Feb 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3+1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Master of Business Administration

  
  • MBA 6690 - Special Topics in Human Resources


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5600 .
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of human resources. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • MBA 6700 - E-Business Technology


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5110 .
    This course gives an overview of the technologies relevant to electronic business including strategic planning issues such as operating systems, networking, enterprise resource planning, supply chain management, computer security, electronic transaction processing, and other e-business issues. After completing this course, students should be able to understand the functions of the technologies that support e-business. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6810 - Communications for Accountants


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course is designed for MBA Accounting majors to acquire and practice the skills for effective CPA/client communications and to apply these skills during the written portions of the computer-based CPA exam. Emphasis will be placed on AICPA criteria of coherent organization, conciseness, clarity, responsiveness to questions, appropriateness to readers, and use of Standard English. Assignments will include CPA/client communications such as Letters of Engagement, communicating results of accounting reviews, accounting opinions, and notes to financial statements. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6820 - Fraud Examination


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5140 .
    This course will emphasize the conduct of fraud examinations, including a discussion of specific procedures used in forensic accounting examinations and the reasoning behind the use of these procedures. Coverage extends to detection, investigation, and prevention of specific types of fraud committed against organizations and individuals. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6835 - Corporate and Other Business Entities Tax


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    An interactive study of the tax treatment and nontax factors that influence business decision-making based on the legal and tax forms for conducting a business (sole proprietorship, partnership, Limited Liability Corporation, S Corporation, and C Corporation). This course focuses on the role of earnings and profits in corporate distributions, the qualified business income deduction for pass-through entities, and the tax effects on the owner(s) of the various business forms. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6845 - Government and Not-For-Profit Accounting


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    Provide accounting majors with the fundamentals of government and not-for-profit accounting standards and skills. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6855 - Accounting Research & Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    In the Accounting Research & Analysis course, students will use the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Codification and other nonauthoritative guidance to research a variety of accounting issues. Students will also prepare professional communications, both written and oral, to present the research findings. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 6860 - Becker CPA Review


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 ; Minimum of 30 graduate credits.
    Becker Conviser CPA Review - A four-part review course designed to prepare the student to sit for the new on-line CPA Exam. The four parts covered are: Financial Accounting & Reporting - This module covers general accounting concepts tested in this part of the CPA Exam. Coverage includes GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) for business enterprises, not-for-profit organizations, and governmental entities. It also addresses the necessary application skills. Auditing & Attestation - This module covers auditing practices and the required attestation as tested on this part of the CPA Exam. Coverage includes auditing procedures, GAAS (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards), and other related attest engagements. It also addresses the skills needed for application to those engagements, thus moving from theory to practice. Business Environment & Concepts - This module covers general business related topics as tested in this part of the CPA Exam. Coverage includes knowledge of general business environment and business concepts that candidates must know in order to understand the underlying business reasons for and accounting implications of business transactions. In addition, it also addresses the skills needed to apply that knowledge. Regulation - This module covers regulatory issues that are tested on this part of the CPA Exam. Coverage includes federal taxation, ethics, professional and legal responsibilities, and business law. It also addresses essential skills needed to apply this knowledge. Credit(s): 6
  
  • MBA 6861 - Becker CPA Review 1


    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 30 graduate credits. 
    The Becker CPA Review is a four-part review course designed to prepare students to sit for the Uniform CPA Exam. Students will choose two of the four exam reviews sections.

    The four parts covered are:

    1)  Financial Accounting & Reporting (FAR) - The content covered in this section includes conceptual framework, standard-setting and financial reporting, financial statement accounts and transactions, and state and local governments.

    2)  Auditing & Attestation (AUD) - The content covered in this section includes ethics and professional responsibilities, assessing risk and developing a planned response, performing further procedures and obtaining evidence, and forming conclusion and reporting.

    3)  Business Environment & Concepts (BEC) - The content covered in this section includes corporate governance, economic concepts and analysis, financial management, information technology and operations management.

    4)  Regulation (REG) - The content covered in this section includes ethics, business law, and taxation. Credit(s): 3

  
  • MBA 6862 - Becker CPA Review 2


    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 30 graduate credits.
    This course is a continuation of MBA 6861 , Becker CPA Review 1. The Becker CPA Review is a four-part review course designed to prepare students to sit for the Uniform CPA Exam. Students will complete the remaining two of the four exam reviews sections.

