Jan 30, 2023  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses described below are listed in numerical order by discipline. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. If laboratory periods are required they are indicated after the description. For example, the notation “3+1” indicates 3 class periods and 1 lab period per week.

 

Psychology

  
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    PSY 4510 - Learning and Cognition


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Contemporary perspectives and ideas about how human beings think and learn. Learning theory will be related to everyday practice through numerous examples which will emphasize meaningful learning and true understanding of the material. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4520 - Advanced Abnormal Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2520 .
    This advanced course builds on the student’s understanding of Abnormal Behavior through the exploration of Clinical Case studies. The student also builds understanding of the diagnostic criteria necessary for labeling a psychological problem. Specific Diagnostic features; subtypes and/or specifiers; recording procedures; associated features; specific culture, age and gender features; prevalence; course; familial pattern; and, differential diagnosis also addressed. Student also exposed to clinical note preparation and treatment planning skills development. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4530 - Health Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    Surveys the psychological, social and behavioral factors related to physical health promotion and the role psychology plays in fostering positive health practices. The course covers health related topics that include stress and coping; cardiovascular disease; chronic pain management and arthritis; cancer; risky health practices (smoking, substance abuse) as well as a look at communicable and chronic diseases. Community access to health care systems and health related policies are also addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4540 - Forensic Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 CJ 1100 .
    Introduction to the practice of forensic psychology. Exploration of how forensic psychologists aid the legal system by serving as expert witnesses, crime profilers, and trial consultants for jury selection and child custody hearings. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4560 - Drugs and Addictions


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 .
    This course is designed to examine contemporary drug use in our society from behavioral, biological, and social perspectives. Furthermore, a review of prevention and treatment approaches towards drug and alcohol abuse and addictions will be examined. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4600 - Addictions Theory/Counseling Skills


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 4560 .
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of addiction theories and counseling approaches. A bio-psychosocial framework will be presented to assist in understanding addictive behaviors and substance use and abuse. The philosophies related to prevention, intervention, treatment planning, family education and recovery will also be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4950 - Psychology/Addictions Internship I


    Prerequisite(s): Approval of academic advisor.
    This course will be conducted in a seminar format. It is designed to provide students with applied practice through field experience in mental health or addiction settings as well as additional supervision. Students will complete 120 hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved setting that serves individuals with mental health or addiction issues. The specific work setting and work responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Forty hours in the work setting will equal one academic credit. Students will complete 120 hours of work experience over the course of the semester to receive 3 academic credits for the course. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4951 - Psychology/Addictions Internship II


    Prerequisite(s): Approval of academic advisor.
    This course will be conducted in a seminar format. It is designed to provide students with applied practice through field experience in mental health or addiction settings as well as additional supervision. Students will complete 120 hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved setting that serves individuals with mental health or addiction issues. The specific work setting and work responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Forty hours in the work setting will equal one academic credit. Students will complete 120 hours of work experience over the course of the semester to receive 3 academic credits for the course. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4952 - Psychology/Addictions Internship III


    Prerequisite(s): Approval of academic advisor.
    This course will be conducted in a seminar format. It is designed to provide students with applied practice through field experience in mental health or addiction settings as well as additional supervision. Students will complete 120 hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved setting that serves individuals with mental health or addiction issues. The specific work setting and work responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Forty hours in the work setting will equal one academic credit. Students will complete 120 hours of work experience over the course of the semester to receive 3 academic credits for the course. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4953 - Child and Adolescent Internship I


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 4370 ; Senior standing.
    This course will be conducted in a seminar format. It is designed to provide students with applied practice through field experience with children and adolescents in a social service setting as well as additional supervision. Students will complete 80-120 hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved social service setting that serves children/adolescents. The specific work setting and work responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Forty hours in the work setting will equal one academic credit. Students can complete either 80 or 120 hours of work experience over the course of the semester to receive either 2 or 3 credits for the course. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4954 - Child and Adolescent Internship II


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 4370 ; Senior standing.
    This course will be conducted in a seminar format. It is designed to provide students with applied practice through field experience with children and adolescents in a social service setting as well as additional supervision. Students will complete 80-120 hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved social service setting that serves children/adolescents. The specific work setting and work responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Forty hours in the work setting will equal one academic credit. Student can complete either 80 or 120 hours of work experience over the course of the semester to receive 2 credits for the course. Credit(s): 2
  
