal written report. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BME 4990 - Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Sciences or Dean’s designate.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of biomedical engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Business Administration

  
  • BA 2010 - Principles of Management


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ENG 1252 .
    This course introduces students to management theory and practice, with a focus on the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Students explore contemporary issues in management, including stakeholder management, strategic planning, organizational design and culture, ethics, and contemporary models of leadership. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2020 - Operations Management


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 MA 1025 .
    Design of production systems. Topics include product and service design, location planning, capacity planning, design of facilities and work systems and lean manufacturing concepts. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2030 - Principles of Supply Chain Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This introductory course is intended to introduce students to supply chain management including its history, purpose, general principles, career opportunities, and its interrelationships with other functional areas of businesses. It is also intended to introduce standard terms and concepts for communications with supply chain personnel. Understanding the role of supply chain management and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm is an important part of any manager’s training.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2105 - Introduction to Financial Services


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will serve as an introduction to the financial services industry. The organization and structure of banking and financial services as well as the function, purpose and regulation of financial institutions. This course will explore the services offered by financial institutions as well as the major changes and events that are remaking the financial services industry. Concepts such as the time value of money, financial statements, and financial firm performance will also be examined. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2120 - Fundamentals of Risk Management & Insurance Plan


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course explores the fundamental principles of risk management and insurance. Topics include an examination of the role of insurance in pure risks, insurance devices, assessment of risk need in various organizational settings, and managing risk and legal and financial liability. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2140 - Financial Services Marketing


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2500 .
    This course will study the impact of marketing on the financial services industry. An international comprehension of the complexity of the financial services industry and the issues involved in selecting a target market will be analyzed. An international and strategic approach to examining the private sector will be utilized. The course will identify various ways in which a variety of financial services can be classified and retained. An examination of the understanding the role of positioning in communicating the value proposition will also be examined. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2160 - Creating Service & Sales Relationship


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will study the relationship between customer service and sales. Customer service is examined from the initial consumer interaction to the close of the transaction. Identification of techniques to handle customer objections and conflict management will be analyzed with cross-selling opportunities. Service relationships will include identification and resolution of problems, identification of potential opportunities, gaining customer trust, assisting customers in choosing the best solutions, and negotiation and creating agreement. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2170 - Business to Business Sales Management


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 BA 2500 
    This course provides a managerial introduction to the strategic and tactical aspects of business marketing decisions and marketing channel strategy. Students examine the strategic concepts and tools that guide market selection, successful differentiation in business markets, and supply chain management. A mixture of lectures, discussions, cases, videos, and readings are used to examine how product and service decisions are designed to deliver the B2B value proposition, how pricing captures customer value, how value is communicated to and among customers, and how marketing channels are used to make this value accessible to target customers. Students will compare and contrast how the strategic and tactical processes of developing and managing value-generating relationships differ between B2B and B2C markets. Students will also gain understanding of how to manage channel power, conflict, and relationships.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2200 - Personal Finance


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1020 .
    A practical understanding of a personal financial plan and the decisions everyone is faced with throughout their lives. Establishing a financial plan, using credit and long-term loans, lease versus buy decisions for autos and homes, insurance, and investment fundamentals. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2310 - Foundations of Business Communications


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ENG 1252 .
    Foundations of Business Communication is an introduction to business communications and new media. Students will learn and apply the three-step corporate communication process of planning, writing, and completing business messages using appropriate strategy, technical grammar and mechanics. APA formatting is emphasized for this introduction to business communication course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2320 - Social Media Marketing & Communication


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2500 .
    Creating social media marketing plan, strategic planning with social media, digital communities, social publishing, social gaming as a channel for marketing communication, social shopping applications, qualitative and quantitative approaches to social marketing research, social medial metrics. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2350 - Enterprise Systems


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Application of information and communication technologies to logic, problem framing, and solution creation in modern organizations. Emphasis on optimized implementation and management of integrated-technical solutions for organizational decision-making. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2410 - Human Resource Management


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 .
    Principles and policies followed by management in recruitment, development, direction, and control of personnel. Directed study in current legislation, trends and practices in personnel management. The course presents corporations as integrated units whose differences depend upon the people who work in them and the product efficiency of each unit. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2430 - International Management


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 .
    The course is an in-depth study of the cultural, economic, political, sociological, and technological differences that exist between various global regions and countries of the world which have an influence on the growth and success of the multinational company. The course covers the planning, the organizing, the staffing, and the managerial control process of the multinational corporation. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2460 - Exploring Entrepreneurship


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Exploring Entrepreneurship is an introduction to the entrepreneurial studies, suitable for students of any major. The course is d designed to provide a framework for idea creation, opportunity identification, and idea evaluation. Students will explore how a business idea can be developed into a feasible venture through the processes of ideation, planning, innovation, managing, and financing. Students will learn how to recognize and evaluate opportunities, and will conduct research on a business idea and present their findings in a final project. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2500 - Marketing


    Prerequisite or co-requisite(s): ENG 1252 .
    This course provides a general survey of the field of marketing and its scope and significance in business and policy. The role of the target market in designing product, price, promotion, and distribution strategies is evaluated. The use of traditional, digital, and social media marketing practices are included. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2520 - Lean Systems


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course introduces the fundamental Lean systems that underlay modern continuous improvement approaches for industry, government and other organizations. Lean emerged from the Japanese automotive industry, particularly Toyota, and is focused on the creation of value through the relentless elimination of waste. The basic principles have been applied to a wide range of organizations and sectors to improve quality, productivity, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, time-to-market and financial performance.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2530 - Logistics


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1025 MA 2025 ; BA 2010 .
    Provides an analysis of many logistics services to include global logistics, customer service and order management, distribution/fulfillment operations, carrier selection, costing and negotiation. In addition, reviews current logistics technology process support and integration, as well as how emerging technology is changing the future of logistics. Taking a unified approach, students develop a framework for making intelligent decisions within the supply chain. Covers key logistics functions, such as demand planning, procurement, inventory theory and control, transportation planning and execution, reverse logistics, and flexible contracting. Explores concepts such as postponement, portfolio management, and dual sourcing. Emphasizes skills necessary to recognize and manage risk, analyze various tradeoffs, and model logistics systems. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2550 - Personal Selling


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2500 .
    The history and current status of personal selling, the various types of salesmanship and their requirements, sales personality development, product analysis, psychology of selling, and sales strategy. Emphasis will be placed on practical demonstration. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2600 - Occupational Safety & Health


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2010 .
    The analysis, design, and implementation of safety programs in work settings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the economic, legal and social factors of related to providing a safe and healthful working environment for various occupations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • BA 2620 - Construction Documents


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1025 
    This course is an introduction to plans and specifications for commercial construction. Topics include plan reading, components of plan sets and specifications, an overview of basic building materials and representation, and an introduction to the process of quantity takeoff. Credit(s): 3
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9