    The four parts covered are:

    1)  Financial Accounting & Reporting (FAR) - The content covered in this section includes conceptual framework, standard-setting and financial reporting, financial statement accounts and transactions, and state and local governments.

    2)  Auditing & Attestation (AUD) - The content covered in this section includes ethics and professional responsibilities, assessing risk and developing a planned response, performing further procedures and obtaining evidence, and forming conclusion and reporting.

    3)  Business Environment & Concepts (BEC) - The content covered in this section includes corporate governance, economic concepts and analysis, financial management, information technology and operations management.

    4)  Regulation (REG) - The content covered in this section includes ethics, business law, and taxation. Credit(s): 3

  
  • MBA 6863 - Becker CMA Review 1


    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 30 credits. 
    The Becker CMA Review is a two-part review course designed to prepare students to sit for the CMA exam. Students will chose one of the two exam review sections.

    The two parts covered are: 
    1. Financial planning, Performance, and Analytics. The content covered in this section includes external financial reporting decisions; planning, budgeting, and forecasting; perofrmance management; cost management; internal controls; and technology and analytics. 

    2. Strategic financial management. The content covered in this section includes financial statement analysis; corporate finance; decision analysis; risk management; investment decisions; professional ethics. Credit(s): 3

  
  • MBA 6864 - Becker CMA Review 2


    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 30 credits
    The Becker CMA Review is a two-part review course designed to prepare students to sit for the CMA exam. Students will chose one of the two exam review sections.

    The two parts covered are: 
    1. Financial planning, Performance, and Analytics. The content covered in this section includes external financial reporting decisions; planning, budgeting, and forecasting; perofrmance management; cost management; internal controls; and technology and analytics. 

    2. Strategic financial management. The content covered in this section includes financial statement analysis; corporate finance; decision analysis; risk management; investment decisions; professional ethics. Credit(s): 3

  
  • MBA 6990 - Business Praxis*


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 ; Permission of the College of Business Dean.
    Application of business skills, knowledge, and abilities to business projects and/or consulting experiences. This course may be repeated for additional credit. *International students only will select this course as a requirement for their CPT Credit(s): 1-3
  
  • MBA 7000 - Business Policy and Strategy


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 ; All core course completed.
    Enrollment requires advisor’s approval. A review of the applied research for managerial planning decisions and actions that assist in determining the long-run performance of organizations. Emphasis is placed on the process of strategy formulation, implementation, evaluation, and control for organizations of all sizes. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MBA 7100 - Global Business Practicum


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 ; All core courses completed; Permission of the College of Business Dean.
    The Global Business Practicum is designed to provide students with an immersive learning experience and allow them to apply leadership concepts learned in previous MBA courses while traveling to different cultural destinations.  Students will have opportunities to cultivate and strengthen global awareness, global perspectives and global competencies.  Students will be able to explore diverse cultural contexts and participate in the experiential learning that accompanies traveling to world destinations.  Travel can be organized either individually or in a group setting through Indiana Tech.  Students of the Global Business Practicum are expected to travel to a specific country to experience other cultures and learn about business cultures and practices at the respective destination by touring organizations and meeting with local leaders. Global practica must be approved in advance of the course by the Dean of the College of Business. Credit(s): 3

Master of Science in Engineering Management

  
  • MSE 5000 - Intro to Engineering Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An overview of the field of engineering management including, technical, management and integrated issues. Tools helpful throughout the program, such as research skills, will be introduced. The first course in the program. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 5400 - Supplier Quality


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course will provide the student with skills needed to oversee programs, policies, processes, procedures and controls necessary for ensuring that performance and quality of products/services conform to established standards. Topics include: Supplier alliances, Voice of the Customer and QFD, Customer specific requirements including PPAP, audits, ECNs, ISO/TS standards, Continuity of Supply, etc., Conduct and Ethics, Tools used in product and process planning (Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T), Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA), Design of Experiments (DOE), Simulation and Modeling, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Finite Element Analysis (FEA), Control documents), Non-conformance and corrective action. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 5950 - Curricular Practical Training for International Students


    Prerequisite(s): MSE 5000 .
    Curricular Practical Training (CPT) is defined as student work experience that is directly related to the MSE program. This employment is instrumental in helping the student achieve the MSE program objectives. Credit(s): 1-3
  