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    PSY 4960 - Senior Seminar in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1750 ; PSY 2520 ; PSY 3780 .
    Discussion and exploration of current topics in the field of psychology. Specific topics selected for study vary from year to year. An APA formatted research proposal with IRB approval and subsequent presentation is required. Emphasis on allowing students to pursue research in areas of specific interest. Credit(s): 3
  
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    PSY 4990 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Prerequisite(s): Advisor approval.
    Directed study in a special body of subject matter in psychology. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Recreation

  
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    REC 1200 - Introduction to Recreation Service


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An overview of recreation services; from governmental, non-profit, and commercial agencies, types of recreation services, and theories related to recreation, play and leisure studies. Credit(s): 3
  
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    REC 2000 - Recreation Programming


    Prerequisite(s): REC 1200 .
    A study of the principles and techniques in recreation programming. Includes philosophical foundations, needs assessment, goal and objective writing, program planning, and evaluation methods. Practice in program planning, delivery of leisure service, and leadership techniques. Credit(s): 3
  
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    REC 2500 - Community and Outdoor Recreation


    Prerequisite(s): REC 1200 .
    Examines various aspects of community and outdoor recreation including the importance of leisure, fundamentals of outdoor and community recreation, natural resource issues and resource management. Credit(s): 3
  
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    REC 4200 - Legal Issues in Recreation and Sports


    Prerequisite(s): REC 1200 .
    This course will familiarize students with the legal issues in the recreation and sports fields. They will be introduced to the legal process and current trends in risk management. Negligence, torts, constitutional rights, personnel rights, and standards of care will be addressed along with how to do risk assessments on your facilities to better protect your clients, yourself, and your agency. Credit(s): 3

Recreation Therapy

  
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    RT 1200 - Foundations of Recreation Therapy


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course explores the philosophy and psychology of recreation as therapy. It introduces students to recreation therapy theories, models, terminology, and the psychology of disability issues and how it relates to the field of recreation therapy. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 2100 - Disabling Cond. & RT Impact


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 .
    An exploration of the role of recreation therapy services in the rehabilitation of individuals with a variety of disabilities. Topics include, but are not limited to: discussions on various disorders in the cognitive, psychosocial and affective domains, symptoms and characteristics, etiology, prevalence, and treatment approaches. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 2600 - Recreation Therapy Practicum


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 .
    One hundred twenty hours of volunteer/work experience in an approved recreation therapy setting. Theory is coordinated with practical experience. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 3000 - Client Assessment & Evaluation


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 .
    An examination of a variety of assessment tools and evaluation techniques commonly used in the field of recreation therapy. Strong focus on goal and objective formation and how these connect to assessment and evaluation. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 3400 - Processes and Techniques


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 .
    This course explores the variety of modalities, techniques and processes used as tools to treat individuals with disabilities in clinical, rehabilitative and community settings. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 3700 - Administration & Management in Recreation Therapy


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 
    Many aspects of management in the RT field such as theory, organizational behavior, financial management and budgeting and human resource management will be covered in this course. Topics more specific to RT such as group development, working within the health care field and with other health care professionals and managing volunteers and interns are included. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 4200 - Advancement of the Profession


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 
    This course will focus on the importance of professionalism, continuing education in the recreation therapy field, and advocacy for our clients. It will cover such topics as legislation which affects our clients and our field, certification, professional standards and ethics, and being active in professional associations, and how those topics relate to the advancement of the recreation therapy profession. Credit(s): 3
  
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    RT 4950 - Recreation Therapy Internship


    Prerequisite(s): RT 1200 ; RT 2600 ; 6 additional credits of RT.
    A 600-hour professional experience in an approved setting related to the field. The specific work setting and type of responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Work responsibilities should be professional in nature and should not duplicate the RT 2600 Practicum. Theory is coordinated with practical experience. 6000 hour option is required to apply for possible national certification. Credit(s): 6-14

Science

  
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    SCI 2000 - Contemporary Issues in Science


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1025 ; ENG 1252 .
    An introduction to the fundamentals of science as it applies to various contemporary issues. This course introduces the nature of science and the scientific method, and deals in depth with the nature of sources and evaluation of the credibility of sources. Specific topics may vary, but may include the following: food and energy; organic compounds in everyday life; greenhouse gases; green chemistry; laws of thermodynamics; energy production, transportation, and usage; electricity; fossil fuels; renewable fuels; nuclear energy; alternative energy sources. Credit(s): 3