  • MSE 6010 - Environmental Health and Safety


    Prerequisite(s): MSE 5000 .
    An introduction to the state and federal regulations for safety and environmental compliance. This course also covers ISO standards for environmental health and safety. Students will learn to identify how standards apply to various industries and will apply these skills in performing an audit to determine if operations conform to the standards. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 6020 - Designing for Lean Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A study of the principles and practices necessary to establish/maintain a lean operation. Concepts covered include: theory of constraints, takt time, pull systems, lean accounting, value stream mapping, waste free manufacturing, workplace organization, quick change-over, just-in-time, and mistake-proofing. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn to apply these concepts in real-world situations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 6030 - Enterprise Resource Planning


    Prerequisite(s): MSE 5000 .
    Explores the relationship of existing and emerging processes and technologies to manufacturing strategy and supply chain-related functions. This course addresses three main topics: aligning resources with the strategic plan, configuring and integrating operating processes to support the strategic plan, and implementing change. Concepts introduced include supplier relationship management (SRM), strategic sourcing, throughput supply chain measurements such as inventory dollar days and throughput dollar days, product life cycle management (PLM), and customer relationship management (CRM). Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 6040 - Computer Integrated Manufacturing


    Prerequisite(s): MSE 5000 .
    Focuses on the integration of facilities (machines tools, robotics) and the automation protocols required in the implementation of computer integrated manufacturing. Specific concepts to be addressed will include concurrent engineering, rapid phototyping, interfaces between computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing systems (CAM), and control of manufacturing systems: numerical control (NC) and computer numerical control (CNC); programmable logic controller (PLC); computer aided process planning (CAPP) and manufacturing scheduling. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 6050 - Stat Methods in Quality Assurance


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The quantitative aspects of quality are studied, such as control charts, process capability, reliability, and design of experiments. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 6060 - Legal Implications for Engineering Managers


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A study of patent law, product liability, labor law and other legislation relevant to the engineering discipline. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSE 7000 - Advanced Topics in Engineering Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Integrates the elements of engineering management in a capstone, project-based environment. Last course of the program. Credit(s): 3

Master of Science in Management

  
  • MSM 5100 - Qualitative Decision-Making


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course will aid the student in using qualitative methods to identify the root cause of problems in business, evaluate alternative responses to these problems, and propose solutions. Emphasis is placed on the application of qualitative research methods to specific business problems and managerial decision-making. The course introduces methods that will be used to collect and interpret data for the applied management project capstone course (e.g., surveying, interviewing, and conducting focus groups). Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSM 5350 - Customer Relationship Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    Students will analyze organizations to develop effective strategies for customer relationship management. Students will evaluate customer touch points to improve customer service and build customer loyalty. Students will develop models to identify and measure individual perceptions to determine real customer needs. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSM 5400 - Negotiation Skills


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    Introduces the process of mutual gain by developing long-term relationships with negotiation partners. It will concentrate on strategies that are successful in business and will cover topics such as: separating the problem from the person, invention of options, and best alternatives. The course will utilize exercises and simulations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSM 6400 - Managing Change


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050  or MSOL 5000 .
    This course examines the role of change in organizations. A theoretical background in organization development will be introduced in tandem with practical skills and knowledge of change management. Students will define change, analyze factors that affect change, and learn how to effectively facilitate change in their organizations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSM 7200 - Applied Management Project


    Prerequisite(s): MSM 5100 ; MSM 6400 MSOL 5500 .
    This capstone course requires the student to synthesize and integrate the theoretical and practical knowledge that has been learned in the MSM curriculum. Students will design and implement projects that focus on real-world problems. Students will diagnose and present a problem to solve, design and implement an intervention, analyze any data, and provide feedback to the organization. Credit(s): 3

Master of Science in Organizational Leadership

  
  • MSOL 5000 - Leadership Styles & Development


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course provides a comprehensive analysis of major leadership theories and models. This exploration and assessment of personal leadership style and leadership dimensions lead to a final course outcome of a leadership journey assessment and action plan for each student. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 5400 - Building Organizational Excellence


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Achieving excellence in a variety of mission-critical dimensions is critical for all organizations in today’s competitive global economy. A comprehensive review of well researched theories and practitioner models are presented in this course including issues related to knowledge management, quality management, innovation management and the development of high performing teams and cultures. The impact of positive psychology on organizational excellence and global prospective are also explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 5500 - Financial Concepts for Leaders


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course provides an overview of the financial concepts that are necessary for responsible fiscal management of an organization. This course also focuses on impact of financial data on effective management and decision-making. The links between finance and strategic planning and implications for overall health and success of the organization are explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 5999 - Special Topics in Organizational Leadership


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of organizational leadership. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
  • MSOL 6600 - Leadership Problem Analysis and Dec


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Research indicates the daily activities of leaders and managers focus largely on problem analysis and decision making. This course provides a through understanding of the fundamental models, tactics and tools of this critical leadership competency. Core topics include critical thinking, problem analysis and decision support tools and techniques, and the basics of project management. The role of the leader in group decision making, conflict resolution and negotiation strategy is also reviewed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 6700 - Developing Human Capital


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Contemporary management literature emphasizes the importance of human capital as organizations strive to create a competitive advantage in today’s knowledge and service economies. This course provides an in-depth review of models and strategies of human capital development including integrated talent management, individual and management development and competency modeling. Strategic human resources and a global perspective on human capital development are also examined. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 6800 - Leading Strategy


    Prerequisite(s): MSOL majors: MSOL 5400 MSOL 6700 . MSM majors: MSM 6400 ; MBA 5600 .
    An organization is able to compete more effectively when there is a shared understanding among the leaders and team members regarding the strategic direction and the requirements needed to achieve organizational goals. This course provides a comprehensive understanding of various theoretical perspectives on strategy and strategic planning as well as practitioner models used in organizations. The critical role of the leader in the strategic planning process is also evaluated. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 7400 - Leadership Project I


    Prerequisite(s): MSOL 5400 MSOL 6700 .
    This is the first course in a three-course capstone sequence. This sequence of courses provides students with an opportunity to explore organizational issues in-depth through original research and communicate results in a graduate level environment. In this first course, having the theoretical and practical knowledge learned throughout the organizational leadership curriculum, students will develop the initial sections of the project (Abstract, Introduction, and Review of Related Literature). This course should be taken in the last half of the program. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 7500 - Leadership Project II


    Prerequisite(s): MSOL 7400 .
    This is the second course in a three-course sequence and is a continuation of MSOL 7400. Students will go through the IRB (Institutional Review Board) process and add the Design & Methodology section to the project started in the previous course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MSOL 7600 - Leadership Project III


    Prerequisite(s): MSOL 7500 .
    This is the third in a three-course sequence and is a continuation of MSOL 7500. Students will complete the project by adding the Findings, Conclusions, and Recommendations sections. Credit(s): 3

Master of Science in Psychology

  
  • MPSY 5050 - Writing in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The development of graduate level writing, reading, critical thinking and literature search skills will be emphasized. The course will focus on how to interpret, synthesize, and draw conclusions about psychological research and create a coherent review of the literature. A review of American Psychological Association (APA) style documentation for experimental reports and literature reviews will also be covered. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 5100 - Multicultural Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course surveys relevant theories, research, assessment and practice of multicultural psychology and the factors important to issues of cultural and individual differences. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 5200 - Lifespan Development


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The focus of this course will be to survey the cognitive, psychological, moral, social, emotional, physical and spiritual development of humans throughout the lifespan from birth to death. A developmental framework for understanding issues that impact normal development will be studied. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 5400 - Advanced Counseling Theory


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is intended to be an examination of the main forces of psychotherapy. Several major theories used to understand human thoughts, feelings and behaviors within the main forces of psychotherapy will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 5600 - Statistics for Behavioral Sciences


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is a survey of the statistical techniques commonly used in psychological research including such topics as correlation, linear regression, t-tests, ANOVA and Chi Squares. Introduction to a computer-based statistical software package will be presented given the computation intensive nature of these techniques. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 5800 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is designed to be an overview of the local and federal laws that govern the practice of psychology. In addition, the ethical guidelines that shape the practice of psychology in various different settings will be studied. Students will examine ethical dilemmas faced by those who work in the psychological field. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6000 - Psychopathology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is an examination of the issues and controversies related to the conceptualization and diagnosis of mental disorders. The etiology, onset, symptoms, clinical features and prognosis for mental disorders throughout the lifespan will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6200 - Advanced Social Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is designed to explore topics within social psychology in depth through the use of empirical journal articles as well as texts. Students will be provided an opportunity to develop deeper knowledge of many of the major studies within the field of social psychology. Students will be encouraged to form connections between course material and their own experiences as social psychology topics are issues that occur in our everyday lives. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6510 - Substance Abuse Theories and Techniques