Social Science

  
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    SS 1110 - American Government


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course introduces the student to the meaning of politics, its relationship to the concept of political power, and its impact upon governmental policy making. The course explores the nature and history of our political system and the various philosophical principles upon which it is based, and discusses national government institutions and the operation of national, state and local governments. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2110 - Introduction to Anthropology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The place of human beings in nature, with a comparative approach to our physical emergence and cultural evolution, including the development of social systems and technologies, problems arising from the interactions of biological and cultural phenomena. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2410 - World History


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Human cultural development through a historic approach to pivotal periods, ideas, inventions and innovations in the evolution of civilization including regional an planet-wide perspectives. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2430 - Early United States History


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The growth toward democracy in a new nation, and transition from nationalism to sectionalism during the period 1775 through the Civil War. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2440 - History of Modern America


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    The Civil War, reconstruction, corruption, reform, industrialization, internationalism, and isolationism from 1865 to the present. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2460 - African-American History and Culture


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    A survey of African-American history in America from 1619 to the present as seen through art, literature, and the teachings of several prominent black leaders. Through study of the teachings and philosophies of the black leadership, the student will compare the issues of the past with contemporary problems facing the African-American in today’s society. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2720 - Group Dynamics


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Psychology of groups; normal and developmental growth; development of leadership styles, emphasis on assessment of group change. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2800 - Introduction to Sociology


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    An introduction to the scientific study of human society and social behavior, this course examines sociological theories of human behavior, cultural patterns, and social change. Emphasis upon the influence of social and cultural forces on personal experience and social behavior in reference to the postindustrial society. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2810 - Social Problems


    Prerequisite(s): SS 2800 .
    Analysis of problem conditions in modern society in areas such as the family, economic order, crime, civil rights, ethnic and religious tensions, and the environment. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2820 - Marriage and the Family


    Prerequisite(s): SS 2800 .
    Provides further understanding of family relations for those unmarried, for those contemplating marriage, for those married and for prospective marriage counselors. A functional approach to the interpersonal relationships of courtship, marriage and family are also explored. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2850 - Conflict Resolution


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Conflict resolution in both personal and professional settings. Why we have conflicts, and on what levels. The course examines ways to analyze conflict and how to develop mutually beneficial resolutions by using a range of conflict resolution methods and techniques. Current and popular theoretical approaches also are examined. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2900 - Community & Social Movements


    Prerequisite(s): SS 2800 .
    This course provides a review of community and social movements including historical perspectives. The course will help students connect with community work and social movements established to accomplish social change in our society. An examination of the individual’s role as social advocate and effective citizen will be completed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 2990 - Special Topics in Social Science


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Arts & Sciences.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of Social Sciences. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    SS 3300 - Sport in Society


    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1700 SS 2800 .
    An examination of the growth of sports and the sports of industry in society. Historical, sociological, and psychological aspects are examined including consideration of sports as a means of social mobility and character building. Problems such as drug usage, scandals within sports, and cheating are also addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SS 4960 - Capstone in Diversity Studies


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other certificate courses; Approval of advisor.
    This course will serve as a capstone to the Diversity Studies Undergraduate Certificate. Students in this course will complete a project and portfolio designed to synthesize the material learned in the five courses designated as part of their Diversity and Inclusion Certificate program. The portfolio should demonstrate an understanding of both the theories and practices of diversity and inclusion. Credit(s): 1-3
  
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    SS 4990 - Special Topics in Social Science


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Arts & Sciences.
    Directed study in a special body of subject matter in the Social Sciences. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Software Engineering

  
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    SE 1100 - Introduction to Software Engineering Projects


    Prerequisite(s): MA 1090 .
    Open only to software engineering majors. Introduction to software engineering draws the distinction between programming and software engineering. Students are introduced to the stages of the software engineering life cycle. Topics such as requirements elicitation, requirements conception, project planning, software quality assurance, testing, and maintenance are emphasized in daily course lectures. These principles are then utilized during projects. The projects will vary in length and will be completed either collectively as a class, in smaller groups, or individually. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 2100 - Software Engineering Project I