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This elective course is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of substance abuse theories and counseling approaches. A biopsychosocial framework will be presented to assist in understanding addictive behaviors and substance use and abuse. The philosophies related to prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery will also be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6600 - Research Methods in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): MPSY 5600 .
    This course is an overview of the research methods and techniques used within the field of psychology. The focus of the course will be on the evaluation of research methodology as well as the examination of the process involved in designing a research project. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6800 - Advanced Biopsychology


    Prerequisite(s): MPSY 5050 .
    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of normal and abnormal human behaviors from the perspective of brain functioning. A review of the foundational knowledge and examination of current research of the relationship between biological function of the brain and nervous system/neuroanatomy will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • MPSY 6920 - Capstone Course: Master of Science in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): All MS Psychology courses completed.
    This capstone course is designed to assess the student’s knowledge gained throughout the entire Master of Science in psychological program. The course will consist of a comprehensive exam that will be composed of various components directly related to the program learning outcomes and the courses completed within the degree program. Credit(s): 3

Ph.D. in Global Leadership

  
  • GHL 7001 - Global Community Healthcare & Epidemiology for Leaders


    Prerequisite(s): RES 7000 ; RES 7013 .
    This course presents a broad overview of healthcare systems and the impact of global leadership on these environments. The nature and function of community health and the implication in the processes of healthcare are explored. Health determinants and epidemiological concepts are presented in a variety of community health settings across a spectrum of disease topics using the application of evidence-based assessment to improve community wellness. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7001 - Theories & Research in Academic Leadership


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Critically analyze theories, research and best practices about academic leadership and culture employed by individuals and organizations in higher education in the United States and globally. How culture, national and international politics, and institutional mission inform higher education leadership is examined. Mission, vision and function of public, private, not for profit and for profit colleges and universities; leadership roles; governance functions including shared governance; union and non-union organizations; relationships with internal and external constituencies; problems of practice and power will be analyzed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7002 - Higher Education Policy & Accountability


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Policy and issues in higher education. Analysis of public expectations of higher education including accountability for student learning and transparency of operating functions. Contemporary public policy issues such as access, affordability, affirmative action, funding for scientific research are analyzed. Practices in accreditation, relationships among institutions to maximize opportunities for students and to provide diverse experiences in order to be prepared to enter the global society, and strategies to adapt to expanding reporting requirements will be compared and critically analyzed to determine best practices. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7003 - Legal Issues in Higher Education


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Higher education legal processes, rights, responsibilities, duties and liabilities of faculty, administrators, and students within the context of higher education. Topics such as academic freedom, affirmative action, free speech, disability rights and access/use of electronically accessed information will be analyzed. Studies from constitutional, statutory, and case law will be addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7004 - Managing for Financial Performance & Accountability


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course is a shared course for OLM and HEA students.
     
    Critical analysis of theoretical and empirical literature, and best practices about managing innovation and the learning organization. The key transformational role of technology and its impact on emerging core organizational learning capabilities are emphasized. Collaborative work environments, diffusion of innovation, systems thinking, and the technology adoption cycle are examined as means to improve organizational capabilities and managerial competencies required to promote innovation and a learning organization. The cultural structures and processes of a learning organization are explored.
     
    Comparative study of current trends in higher education in the United States and globally including curricular models, delivery methods, cultural influences and implications; global institutional partnerships; governmental involvement, accountability and reporting requirements. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7005 - Comparative Higher Education


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Comparative study of current trends in higher education in the United States and globally including curricular models, delivery methods, cultural influences and implications; global institutional partnerships; governmental involvement, accountability and reporting requirements. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7006 - The Contemporary College Student


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Intellectual, social, psychological, and cultural contexts of the student experience. Leadership role in meeting student and societal expectations for integrated learning and social experiences. Providing appropriate and high quality experiences to students of varying abilities, needs and expectations. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7011 - Theories & Research in Academic Leadership


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An introduction to the topics and issues related to guiding a university in the complexities and climate of the 21st century.  Issues covered will include mission, vision, and function of public, private, not for profit, and for-profit colleges and universities; leadership roles; governance functions including shared governance, union, and non-union governance models; advancement, fundraising, and relationships with internal and external constituencies.  An underlaying emphasis examines how culture, national and international politics, and institutional mission inform higher education leadership. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7012 - The Academic Leader


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Academic leadership in higher education is a changing and demanding role. This course provides an overview of the responsibilities for those who would establish and maintain the academic standards of the university. Topics to be examined will include curricular alignment with the mission; curriculum management and delivery; recruitment, training, promotion, and retention of faculty; accreditation and public policy issues such as access, affordability, equity and inclusion, funding for academic research. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7013 - Legal Issues in Higher Education


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Participants in this course will examine the major laws that impact the decision making of higher education leaders and critically analyze higher education legal processes, rights, responsibilities, duties and liabilities of faculty, administrators, and students for navigating and managing the legal environment of higher education. Topics such as admissions, academic freedom, affirmative action, collective bargaining, disability rights and access/use of electronically accessed information, due process, free speech, financial aid, licensure, and privacy, as well as studies from constitutional, statutory, and case law will be addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7014 - Administration and Finance in Higher Education


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Examination of common financial reports and their purposes and uses. Identification of the revenue sources and expenses applicable to higher education institutions of different types, public, private, not for profit, and for-profit.  Design and leadership of budgeting processes to address the institution’s strategic planning processes and linkage to mission and purposes.  Overview of commonly used financial formulas to determine institutional viability.  Students will link with current higher education financial officers to investigate practices to address current issues they are addressing and potential strategies for action. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7015 - Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Higher Education


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    As campuses become increasingly global and diverse, it is important for administrators to understand the importance of issues of compliance, equity, and inclusion for students, faculty, and staff. Topics including nationality, race, culture, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, and disabilities are explored as well as the implications for implementation within the classroom, curriculum, and campus-wide recruitment. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7016 - Student Affairs Administration


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Understanding the changing nature of the student body and the predominant student development theories for providing leadership to those who work within this field is the focus of this course.  Topics include student rights and responsibilities, student development, recruitment/enrollment, financial aid, traditional and non-traditional student populations, student housing and activities, athletics, student health promotion, and career development. Credit(s): 3
  
  • HEA 7990 - Special Topics in Higher Education Administration


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Students in the higher education administration concentration will pursue coursework designed to prepare them for increasing leadership in higher education. This specialty is ideal for faculty in the field of leadership or related disciplines as well as administrators in areas such as academic affairs, student services, financial aid, admissions, or athletics. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7001 - Leadership Theory & Research


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A foundational course in the critical analysis of seminal theoretical and empirical leadership theories, research and best practices. The concepts and dimensions of leadership are evaluated from the early trait and behavioral theories to the more recent theories which emphasize transformational and servant leadership models. Ethics and morality in leadership decision-making and case studies that examine emerging leadership situations are also analyzed. This course is taken within the first 0 to 18 credits of the Ph.D. program. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7002 - Leading in a Time of Global Change


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Literature and best practices related to the emerging roles of the leader as an agent of change are examined. Theories and models of change management are evaluated including organizational learning, organizational development, appreciative inquiry, sense-making and contingency approaches. Also examined are forces for change, diagnosis for change, visioning, resistance to change, the recipients of change, and consolidating change. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7003 - Communication in Global & Diverse Context


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Communications literature and best practices are analyzed to understand and maximize human interaction in global and diverse contexts. Effective communication for various leadership roles is examined including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and public situations. Skills to develop intercultural competence and evaluating communication barriers that prevent the understanding of a leaders message are explored. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7004 - Ethics, Governance & Social Responsibility


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Ethical theories and research are examined, along with professional codes of conduct and best practices for effective ethical leadership in global organizations. A review of recurring ethical dilemmas results in the development of a personal code of ethics appropriate for global leadership. The literature and best practices related to the leaders role in promoting effective governance for a healthy organization along with social responsibility and sustainable development are examined. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7005 - Global Leadership Development


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    From a global perspective, leadership development models are analyzed with a focus on organizational and individual outcomes. Leadership development practices are evaluated as they relate to and impact the development of intellectual capital, organizational innovation, talent management, succession planning and executive selection criteria. Leadership development programs for expatriates and effective modes of leadership development for different countries and cultures are analyzed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • LDS 7006 - Global Talent Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Classic and recent research, models and best practices for the development of human capital are examined. Approaches to linking organizational strategy, culture, and human resources practices are evaluated with an emphasis on talent development and the use of human capital to create a competitive advantage. Processes to develop and measure individual and team performance are examined. The unique challenges of leading project, virtual and remote teams are analyzed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLHE 7005 - Managing Financial Performance & Accountability