    Prerequisite(s): SE 1100 .
    The software engineering life cycle principles emphasized in SE 1100 are utilized during projects. The projects will vary in length and will be completed both collectively as a class as well as in individual groups. The importance of customer needs is stressed. This includes but is not limited to comprehensive requirements writing, accurate project planning (leading to timely completion), thorough testing of the product and delivery. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 2110 - Software Engineering Project II


    Prerequisite(s): SE 2100 .
    Projects will be completed paying particular attention to Quality Assurance (QA) which covers all activities including design, development, production, installation, servicing and documentation. Other topics include failure testing, statistical control, and total quality control. Introduces current models like Capability Maturity Model integration (CMMI). Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 2120 - Software Engineering Project III


    Prerequisite(s): SE 2110 .
    Projects will be completed that focus on platform porting. Case studies will be created to determine which platforms are most effective for the job and when applicable, how to port from one platform to another based on customer needs. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 2990 - Special Topics in Software Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of program director.
    Course of study agreed upon by the student and his or her advisor; intended to extend the breadth of a student’s education which may or may not relate directly to software engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    SE 3110 - Software Engineering Project IV


    Prerequisite(s): SE 2110 .
    Projects may originate internally or be solicited from Indiana Tech’s industry partners that introduce another level of realism and practical experience. These projects will include proposal writing, project planning, requirements composition, design, test, quality assurance, user documentation and delivery. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 3120 - Software Engineering Project V


    Prerequisite(s): SE 3110 .
    A continuation of SE 3110.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    SE 4950 - Software Engineering Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the program director.
    Software Engineering Internship is an opportunity to apply the principles learned in the classroom to the real world. A student’s success will be determined by the employer in conjunction with the portfolio maintained throughout the semester. Credit(s): 1-12
  
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    SE 4960 - SE Project/Directive Studies


    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing in Software Engineering program.
    This course may be structured in different ways as determined by the program director in consultation with the student. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    SE 4990 - Special Topics in Software Engineering


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the program director.
    Course of study agreed upon by the student and his or her advisor; intended to extend the breadth of a student’s education which may or may not relate directly to software engineering. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6

Sports Management

  
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    SM 1400 - Introduction to Sports Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Introduction to the management and business principles of sport in profit and nonprofit organizations. Specific topics include career and internship opportunities, ethical considerations, the evolution of the sport management career field and future trends in the industry. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 2300 - Sport Economics & Financial Analysis


    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2200  or ECON 2210 .
    This course introduces students to the foundations and principles of sport economics and related financial concepts, such as; sports leagues, and franchises methods of determining value, models of economic assessment, supply demand, elasticity of price in a sports-driven market, economic trends of sport products, economic impact of Sport Events and related Sports Labor Markets and Collective Bargaining, and the economic methods employed to administer Intercollegiate Sport in the USA. Students will be excepted to develop their critical thinking in regard to this course material; this involves developing the ability to analyze and discern complex problems and propose solutions. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 2500 - Sport Leadership and Ethics


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 
    The purpose of this course is to identify and analyze current trends/factors impacting sport leadership. The primary focus of the course is directed toward understanding the impact of leadership within sport administration and sport business. Current trends and examples in sport leadership will be researched, studied, and discussed. Specific course content will vary with the evolution of the field of sport business and sport management. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 2600 - Sports Management Field Experience


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 .
    An experiential learning opportunity that develops the student’s academic, personal, and career-related goals in a recreational/sport program or setting. Experience is gained at on or off campus sites. Theory is coordinated with practical experience. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 2990 - Special Topics in Sports Management


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Business.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of sports management. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    SM 3100 - Sport Facility & Event Management


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 BA 2010 .
    This course focuses on planning, maintaining, and managing single and multi-purpose sport/recreational facilities and associated sporting events. Students will become familiar with management techniques and strategies necessary for proper event promotion, implementation, and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between facility design and event success/failure. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 3300 - History of Sport Business


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 ; BA 2500 .
    This course offers a unique perspective of the business of American sport from the mid-1800’s through today, by exposing students to specific managerial challenges and issues that have faced and will continue to impact the sport industry. Assigned readings of historical events along with current developments in the sports-business industry will be examined. Commercialization of both private and public sport will be explored. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 3400 - Applied Skills in Sport Management