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Critical analysis of theoretical and empirical literature, and best practices for managing private and public organizations to achieve financial accountability and financial performance. Accounting as a managerial tool for assessment of business strategy and tactical implementation are examined. Principles of financial management focusing on the development and use of budgets for planning and control, demonstrating accountability, and establishing priorities within an organization are analyzed. The use of financial data to lead decision-making links between finance and strategic planning, and Sarbanes-Oxley are explored. Creating shareholder value is analyzed, along with links to customer loyalty. Cash flow management, international financial reporting and consolidations employing currency conversions, and the standards of ethical behavior in various countries are examined. NOTE- this shared course is applied to either OLM 7005 or HEA 7004 course requirements based on student concentration choice. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLHE 7008 - Global Practicum


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The main purpose of the course is to introduce students to indigenous or local leadership theories and practices by providing immersive experiential learning experience and traveling to different cultural destinations. The students are able to apply global leadership concepts studied in global leadership courses to understand leadership phenomena as they manifest across the world. Finally, in addition to experiencing native cultures and learning about local leadership characteristics, students enhance research methods knowledge and skills. World destinations for global practicums differ, and additional descriptions of activities varies per destination. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLM 7001 - International Organizational Behavior & Culture


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course gives an in-depth view of available theory and research on the behavior, structure, culture and process on international and global organizations. Formal organizations and their structure will be critically examined and applicable behavioral science theories, including non-Western theories and models, will be explored through case studies and article reviews. Theory & Application-based course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLM 7002 - Strategic Branding & Public Relations


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course offers an overview of the key elements of branding and public relations (PR) and their role in multinational organizations and global society as a whole. Strategic marketing decisions made at the organizational level and organizational issues affecting the creation and implementation of internal and external PR efforts will be covered. Application-based course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLM 7003 - Multinational Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course focuses on the behavior, management and cross cultural aspects of managing in a global organization. Current theory and research on international management, multinational corporations, and government policies affecting international business will be examined. Preparation of an academic paper suitable for a conference submission or publication will be the final course outcome. Theory-based course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLM 7004 - Managing Innovation & the Learning Organization


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course critically examines innovation and the theories and models that support planning and process development and how they can be implemented. It investigates how leaders who initiate and direct major organizational shifts can mobilize, focus, generate commitment, and implement new directions in a multinational organization. The course combines theory, case material, models and accounts of how and why organizations change their cultures, purposes, structures, and/or operational processes. Students will undertake a detailed analysis of an organizational innovation they have experienced in their professional life. Theory & Application-based course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • OLM 7006 - International Strategy & Decision Making


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    In this course the role of decision making and foundations of strategic management and leadership will be explored. Overall strategies and their effect on organizational performance will be explored. Overall strategies and their effect on organizational performance will be explored. Students will create their own strategies using theoretical decision-making models. Theory & Application-based course. Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7000 - Introduction to Research Methods


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course emphasizes basic principles and techniques employed in social and behavior science research methods. More specifically, students will review a variety of research methods and will be introduced to basics of research design. The course will discuss sampling techniques, descriptive, inferential statistics, and basics of testing hypothesis. Students will practice formulating research questions and hypothesis; and interpreting and critiquing statistical results found in peer-reviewed empirical studies.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7011 - Research Critique


    Prerequisite(s): RES 7000 .
    This course helps enhance students’ skills in conceptual argument construction and research analysis. Students will review empirical studies in global leadership and critically evaluate structure, effectiveness, logic and flow of arguments. Students will also examine research purpose, effective hypothesis construction, variables, and research critique. In addition, students will learn about basic and applied natures of research. Finally students will practice writing research proposals to reflect the applied nature of global leadership scholarship. Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7012 - Research Design


    Prerequisite(s): RES 7000 RES 7011 .
    The purpose of this course is to advance students’ understanding of theory formation and provide students with skills to design effective research in applied settings. The course will examine selection and application of different qualitative and quantitative methodologies for conducting research. It will also evaluate effective research based on connection between methods, data, and arguments. Students will be required to develop a research proposal for an applied project to convert challenges faced by global leaders into research questions or hypotheses and design an applied study that addresses them.  Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7013 - Quantitative Methods of Research


    Prerequisite(s): RES 7000 ; RES 7011 RES 7012 .
    This course focuses on the application of quantitative research methods. It presumes basic knowledge of the research process and familiarity with quantitative studies in the field of global leadership. Students will use SPSS software application to analyze bivariate and mulivariate parametic and non-parametric statistics, and will interpret and report results in a series of exercises. The course will introduce general purpose and description of the factor analysis; and general purpose of the structural equation modeling. Students will evaluate peer-reviewed research articles, apply course content to design a research proposal, and conduct a pilot study to answer research questions or test hypotheses. Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7014 - Qualitative Methods of Research