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 ; BA 2010 .
    Students in this course will explore in depth and detail various Managerial issues and challenges related to not only working in, but leading, a Sport Organization. Areas of importance for student learning will include; Sport Sales (including working within Sport Sales Teams), Sport Policy/Governance/Development across Secondary/High School/Collegiate level Administration, International Sport Administration Challenges/oversight bodies, as well as Ethical vs. Policy issues related to the changing world of Gender in Sports, Doping Policy, Disabled vs. Able-Bodied athletes, and various other sport management trends. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 4200 - Sports Marketing


    Prerequisite(s): BA 2500 .
    Application of marketing principles to the sport marketplace. Emphasis on organizing and analyzing the marketing process, planning the marketing mix, sport as a product, sport consumer markets, and sport sponsorships. Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 4500 - Current Issues in Sport


    Prerequisite(s): SM 1400 ; SM 3400 
    This course is a research seminar that will introduce students to the foundations and principles of conducting research at a senior level into the most current/relevant trends and issues within the sports industry. This course will utilize a research seminar format, taught in class or by arrangement depending on enrollment. It will allow students to explore, via conducting historical and meta-analytical research efforts, on issues pertaining to the future of the sport industry. Students will spend the semester engaged in completing a research project that allows them to complete a write-up and/or other form of presentation of the issues and trends they identify that will incorporate strategic planning, environmental analysis, internal analysis, and control methods related to their sport business topic.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    SM 4950 - Sports Management Internship


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Professional experience in a setting related to the field. The specific work setting and type of responsibilities are determined through consultation with the supervising instructor. Work responsibilities should be professional in nature and should not duplicate the SM 2600 - Sports Management Field Experience . Approved elective(s) may be substituted for this class. Theory is coordinated with practical experience. Credit(s): 1-3

Master of Business Administration

  
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    MBA 5050 - Executive Leadership


    Prerequisite(s): None. 
    An interactive study of theories, concepts, trends and best practices in personal leadership development, this course focuses on the optimization of leadership potential.   Designed for professionals at all levels, this course provides the framework for lifelong continuous improvement of leadership practices. Students will recognize and leverage personal leadership competencies. A personalized Leadership Development Plan (LDP), created through the lens of self-assessments, discussions, reflections, and targeted feedback, will be a primary outcome of this course.  Students will review management practices including task / project management, interpersonal and relationship management, change management, and strategic planning. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5110 - Management Information Systems


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    A study of information flows and information needs within organizations and technological responses to those needs. Attention will be given to the information needs of the full range of organizations from the very small firm, whose needs may be met with office suite software, to the largest multi-site organizations, which maintain information Intranets. Topics covered will include: business processes, data resources, information systems hardware and software, telecommunications, electronic enterprise, systems design. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5125 - Economic Decision Making for Managers


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course explores microeconomic and macroeconomic market forces that impact managerial decision making.  Price dynamics, consumer behavior and pricing strategies, cost analysis and market strategies, banking, monetary policy, and global economics are covered. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5140 - Accounting and Finance Decision Making for Managers


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course integrates principles from accounting and finance.  Students will learn how to analyze and evaluate financial information for effective planning, controlling and decision-making activities.  Significant emphasis is placed on the interpretation, analysis and communication of financial information. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5210 - Business Statistics


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050  or MSE 5000 .
    The application of mathematical and basic statistical methods to decision-making in all organizations. A computer software package will be used as a comprehensive hands-on reference tool to analyze data and to present findings. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5225 - Marketing and Innovation


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course explores strategic marketing and innovation. Strategic marketing topics include strategic market analysis, marketing strategy development, implementation of plans associated with the targeted marketing of products and services and their pricing, promotions, and distribution. Innovation topics include design thinking and entrepreneurial marketing. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5300 - Organizational Behavior


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    A study of behavior in corporate and organizational settings, including motivation, leadership, communication and power. Understanding contextual and environmental issues will be emphasized. Current and popular theoretical approaches will be examined. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5310 - Business Ethics


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    In this course students learn about the complex responsibilities facing business leaders today. Through cases about difficult managerial decisions, the course examines the legal, ethical and economic responsibility of corporate leaders. It also teaches students about management and governance systems leaders can use to promote responsible conduct by companies and their employees, and shows how personal values can play a critical role in effective leadership. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5320 - Quality Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    An integrated study in the design and implementation of quality management tools including relevant problem-solving methods and behavioral models from a process-oriented perspective. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5330 - Business Law


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course examines business law from the perspective of the professional (non-legal) manager. The course examines fundamental legal concepts and terminology, providing a basic foundation in civil procedure, and furnishing a substantive analysis of business torts, product liability, negligence, contract law, commercial law and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), debtor/creditor law, bankruptcy law, administrative law, alternative dispute resolution, and the litigation process. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5400 - Statistical Learning and Analytics


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course helps managers build statistical frameworks and ways of thinking when processing large amounts of information. Applications of statistical learning, including the degree to which conclusions can be generalized and the implication of statistical relationships, will be explored and applied to various business situations. The focus of the course is building functional models and drawing conclusions from data for organizational learning and decision making.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5410 - Operations and Technology Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course provides a practical view into the vast area of operations management, including the application of tools used for both tactical and strategic areas. Operations management includes critical facets such as supply chain, logistics and project management.  This course is specifically designed to provide you with a greater perception of operations management to understand competitive advantage, identify areas for improvement, and gain efficiencies while encouraging collaboration across multiple functional departments. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5600 - Human Resource Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    A study of the following key areas of HR: management practices, selection and placement, training and development, compensation and benefits, employee and labor relations, health/safety and security, and international HR issues. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Learning System will be utilized to facilitate the learning process required in the key HR areas. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5700 - E-Commerce Concepts


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course will examine how managers can effectively use this technology to enhance their organization’s competitive marketing position. Specific topics to be covered include use of the Internet for commerce, electronic payment systems, and the role of extranets in supply chain management. The course will help students better understand the local as well as global implications of e-commerce. The Internet will be used as a resource in the course as much as possible. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 5990 - Special Topics in Business


    Prerequisite(s): Varies.
    Directed study of a special body of subject matter in the field of business. This course may be repeated for additional credit.
      Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6000 - Analytics Boot Camp


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    This course helps prepare students for the analytical masters by covering basic prerequisite knowledge for success in studying analytics in enterprise. Students must successfully complete the class to move on in the program. The course can only be repeated once.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6010 - Data Wrangling and Big Data


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course covers applications to the management of data and big data in enterprise. Application of cloud computing and data engineering for exploratory analysis in enterprise. Emphasis on the benefits and responsibilities of digital enterprise’s collection and use of data. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6020 - Actionable Analytics and Model Building


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course helps managers understand the benefits and risks of analytical decision making and explores how to apply it effectively across teams and organizations. Students will make practical use of statistic and decision technologies to quantify organizational decisions. The course teaches managers the role of analytics in the decision intelligence framework and how analytics can help frame both agile and strategic decisions.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6050 - Forecasting Methods


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course covers the management and analysis of forecasting methods in making enterprise decisions. Application of appropriate tools for time and frequency analysis. Emphasis on applying forecasting models to improve organizational problem-solving. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6060 - Applications in Organizational Change


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course helps managers empower their team members to make the most of their unique contributions and guide them in expertise-specific decision-making. Managers will learn how to leverage talent to build innovative solutions based on analytic insights. The focus of the course will be on analyzing the assets of team members, mapping their decision-making protocols, and equipping them to add value.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6100 - Problem Framing and Sense-Making


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course covers the strategic management of decision-making heuristics from situational awareness to sense making for organizational opportunity capacity. The course explores the foundations of logic and sense-making to frame the problems organizational stakeholders face. Students then build on this understanding to build teams around unique organizational value adding solutions and construct strategies that build on situational realities, both quantitative and qualitative.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6200 - Performance Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course focuses on the important combination of training, communicating, and motivating skills required of leaders to successfully challenge employees to reach higher levels of performance. Goal setting, coaching, performing appraisals, and development of performance improvement plans are discussed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6210 - Labor Relations


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    This course is a study of industrial relations and the labor-management relations function of the modern work organization. The course examines problems, strategies, and policies of management interactions with formal and informal labor organizations. Labor legislation, collective bargaining, productivity analysis, and arbitration are stressed, with emphasis on negotiating strategies and techniques. Some time is also devoted to alternative dispute resolution as well as current trends in the labor movement. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6220 - Compensation Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5600 .
    This course is a study of the strategic approach for motivating human performance in organizations through a total compensation system. The focus of the course will be on a blending of compensation management theory and trends with specific strategies regarding creating a corporate compensation system. Theoretical models from economics, psychology, and sociology are integrated in analyses of issues of wage structuring, the design of incentives, and wage level. Practical exercises in the design of compensation systems are employed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6230 - Global Supply Chain Management