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The course is designed to provide students with more in-depth understanding of naturalistic, qualitative research methods. Students will review philosophical assumptions underlying qualitative paradigms and will learn about design, purposeful sampling, field work, and data collection methods. Course will introduce students to current data analysis techniques and computer software used to analyze qualitative studies. Students will also gain first-hand experience in the qualitative research process by designing and conducting a study, analyzing and interpreting their data, and writing and presenting a report on their findings. Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 7015 - Global Leadership Research


    Prerequisite(s): RES 7000 ; RES 7011 RES 7012 .
    The purpose of this course is to examine a development of leadership theory in different cultures and to learn about nuances of conducting international studies. Such topics as working with an international sample; collaborating with international scholars; cultural philosophical assumptions and frames of references and their influence of theory development; challenges with a concept translation; and publication standards in international scholarly outlets are among a few topics examined in the course. This course will also enable students to evaluate generalizability of research finding in Western leadership studies. Finally, students will analyze leadership studies published by scholars from Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Middle East. Applications for theory development as well as for leadership development will be discussed. Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 8001 - Doctoral Research Seminar and Prospectus


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Under the principle guidance of the course instructor and in consultation with the dissertation chair, students develop the dissertation prospectus, complete an elevator speech, and discuss IRB requirements. The dissertation prospectus presents the research problem, study purpose, justification (significance, feasibility, and researchable), and definition of terms; a brief synopsis of the literature, including research gaps, research questions, research hypotheses, and theoretical framework.    Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 8002 - Dissertation Proposal Development


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Used during continuation of work on the dissertation, this course is necessary to comply with the continuous registration requirement of the degree program. The course serves two purposes: (1) Students that made sufficient progress in RES 8001 but did not complete the prospectus and mock defense, and received an In Progress course grade (IP) during the first term of enrollment in RES 8001, may continue to work on the prospectus and mock defense with the RES 8001 course faculty for additional terms and enroll in RES 8002. (2) Students that passed RES 8001, enroll in RES 8002 in the dissertation chairs section, form a dissertation committee, develop the dissertation proposal, successfully defend the dissertation proposal before the dissertation committee, and submit an IRB application. A dissertation proposal includes completed first three chapters of the dissertation, and relevant front and back matter. The IRB application, which includes the Research Protocol, certifications and signatures, and curriculum vitae of the principal investigator, is submitted to the Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects Research (IRB). A maximum of 6 terms of RES 8002 may be taken. Final grading is the responsibility of the Dissertation Committee Chair and is IP grade or P grade. Prerequisite: RES 8001 (IP grade or P Grade). 1 to 6 credits (1 credit minimum, up to a maximum of 6 credits) Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 8111 - Continuous Development of the Qualifying Paper


    Prerequisite(s): All coursework including RES 8001 .
    During this course, students write the Qualifying Paper in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Ph.D. in Global Leadership program. The dissertation committee chairperson collaborates with the student and provides feedback on all drafts submitted by the student. All committee members comment and provide feedback on the final draft copy. The Qualifying Paper defense will be scheduled and conducted after the committee members determine student readiness for the defense. May be repeated once (total of two times). Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 8221 - Continuous Development of Proposal


    Prerequisite(s): RES 8111 .
    Students work independently, under the guidance and in consultation with the Committee Chair, to develop the first three chapters of the dissertation. The content and outline of the chapters are guided by the standards of the Global Leadership Program. The student is expected to develop, write, and defend the dissertation proposal (including completing the IRB documents) prior to engaging in the proposed research.  After the proposal has been reviewed and approved by the Committee, the Chair will schedule a Proposal Defense. Following the successful defense, the student is to file for IRB approval before moving ahead with the research. May be repeated twice (total of three times). Credit(s): 3
  
  • RES 8331 - Continuous Development of Dissertation


    Prerequisite(s): RES 8111 ; RES 8221 .
    Students enrolled in RES 8331 will work independently, under the guidance and in consultation with the Committee Chair, to develop the dissertation. The content and outline of the chapters will be guided by the standards of the Global Leadership program, but the student will be expected to develop, write, and defend the dissertation. After the dissertation has been reviewed and approved by the Committee, the Chair will schedule a Dissertation defense. After the successful defense, the student will submit the final manuscript to the Ph.D. program office for finalization. This course may be repeated three times (for a total of four times). Credit(s): 3
 

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