    Prerequisite(s): None.
    With increased globalization and offshore sourcing, global supply chain management is becoming an important issue for many businesses. This course explores modern global integrated supply chain management. The course enables students to appreciate the challenges of operating supply chains across international boundaries including how to manage various salient issues including sociocultural, economic, technological and political factors that may shape decisions relating to sourcing and moving goods and services across different geographical boundaries. Course material includes supply chain topics such as procurement, inventory management, operations, quality management, logistics and transportation. In addition, issues related to humanitarian logistics and ethical business practices in the context of evolving supply chains around the world are included.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6310 - Project Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050  or MSE 5000 .
    A study of effective project planning and management. Topics covered include: project goals and objectives, feasibility study including estimation of completion times and costs, evaluation and review, incentives, and quantitative analysis. Case studies and project management software will be used extensively. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6320 - Leading Global Projects


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 6310 .
    This course presents a framework for project management that requires cross-functional integration of key business processes within the firm and across the network of firms that comprise key aspects within project management. This course approaches project management from a managerial perspective and introduces concepts in a format useful for management decision making. Basic terms, concepts, and principles are examined in light of how they interrelate and interface within the firm and across projects globally. Illustrations are taken from corporate applications of these concepts to show how project and program management can be implemented. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6400 - International Marketing


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5225 .
    This course focuses upon the four decision areas of Marketing: Product Decisions, Pricing Decisions, Promotion Decisions, and Distribution Decisions in a global context. Emphasis will be placed upon a whole-strategy approach to entering global markets. The mechanics of import/export will also be addressed. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6410 - Salesmanship & Promotional Strategy


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5225 .
    An in-depth study of the four major promotional tools:  Personal Selling, Advertising, Publicity, and Sales Promotion. Emphasis will be given to Personal Selling, stressing its role in the firm’s overall promotional strategy, and the Personal Selling Process. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6420 - Marketing Research


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5225 .
    A study of the generation, organization, interpretation, and use of Marketing Information in the business enterprise. The strategic role of Marketing Information is emphasized. Topics covered include: sources of information, research design and implementation, hypothesis testing, and problem-solving/decision-making. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6430 - Pro Selling and Sales Force Mgmt


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5225 .
    An exploration of the knowledge, tactics and strategies for building and sustaining a contemporary sales organization. This study enables students to develop personal selling skills as well as the knowledge for managing a sales force. The management issues discussed in this course include hiring, training, and motivating salespersons as well as sales forecasting, planning and sales force organization. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6440 - Advertising & Promotion Management


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    Companies of all sizes face challenging decisions on how to reach prospects and retain their current customer base. The ever-changing economy, predicting and meeting consumer demands, the growth of ethnic markets, emerging technologies and the changing demographics are issues that companies face when advertising and promoting their product. Prior knowledge in market research will enable you to implement the key advertising principles and practices while providing you with the knowledge on how IMC (integrated marketing communication) plays a critical role in building customer relationships and brands. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6490 - Special Topics in Marketing


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5225 .
    This course is a directed study of contemporary issues in marketing. This course may be repeated for additional credit. Credit(s): 1-6
  
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    MBA 6500 - Small Business Administration


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5050 .
    A study of the smaller business enterprise and the special management issues and challenges faced by the proprietor/entrepreneur. Emphasis will be given to problem-solving and decision-making in the major functional areas common to small enterprises. Case studies will be used. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6520 - Data Communication and Visualization


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5400 .
    This course helps managers understand the role of various team members and stakeholders in the decision-making process. Further, this class explores the tools used to optimize decision-making in organizations through effective communication and visualization. The course specifically identifies how the art and science of data visualization work together to share insights and inspire action.  Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6600 - Employment Law


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5600 .
    A review of the major regulatory influences that affect human resource management. The regulatory focus will include Civil Rights, Compensation and Benefits, Employee Health and Safety, along with Labor Relations legislation. Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 6610 - Seminar in Human Resources


    Prerequisite(s): MBA 5600 .
    Students will attend the National Convention for the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). This course is a capstone event that requires professional membership in the SHRM and the opportunity to become professionally certified. Most issues addressed at the Conference will be globally related and will include: sexual harassment, compensation planning, disabilities, flexible workplaces, global education, legal perspectives, along with approximately one hundred other topics. In addition, the networking and the trade show are spectacular conference events. Credit(s): 3
 

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